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Old January 19th, 2010, 02:09 AM   #31
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Shaun

No delays on the one example I saw.
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Old January 20th, 2010, 12:18 AM   #32
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No seek delays that I saw either. I am not sure if there is any consumer DVD authoring software that can handle this process at the moment, it probably requires something that digs deeper into the DVD architecture, but it's certainly the cleverest anti-piracy tech out.
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Old January 20th, 2010, 12:30 AM   #33
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I'd certainly like to know how they actually do it. Brilliant idea.

Doesn't surprise me that there isn't any gliches from seek times. Given how the drive mechanisms for computer DVD drives are well beyond the 1x spec, it would go without saying that this tech improvement would easily be back-ported to DVD player mechanisms.

I'd expect that decent DVD players would have a buffer internally so that any minor interruptions to reading the disc don't manifest to the viewing experience.

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Old January 20th, 2010, 07:00 AM   #34
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My solution is simple: I don't take projects where my income depends on a per-disc charge. I get a flat fee for the production, then charge a fair price for DVD duplication (typically $2.25 per copy in paper sleeves, a little more in cases.)

If the client wants to make sharpie copies of the DVD, that's fine by me, but I'm sure they'd rather pay me for a professionally made copy.

If a client calls and wants me to shoot an event and they try to tell me how much I can make on DVD sales, I'll tell them $xxxx for the production and I'll provide xxx DVDs for them to sell.
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Old January 20th, 2010, 08:17 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Parkes View Post
I am not sure if there is any consumer DVD authoring software that can handle this process at the moment, it probably requires something that digs deeper into the DVD architecture, but it's certainly the cleverest anti-piracy tech out.
Probably something like DVDLab will do the job. DVDlab DVD authoring tool
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Old January 20th, 2010, 05:29 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Chris Davis View Post
My solution is simple: I don't take projects where my income depends on a per-disc charge. I get a flat fee for the production, then charge a fair price for DVD duplication (typically $2.25 per copy in paper sleeves, a little more in cases.)

If the client wants to make sharpie copies of the DVD, that's fine by me, but I'm sure they'd rather pay me for a professionally made copy.

If a client calls and wants me to shoot an event and they try to tell me how much I can make on DVD sales, I'll tell them $xxxx for the production and I'll provide xxx DVDs for them to sell.
Aside from eliminating all the screwing around, that's also much kinder to people buying the DVD, to whom the video represents a priceless memory and may have a genuinely legitimate interest in backing up for the long term.
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 05:19 AM   #37
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Anyone tried or heard of this?
Patronus - DVD Anti Rip Copy Protection

The logic is that if you can't rip it, you can't make a copy. It works with dvd burners.
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 06:49 AM   #38
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It sounds promising, but if it is software based then it will eventually be defeated by the people out there with a content protection breaking hobby. It's only a matter of time until they notice it, especially if major labels are going to be using it.

So it might do the job for now, but I doubt that it will work for the rest of time.

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Old February 23rd, 2010, 05:40 PM   #39
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While it is true that software can be defeated, if they continue development to keep up with hackers, then it might be good. But I do see the point that if I can lock the dvd now, it can be unlocked later by a hacker next year. This is from their website:

"Keeping ahead of the mass ripping technologies out there is an ongoing 'arms race'. Patronus is being continually developed to keep ahead in this race with typically 2 new versions being developed at any one time. Vigorous testing based on rip ability and playability is the key criteria in the release of any new version to ensure that a high level of customer satisfaction is maintained."
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 07:02 PM   #40
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The issue for already released DVDs is that you can't physically replace them with newer anti-rip versions.

On the other hand, if it can get you through the peak sales period for a commercial title, then it may be good enough to get the job done as far as the business case for it is concerned.

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Old February 23rd, 2010, 07:42 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Warren Kawamoto View Post
Anyone tried or heard of this?
Patronus - DVD Anti Rip Copy Protection

The logic is that if you can't rip it, you can't make a copy. It works with dvd burners.
Here is a quote from their FAQ:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patronus FAQ
The original media content is not modified and play-back quality remains unaffected. This is achieved by introducing copy control encapsulation in areas of the disc that are not read by DVD players during playback.
Translation: Anybody can copy the DVD by using the readily available DVDFab software in its "pathplayer" mode. In that mode the software reads the disc the same way a DVD player does, completely bypassing the "Patronus" (what a name, did they rip it off Harry Potter?) and copying only the video to a new disc. The new disc can then be copied without any special software. And of course it will play everything that is on the original disc.

You'd think they'd at least come up with something original. In reality, Disney has been using the same type of copy protection on all of their DVDs for years. And they have been ripped successfully by DVDFab for just as many years. And the same type of protection was used back in the days of 5.25" diskettes! And soon the program CopyIIPC was able to bypass that protection. In the 1980s!

Save your money! If someone wants to rip your DVD, he will. No amount of copy protection will stop them. Most people do not know how to do it. But those people do not know how to defeat the standard CSS protection either. So, use the standard protection and do not worry about hackers. After all, chances are they would not buy your DVD anyway, so it makes no difference to you financially.
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Old June 10th, 2010, 02:05 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Taky Cheung View Post
I have done this before and it works. What you need to do is to add 10 minutes of blank / black video at the end of the last chapter. After the DVD is burned, use an exacto knife to make some mark on the outter edge on the DVD where the different shade is visible to you.

In that case, the DVD can still be played fine on computer and DV player. However, when someone try to make a copy with the computer, it will report error and won't copy the entire disc. If they ignore the error, they can copy everything except the last 1GB file in the Video_TS folder.
Thanks Taky, I tried this and it works. My sales for an annual event doubled over last year.

I have one possible reservation. By making the small "cut" in the black video on the surface of the DVD, I wonder if , over months or years, that cut could "expose the sublayers" and then that exposure could spread into the program and ruin the disc for playback. Possibly causing oxidation or something like that ???
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Old June 10th, 2010, 10:22 PM   #43
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I wouldn't think so. The polycarbonate disc wouldn't go through too much flexing in its lifetime, and with DVD writeable discs, the data layer is literally on top of the opposite side of the disc platter.

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Old June 11th, 2010, 02:12 AM   #44
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Hi from Pushpa

Hi Andrew

Ur name sounds very familiar to me...R u working for OPTUS in Brisbane??

Thx
Pushpa de Silva

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Smith View Post
The issue for already released DVDs is that you can't physically replace them with newer anti-rip versions.

On the other hand, if it can get you through the peak sales period for a commercial title, then it may be good enough to get the job done as far as the business case for it is concerned.

Andrew
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Old June 11th, 2010, 02:25 AM   #45
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Nope, that's not me. Plenty of other Andrew Smiths around ... lotsa fun when it comes to voting at election time. :-)

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