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Old December 8th, 2006, 08:49 AM   #1
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DVD media??

What DVDs are folks using to burn the weddings on? Also where are you purchasing them from?

thanks
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Old December 8th, 2006, 10:26 AM   #2
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I use Verbatim printables #94495. Been using them for 2 years now and before that I used the same ones but a different number (4X now instead of 2X) but I always burn at 2X. I get them from Tape Resources in Texas. Tapes too. I've not had a single problem with these discs and I have burned them full to brim for corporate work on many occassions.
Not the cheapest around but really good service AND you get a bag of M&Ms with each order and that counts for something! ;-)
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Old December 8th, 2006, 10:32 AM   #3
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I use Verbatims and Maxells. I like the Maxell's which print to center. I think they're prettier for weddings and such because you don't have to big of a hole.

But I certainly don't get a bag of M&M's from Sams Club. I'm jealous.
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Old December 8th, 2006, 10:40 AM   #4
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From what I have read and heard, Taiyo Yuden are the best you can get for our line of work. They are better than verbatim, but in most cases verbatim and maxell will do a good job. I have had problems with both though (verbatim and maxell).
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Old December 8th, 2006, 11:23 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Moreau
From what I have read and heard, Taiyo Yuden are the best you can get for our line of work
I 2nd the Taiyo. Inexpensive as well.

Why does "our line of work" require a special DVD? :)
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Old December 8th, 2006, 11:55 AM   #6
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I didn't mean that our line of work requirea a special DVD, but I do think that the media we use for relatively small runs is different than than those used by film studios making millions of copies. Perhaps it is just the printable surface, but I thought the media itself would be better/ more reliable with playback.
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Old December 8th, 2006, 04:27 PM   #7
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Thanks for sharing, I appreciate it. One more question are you using DVD-R or DVD+Rs?
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Old December 8th, 2006, 05:03 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janice DeMille
Thanks for sharing, I appreciate it. One more question are you using DVD-R or DVD+Rs?
I think you'll find most older players are more compatible with DVD-R.
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Old December 8th, 2006, 05:08 PM   #9
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I agree. The new players today would probably play a pancake if it would fit but it seems that DVD-R has pretty much become the standard format of burned DVDs and as long as the player isn't more than about 3 or 4 years old it should play fine-however when I get a call about a DVD not playing in a certain player the first thing I ask is "how old is the player" especially when it plays in the clients 2 other players. I generally tell them to go somewhere and buy a new one for 30 bucks. Problem solved. If it plays in one then there's nothing wrong with the DVD.

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Old December 8th, 2006, 08:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom
If it plays in one then there's nothing wrong with the DVD.

Don
With new DVD players playing many different formats such as DIVX and much more, a DVD that plays in one player really doesn't mean there is nothing wrong with the DVD. The burning process can render the DVD playable on more or less set-top players- which I have found out the hard way after spending two days on the phoen with the tech support of microboards in regards to my duplicator/printer.
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Old December 8th, 2006, 10:22 PM   #11
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Patrick,
I really don't understand your post. Are you saying that because the set top players can play various formats that if it doesn't play on one player but does on another there COULD be something wrong with the DVD??

If thats incorrect please explain your reasoning further.

Here's what I've found after burning more than a "few" DVD-R discs and having them play on countless machines of all makes and models. If it doesn't play on 1 machine but plays on another GENERALLY it is because the machine it doesn't play on is an older machine and simply won't read it. Usually those machines are at least 3 years or older but not always. I have a 5 year old machine that plays everything and another 1 that is 4 years old that won't play my burned DVDs. Same manufacturer, different model, different age. I have 3 other machines here that I test ALL of my burned DVDs on and they are all 2 to 3 years old and every single DVD plays on each of those machines.
Again, I'm a bit confused with what you're saying. Could you please clarify.

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Old December 8th, 2006, 10:32 PM   #12
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I had a portable and a regular DVD player that I would test my DVDs out on. Both were older and I started to have problems with playing some DVDs. I thought it was my burner, but in the end it was the players. The portable ended up not playing any DVD, to include commercial movie DVDs so I got a new one. Never had a problem since. Someone even paid about 40 dollors for the broken portable on ebay for parts. Recycle everything baby!

I do use DVD-R nearly exclusively. Newest, best, whatever! But, I do have a bunch of DVD+R's left that I use, for storage and personal stuff.

Mike
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Old December 11th, 2006, 07:01 AM   #13
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The main problem with older (and some new) dvd players is that they do not like 'burnt' discs, they are expecting DVD-ROM discs.

To make your discs as playable as possible there is a setting that can be flagged on the disc during the burning session to change the setting to DVD-ROM so when placed in a player it plays it as a regular disc.

It is called the bit-setting and here is a link explaining more...

http://www.k-probe.com/bitsetting-booktype-faq.php

I use nero 7 to burn and +R discs as the bit setting change works much better on + discs than - ones.

I also use Verbatims and Maxells with very little failure.

Vince
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Old December 11th, 2006, 07:54 AM   #14
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Janice, to get back to your question that started this discussion, I've been using Ritek Ridata white injet printable DVD-R disks for the past few years w/o any problems. My source is either www.supermediastore.com or www.meritline.com, whichever has the best price when I'm ready to order more.

I use an Epson R200 to print directly on the disks. I think the newest model is the R220 or R230. After I'm not sure how many hundreds of disks, my old printer refuses to die, so I can't comment on how good the newer ones are, but my R200 has held up exceptionally well, even with using non-Epson brand ink.

For making the disk & jacket labels, I use Discus, which is made by www.magicmouse.com/h_discus_detail.html. If you click on that link it'll take you to their site for a free trial download. It's super easy to use, and has templates for almost every printer and for all brands of stick-on disk labels, if you ever use any of those.
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Old December 11th, 2006, 10:10 AM   #15
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do not use stick on labels for DVDs... they will come off in your client's DVD player becaues of the heat and gum / jam it up entirely. I'm sure some will say it's fine, but it's not worth the risk.
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