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Old March 6th, 2008, 11:00 PM   #1
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So how many of you Final Cut Pro Users have been certified at Video Symphony in burbank. I'm looking at it but just curious of some first hand opinionss! thankss
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Old March 7th, 2008, 12:41 AM   #2
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certifications are worthless, except to the people making money handing the paper out. all it means is you took an obscure trivia test and passed. it has nothing to do with if you can really edit, or really know how to use an app in the real world.
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Old March 7th, 2008, 02:25 PM   #3
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well it's just I am fifteen and would like to get a job at Apple and already know final cut. so Do you think that would help? Or Am i just better off going in and showing them what i can do? and putting that couple grand into my camera rather than that certificate? Thanks=)
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Old March 7th, 2008, 10:09 PM   #4
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I would put your couple grand into your camera. Developing the skills to produce quality film is essential. I think at this point, it will be more beneficial for you to get familiar with a prosumer type camera. Then, once you are decent and want to get a job in the broadcasting industry, credentials such as a certification may sing to an employer a little louder. However, at some point in your experiences, you may simply immerse yourself into the film culture so far that you won't need "certification." People's simple recognition of your work will be proof alone.

I find it funny that there are so many people in college who have chosen "art" as their major when they have no skills what so ever with hopes to develop them at some point during the course of their bachelors program.

My advice to you is buy a camera and make as many films as you can until the thing explodes. That is the best kind of training.
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Old March 8th, 2008, 03:18 AM   #5
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The way I'd approach things...

1- Figure out where you want to work. The film/video industry has many segments, some of them highly specialized. For example, if you want to do online editing, the knowledge is very specific (e.g. the pages of menus in a digital betacam deck) and the only way to learn that is from working an entry-level job there.

2- Figure out how to get there. Usually the way to go is to get an entry-level job and learn the ropes from somebody. This can save you time from re-inventing the wheel.

Quote:
Or Am i just better off going in and showing them what i can do?
You can send in a demo reel.

However, don't send in a bad demo reel.... that can hurt your chances rather than help them. If you're starting out, it might be that your initial work isn't that great. You could compare by checking your reel against other people's reels.
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Old March 8th, 2008, 06:27 AM   #6
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Get focussed on what you want to do and go for it. I wanted to become an editor and so everything I did was to that end. Employers will detect the vibes that make you tick and you will then stick out from the media studies deadbeats who 'fancy' a life in the film/tv business. I was lucky(committed) so made it from runner to full broadcast doco features editor in 6 years. I made my own films and gained so much experience (and a few awards). That gave me confidence when applying for jobs.
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Old March 8th, 2008, 12:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loren Simons View Post
well it's just I am fifteen and would like to get a job at Apple and already know final cut. so Do you think that would help? Or Am i just better off going in and showing them what i can do? and putting that couple grand into my camera rather than that certificate? Thanks=)
Loren,
Just curious. What particular type of job or role do you hope to get with Apple?

Is it that you want to be a certified trainer in Final Cut Pro?

Do you want to be a software developer for the film/animation division or a quality control engineer working with their applications?

Is it that you want to make promotional/ad content for them?

I'm asking because there are different skill sets and relative associations depending upon what you want to do, and if you are a little more specific, I can probably get a little bit of info for you.

As far as certifications, to a large degree, what Steve wrote is correct. Depending upon what you are looking to do, many forms of certification are basically worthless. Skills you may have gained from achieving those certifications can possibly be very valuable - but the certificates themselves often mean little-to-nothing outside of the organization that awards the certificate. (there are some exceptions)

Apple does offer a certification course for FCP to become an Apple Certified Pro, which may possibly get you in some doors, but is often associated with certifying users as potential trainers to teach FCP to others. This may interest you, but would depend upon your intended goal. I am not sure if this particular certification would be relevant to what you hope to do with Apple.

One of our forum sponsors, DV Creators has some information on FCP classes as well as periodical certification exams they offer down in Santa Monica - which is closer to your neck of the woods. Not sure if this particular direction is right for you, but you can find more info at:

http://www.dvcreators.net/events/app...fied-pro-exam/

Hope this helps.

-Jon
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Old March 8th, 2008, 10:56 PM   #8
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having worked with interns a lot, this is what I have seen. out of any given 10, 3 have NO CLUE what they are doing and got into a communications major because it was cool, and was"better" then a liberal arts degree. the next 7 varied from useless to somewhat usefull. none where really comitted but where doing something. then there was the 2-3 that counted. the ones that paid attention, could actually carry out tasks, and wanted to work in the biz. I'd always try to work with them and teach them stuff.

so at your point, figure out what you want to do. I personally do several jobs - I DP, edit, do VFX and mograph work. I also have worked as a lighting and set designer. now some folks may say how can you do more then one job well, my answer ? its all the same job, just different tools ! camera one day is no different then AE, combustion, RED the next. its all about combining visual elements in a pleasing way, with good sound. did I also say I write music too ? why not ? does it really matter if one day I design ( and build ! ) a set based on color, shape, ect, or build a graphic title treatment based on color, shape, ect ? no. same thing, different tools.

don't get too pigeon holed too early. thats a LA thing. in NY some what less so, and once you leave those markets there is more flexibility to "cross lines" and do more then one job, even do that job well.

the one area I can say is really deep and dedicated is 3D work - model, texture, animate. they can each be huge areas to learn and get good at.

so the best thing you could do is work with some local prod co's that are doing good ( high end ) work and take it from there. you will work a few gigs for free, but if you learn fast and master basic job skills, they will so start to offer you some $. I know I took a intern from a year a go and now I pay them for going out on shoots because they know enough to do ok.stay away from the low end prod co's. simple approach them and be honest. the poser's are soon sorted out and discarded... or they become producers or directors :(
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Old March 9th, 2008, 01:29 AM   #9
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i think that is just what i will do =) I think I will scrap the certification for now, also because once i mentioned i was fifteen, they didn't email me back! Now thats just rude! But I'll just go into work with my dad alot more, work with the camera men, and i guess work on the Avid when im there, they are pretty Anti-FCP, although i like fcp better, Avid is still the biggest name to through out when I'm looking for a job. So thank you to everyone =)
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