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Old June 16th, 2008, 03:33 PM   #1
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FCP: Exporting full res

From FCP, if I export to QT movie, using current settings, and checking "make self contained," will that result in full res, highest quality output? Or will that compress the footage at all? At this point I just want to give raw footage from a client--is this the way to go, or should I use Compressor, and if Compressor, which format will give me full res?

Uncompressed 10-bit?

By the way the footage is 30f HD 16:9 from a Canon XH-A1.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 05:15 PM   #2
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If you use "Current Settings", FCP will export using the Codec and Quality settings of the Timeline, not the source footage, unless they are one and the same.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 05:18 PM   #3
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Thanks for the response. Perhaps this is a dumb question, but how do check the codec setting for the timeline?

eta: OK, I think I figured it out: highlight clip in timeline, and then select "item properties" under EDIT menu...
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Old June 16th, 2008, 05:34 PM   #4
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Better way is to select the Sequence in the Browser and select Item Properties, to be absolutely sure.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 05:52 PM   #5
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OK, so if I export with "current settings," I'll get the same settings as my sequence? And this will not compress or otherwise degrade the image?

What about using the clips in the capture scratch folder--those should be full quality, right? Say you imported footage and you don't need to edit it--you could just use those .mov files in the scratch folder? Any downside to that?
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Old June 16th, 2008, 07:10 PM   #6
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If you captured in DV-NTSC and the sequence is in DV-NTSC then when you export as "Self-Contained" the file is a direct transfer of the data in the original files except the parts that have to be rendered (fades, color-correction, etc). It's a very clean way to make a digital copy of your edit. Files that were originally in a different codec will be rendered into the sequence's codec.

Make sure your client can view these files. They are not typical QuickTime files as indicated by the different icon they carry. I'm not entirely sure but I think you need a form of Final Cut installed to use these files.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 08:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by William Hohauser View Post
If you captured in DV-NTSC and the sequence is in DV-NTSC then when you export as "Self-Contained" the file is a direct transfer of the data in the original files except the parts that have to be rendered (fades, color-correction, etc). It's a very clean way to make a digital copy of your edit. Files that were originally in a different codec will be rendered into the sequence's codec.

Make sure your client can view these files. They are not typical QuickTime files as indicated by the different icon they carry. I'm not entirely sure but I think you need a form of Final Cut installed to use these files.
Is there an alternative file format or codec that's more universal?
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Old June 16th, 2008, 09:26 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Jim Newberry View Post
Is there an alternative file format or codec that's more universal?
Shaun was just citing DV-NTSC as an example.

In order to figure out what you need to do, tell us what you captured your footage as, as well as the timeline settings. Also, how are you delivering the footage to the client? Tape? Hard drive?
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Old June 16th, 2008, 10:18 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Mike Barber View Post
Shaun was just citing DV-NTSC as an example.

In order to figure out what you need to do, tell us what you captured your footage as, as well as the timeline settings. Also, how are you delivering the footage to the client? Tape? Hard drive?
I'm delivering the footage on disc or hard drive. Sequence properties: HD (1440x1080), 48K stereo audio, compressor: HDV 1080p30.

By the way, when I said, "Is there an alternative file format or codec that's more universal?" I was responding to William who said: "Make sure your client can view these files. They are not typical QuickTime files as indicated by the different icon they carry. I'm not entirely sure but I think you need a form of Final Cut installed to use these files."
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Old June 17th, 2008, 12:11 AM   #10
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Jim, the quicktimes with the final cut logo on macs are still just quicktimes and can be viewed by anyone - they just have metadata that makes them optimised for use in Final Cut Pro (generally to do with Final Cut's gamma settings etc.)
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Old June 17th, 2008, 12:08 PM   #11
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Jim, the quicktimes with the final cut logo on macs are still just quicktimes and can be viewed by anyone - they just have metadata that makes them optimised for use in Final Cut Pro (generally to do with Final Cut's gamma settings etc.)
Well, correct me if I'm wrong, but since it's HDV, it's MPEG2, for which you'll need the special codes (included with FCE and FCS). A "regular" OS X install won't be able to play those. So, I agree with William, make sure the client has those codecs. If not, he should be able to watch the clips using VLC.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 12:49 PM   #12
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Just remember that every transcode to another Codec is another transcode "hit" in terms of re-compression.

In the "olde" days, we used to "bump up" U-Matic (a composite format) to BetaSP (a component format) for post as component holds up better in multiple pass post but we still took a generational loss going to Beta in the first place. I mention this only out of nostalgia: digital transcodes are a little more forgiving than analog dubs, but the premise is the same.

If you CAN get by with passing on the MPEG streams, do it.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 03:45 PM   #13
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OK, I'm a bit confused. My client asked for .mov files, which I'll get if I export from FCP at current settings, right? Is mpeg a codec as well as a file format?

"Just remember that every transcode to another Codec is another transcode "hit" in terms of re-compression."

In my situation, when is the footage being transcoded? When I capture it to FCP? When I export it with current settings?
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Old June 17th, 2008, 04:07 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Jim Newberry View Post
OK, I'm a bit confused. My client asked for .mov files, which I'll get if I export from FCP at current settings, right? Is mpeg a codec as well as a file format?

"Just remember that every transcode to another Codec is another transcode "hit" in terms of re-compression."

In my situation, when is the footage being transcoded? When I capture it to FCP? When I export it with current settings?
OK, I just tested this here at work. I'm outputting files from FCS the same way as described by you (export using Quicktime, same settings as source). I'm using HDV 1080p24 from a Canon A1. These movies end with .mov and when I try to open one on a Mac that does not have either FCE or FCS installed, quicktime player shows a dialog saying it needs additional software (= mpeg2 codecs).
On my MBP, Quicktime player identifies the files as Apple HDV 1080p24.
.Mov (a generic name for a movie) is a container for many formats, including mpeg2. The mpeg2 codec is just the part of quicktime that's needed to play such (mpeg2) files.

Again, your client needs those codecs to watch these clips. Otherwise you'll have to reencode. You'll see the codecs (components) on your mac if you go to /Library/QuickTime.

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Old June 17th, 2008, 04:50 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Dino Leone View Post
OK, I just tested this here at work. I'm outputting files from FCS the same way as described by you (export using Quicktime, same settings as source). I'm using HDV 1080p24 from a Canon A1. These movies end with .mov and when I try to open one on a Mac that does not have either FCE or FCS installed, quicktime player shows a dialog saying it needs additional software (= mpeg2 codecs).
On my MBP, Quicktime player identifies the files as Apple HDV 1080p24.
.Mov (a generic name for a movie) is a container for many formats, including mpeg2. The mpeg2 codec is just the part of quicktime that's needed to play such (mpeg2) files.

Again, your client needs those codecs to watch these clips. Otherwise you'll have to reencode. You'll see the codecs (components) on your mac if you go to /Library/QuickTime.

Dino
Thanks, that's very helpful. Is there a way I could export this with a more universal codec? If so, what would that be?
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