Timecode Breaks! OS X, FCP 3 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Final Cut Suite
Discussing the editing of all formats with FCS, FCP, FCE


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 30th, 2002, 08:37 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London
Posts: 37
Timecode Breaks! OS X, FCP 3

Hi

I recently bought a G4 dual Processor that shipped with OS 10.2

I loaded FCP 3 into OS X because that what it says you can do in the manual! There's a QuickTime leaftlet included with FCP 3 detailing QuickTime installation into OS X

I have logged DVCAM tapes straight off my PD150 over firewire into the MAC. When I try to batch-capture I keep getting 'timecode break' error messages. The process stops and FCP tells me I can't use the clip.

I'M SCARED! I've bust a gut this year and can't afford to loose to these breaks the 22 DVCAM tapes I have.

These clips play fine on the camcorder and the timecode certainly seems to be continuous and contiguous. I'm going to upgrade to FCP 3.2 tonight as this now seems to support QuickTime 6 that shipped with my machine. If it doesn't solve the problem has anyone got any suggestions as to what the issue may be? I can't believe all these tapes (I've tried 3 cartridges, all displaying this problem) are corrupt. Least not because they're masters and have been treated that way.

Any help, thoughts or suggestions are greatly appreciated!

Cheers

Simon
Simon Davies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2002, 09:22 AM   #2
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
Probably no need for concern. Upgrading to FCP 3.0.2 will probably solve your dropped frame issues. I know it has for many. Other possible causes are how you have your system files, application files and media files (captured clips). If everything is on the same drive you may have problems. It is not advisable to capture to the same partition as the system files and FCP application files. Many people go so far as to capture to a seperate drive (either internal ATA or external FireWire). This seperate capture drive solves many peoples dropped frame errors. You might also want to check how you have FCP3 configured.

Under FCP>Preferences> uncheck the boxs abort capture on dropped frames and broken timecode. This will allow you to capture the media and then examine the clips for dropped frames. I had a dropped frame isuues a year ago or so. FCP would drop the first 2 or 3 frames but then everything was fine. So I unchecked the box and added a little longer handle to my edit and everything was fine. Try the upgrade first and post back if your still having problems.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2002, 04:57 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Melbourne, FL
Posts: 171
I've had the same problem with 3.0.2. I unchecked the abort capture boxes, was able to capture, edit and output to DVD with no prob. Still don't like the broken timecode message, though. I capure to ext. HD.
__________________
esquared
Eric Emerick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 09:10 AM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London
Posts: 37
Made an Ass of myself!

Hi guys

Thanks for the replies, guess what?? Last night I went through my footage with a fine tooth comb and low and behold; there ARE timecode breaks in it! I feel rather stupid now I have to say ...

The breaks are literally one or two frames in length and virtually impossible to see unless you advance frame by frame using device control. This must have occurred whilst I was recording, although every effort was made to keep the timecode continuous. I don't know if there is anyway to identify these tiny breaks whilst one is logging clips in FCP?

Anyhow, I'm much relieved and VERY happy - thanks for your suggestions, sorry for the misguided original posting!

Simon
Simon Davies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 01:13 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London, UK
Posts: 105
Of course one could just blank the tapes prior to filming to eliminate any possibility of timecode breaks. So here's a question, "How many of you actually do blank their tapes?"

I always do this with my XL1, tedious but worth it in the end. Eventually I hope to get a DV recorder such as the Sony or perhaps the new Panasonic one. Using this to also blank the tapes would minimise ware and tear on the XL1 heads.

[Edit: Oops, should be called "blacked" not "blanked"]
Simon Plissi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 01:25 PM   #6
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
I'm confused. The tape that has the timecode breaks was blacked (blanked) or previously used, or new? You sort of indicate that you black tapes prior to use , but I'm not sure. Any way, I do not black tapes. I have recently run into tapes that have been blacked and are missing a frame or two (just like your tape). I fast forward and rewind new tapes, but i do not black them.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 01:34 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London, UK
Posts: 105
<<<-- Originally posted by Jeff Donald : I'm confused. The tape that has the timecode breaks was blacked (blanked) or previously used, or new? You sort of indicate that you black tapes prior to use , but I'm not sure. Any way, I do not black tapes. I have recently run into tapes that have been blacked and are missing a frame or two (just like your tape). I fast forward and rewind new tapes, but i do not black them.

Jeff -->>>

Jeff, err, I black my tapes. The other Simon doesn't indicate he does this.
Simon Plissi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 01:36 PM   #8
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
Simon,
You certainly did not make an "ass" of yourself with your question. Quite the contrary. We've ALL suffered time code breaks many times.

Blanking (or time code striping) tapes is a philosophical matter around here. Some subscribe to it, others do not. With some practice and discipline I think you'll not have to resort to blanking. Generally:

1. Always record 10+ sec of SMPTE color bars at the beginning of a tape.

2. Always shoot a few seconds more for each shot than you'll really need. This gives you a buffer for your next shot if you need to reposition the tape.

3. Avoid reviewing footage or removing a tape while you are in the midst of shooting. That's generally what leads to breaks.

4. If you can't avoid #3 make sure you position the tape in the end buffer (#2) of that last shot. Most Canon cameras feature a handy Rec Search function that will play the last few seconds of the shot just before the current position and will leave the tape positioned at the end of that shot, thus avoiding break. I don't know if the PD150 has a similar feature but I'll bet it does.

Good luck with your projects!
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 01:58 PM   #9
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
Sorry, see how easily I'm confused. Two Simons did me in. Any way Ken's advice is to the point. Some black their tapes and some don't. I'm a don't. Blacked tapes have caused me some trouble recently in post and I urge my professional clients not to black tapes.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 10:48 PM   #10
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: New Delhi, India
Posts: 107
Simon-X:
Let me get this straight: When you're saying you black out the tapes before you shoot, I assume that means you record black on it. Do you simply cap the lens and press record (if you're doing this on the camera)?
I was always under the impression that if you did this, you would be subjecting the tape to two record runs, thereby resulting in more dropouts - it would be tantamount to using a once used tape, wouldn't it?
Of course, I've laid black on tape often when editing linear on Beta SP... helps you work on simple insert edit mode instead of assemble (and thereby resulting in more flexibility of editing). I used to set the edit controller for black signal, and lay balck for the proposed duration of the programme/film...and that was that.
Anyone?
Best,
Ram
Ram Nagarajan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2002, 11:07 PM   #11
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
Yes, striping a tape can be as simple as recording with the lens cap on and the mic unplugged. Good quality DV tape is not as fragile as message board posts might have you believe. Two record passes are not likely to be any problem whatsoever on the tape.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2002, 02:42 AM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London, UK
Posts: 105
Ideosync:
Basically yes. At the moment I'm doing this in-camera, though like I said I would rather do it on an external DV recorder. I actually record pseudo SMPTE colour bars using the XL1 secret key combo.

And just as Ken says, DV is not that fragile. Use good quality tapes and you'll hardly ever see any drop outs.
Simon Plissi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2002, 06:37 AM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London
Posts: 37
DVCAM

I spoke with a very knowledgegable guy at a local service center who told me that DVCAM media is 'extremely' tough wearing so I imagine blacking out tapes and then recording, i.e. 2 record runs, would be fine.

Personally I very much like Ken's suggestion of recording SMPTE bars and leaving the shots to overrun. Think I'll do this one in the future...

Jeff - 2 Simon's in one post - the confusion never ends!

Cheers all.
Simon Davies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2002, 08:04 AM   #14
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: New Delhi, India
Posts: 107
Ken, Simon X, thanks: Guess old Beta SP analog habits and worries die hard! :-) Need to get over my two-pass fears...
I think the record-bars-on-the-first-run idea is great: I tend to record wild- tracks for ambient sound against bars on the same tape anyway; so this fits right in: And you might as well save yourself the chore or recording bars at the beginning.
Best,
Ram
Ram Nagarajan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2002, 08:58 AM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London, UK
Posts: 105
Shame you can't buy pre-blacked tapes like the old days when you could buy pre-formatted floppies for Mac or PC.

Simon & Simon, and both from London. Hi.
Simon Plissi is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:08 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network