Editing with FCPHD and Z1-Newbie Nightmare at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Final Cut Suite
Discussing the editing of all formats with FCS, FCP, FCE


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 12th, 2005, 10:52 AM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 17
Editing with FCPHD and Z1-Newbie Nightmare

Just thought I would share this newbie nightmare with you all. I did my first Z1 shoot this weekend and had to downconvert the HDV to DV for editingin FCPHD. 16:9 downconvert choices in the Z1 were "squeeze", "letterbox" and edge crop. I chose letterbox.

When I captured the footage, FCPHD thought the clips were anamorphic (see anamorphic column in browser) and the image I got squished the people in the shot so they looked rather fat. My end delivery was a DVD that would be seen on a 4:3 consumer TV.

Here was the workflow that worked: (many thanks to hanumang at Apple discussions)

1. Take your original 4:3 sequence, and alter the clips (to non-anamorphic) if you haven't done that already. Then...
2. Select All Clips (Command-A)
3. Remove Attributes (Option-Command-V)
4. Select the Distort property (on the left-hand side, under Video), click OK

I'm not sure what was happening here, but it was a quick fix for a tight deadline.
I know FCP5 will have native HDV real-time editing so I am not stuck with this workflow forever, but this first experience with 16:9 and the ZR1 kept me up for two nights into the wee hours of the morning.

Anybody who is working with FCPHD and the ZR1 should post, because the workflow is not very clear.

P.S. When all was said and done...the footage DID look gorgeous on DVD!!
Cate Poole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 10:56 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cate Poole
Just thought I would share this newbie nightmare with you all. I did my first Z1 shoot this weekend and had to downconvert the HDV to DV for editingin FCPHD. 16:9 downconvert choices in the Z1 were "squeeze", "letterbox" and edge crop. I chose letterbox.

When I captured the footage, FCPHD thought the clips were anamorphic (see anamorphic column in browser) and the image I got squished the people in the shot so they looked rather fat. My end delivery was a DVD that would be seen on a 4:3 consumer TV.

Here was the workflow that worked: (many thanks to hanumang at Apple discussions)

1. Take your original 4:3 sequence, and alter the clips (to non-anamorphic) if you haven't done that already. Then...
2. Select All Clips (Command-A)
3. Remove Attributes (Option-Command-V)
4. Select the Distort property (on the left-hand side, under Video), click OK

I'm not sure what was happening here, but it was a quick fix for a tight deadline.
I know FCP5 will have native HDV real-time editing so I am not stuck with this workflow forever, but this first experience with 16:9 and the ZR1 kept me up for two nights into the wee hours of the morning.

Anybody who is working with FCPHD and the ZR1 should post, because the workflow is not very clear.

P.S. When all was said and done...the footage DID look gorgeous on DVD!!
I don't understand, you wanted the final image to be a normal (non anamorphic) 4:3 frame? Not a letterboxed 4:3 frame?
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 11:03 AM   #3
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 17
Letterbox

_I don't understand, you wanted the final image to be a normal (non anamorphic) 4:3 frame? Not a letterboxed 4:3 frame?_

I did want a letterbox frame, but the letterbox image was distorted.

Frankly, I would like to edit and export the whole thing in 16:9 and let the consumer TVs do the letterboxing. Is that a better workflow?

If it is, then I will have to learn about 16:9 settings in FCPHD.
Cate Poole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 11:45 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Portsmouth, UK
Posts: 611
AFAIK, the 16:9 options in FCP only affect the way it is displayed in the timeline, whereas Compressor actually sets the 16:9 flags for squishing the DVD.

The DVD player sorts out the aspect ratio for 4:3 TVs, not the TV sets themselves (except in a few cases). If properly set up the DVD will automatically resize any 16:9 source on a 4:3 TV. Download in "squeeze" mode, edit in 16;9 and let compressor/DVD-SP make a 16:9 flagged DVD.

It's definitely the way to go for quality AND convenience. Letterbox editing should only be for widescreen VHS production.
__________________
Shorts::Cut - www.shortscut.org.uk
The Short Film Festival for Portsmouth & Southsea.
Dylan Pank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 01:05 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
Yeah, this seems like a huge hassle for nothing.

Just select the widescreen sequence option in FCP and let the camera output an anamorphic signal.

You edit in 16x9 and let the DVD do the letterboxing.

Should you need a 4:3 lettboxed version (which I did for one show for VHS mastering) you can simply put your 16:9 project in a new 4:3 sequence and render it out.
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 02:52 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chicoutimi, Canada
Posts: 334
Interesting,

I already did quite a few DV from HDV sources edit in FCP and it works absolutely fine for me. No distortion or anything. Are you capturing with standard DV NTSC capture or anamorphic? If I want a 4:3 with a letterboxed image, I send the downconvert from the Z1 in letterbox but I make sure I capture in DV NTSC (non anamorphic). My guess is that you captured in DV anamorphic so you had a doubled anamorphic look.
__________________
Eric Bilodeau
video SFX,DOP
___________________
http://www.fictis.net
info@fictis.net
Eric Bilodeau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 03:19 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
I don't see why you'd ever want to output in letterbox for editing.

You can always make your anamorphic 16:9 into a letterboxed 4:3 later.
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2005, 03:33 PM   #8
New Boot
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ocean Grove, NJ
Posts: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan McCullough
I don't see why you'd ever want to output in letterbox for editing.

You can always make your anamorphic 16:9 into a letterboxed 4:3 later.
I think the Sony Z1 letterbox downconvert was where I made my first mistake. I never use camera features that can be done in post. As a 16:9 newbie I am just learning about this format and FCP. I like keeping the 16:9 workflow and letting DVD players handle the letter boxing.
Cate Poole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 14th, 2005, 09:40 PM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 107
if you want to output to 4:3 why are u shooting on 16:9?
Dan Farzad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 14th, 2005, 09:57 PM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Farzad
if you want to output to 4:3 why are u shooting on 16:9?
The reason I do it is because you can't shoot HDV in 4:3. Given the option I'd rather have my footage in HDV than DV, even if I'm going to be delivering in 4:3 SD at first.
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:40 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network