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Old October 24th, 2009, 03:31 PM   #1
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TV versus Monitor picture approximating

Hey guys,

So, we all know that playing back shot footage on a TV gives a very different look compared to playing it on a computer monitor. In general, the TV is brighter, more colour saturated, and just looks "livelier" than the same footage in my NLE (I'm shooting a Sony Z5 with FCP). In short, the footage played back on a TV looks stellar, and in comparison, the computer monitor footage is... well, just "ok".

Now, if I'm producing a DVD or something destined for the living room, I will always go by the TV output, grade for that and there are no problems.

*But* if I'm doing content for online use *only*, I would like to attempt to enhance my footage so it approximates the look of the footage on the TV - so it looks more "lively" for want of a better term.

Are you guys doing something similar to this? If so, what are the techniques you are using?

Do you have a standard workflow, maybe a preset or something that does some combination of brightness/contrast/saturation tweaks?

I'm interested in feedback on this, as I develop my own workflows and techniques best suited for my material.

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Old October 24th, 2009, 04:38 PM   #2
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Hi Ben,

The reason why the picture looks better on the TV is to do with the fact the Z5 records in studio RGB, which is what TV use, compared to computer RGB.

Basically the colour mapping of Studio RGB is 16-235 while Computer RGB is 0-255. This means black (16) on a TV is only dark grey on a monitor as 0 = black on a computer monitor.

To fix this when you want to output to web you need to covert the Studio RGB to Computer RGB. On Sony Vegas this can be done through a preset colour correction effect, although not sure about FCP, I'm sure theres something simular.

Also remember when outputing for viewing on TV remember not to leave 'Computer RGB' on otherwise you will lose detail in the blacks and whites and it will be over saturated.

Sorry this isn't probably the most well explained post, I bet some of what I said isnt 100% correct but hopefully you get the idea. If anyone else wants to correct me on anything feel free, I think I've explained it correctly lol.

P.S Just to add, does anyone know how to set up the Z5 picture profile so that the picture is ready for web? e.g computer RGB. I know it would limit future choice for footage but it maybe handy to speed up the workflow when creating video only for web.
Jonathan Palfrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 24th, 2009, 04:41 PM   #3
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Jonathan - thanks a lot for that, that's really useful info to know.

I will definitely explore this!

So in your material, would you say this is the main thing that you do in order to make the footage as "tv-like" and vibrant as possible? Or do you do other colour corrections as well?
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