FCP newbie needs color correction help at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Final Cut Suite
Discussing the editing of all formats with FCS, FCP, FCE


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 4th, 2005, 07:57 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 58
FCP newbie needs color correction help

I am trying to change the color of an item such as a lamp in my video. Is it possible to change the color of the lamp only? I'm thinking maybe I have to mask the objects that does not need color change? Any help would be great.
Danny Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2005, 10:28 PM   #2
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Mays Landing, NJ
Posts: 11,543
See the tutorial in the FCP manual; there's an example of how to do this exact kind of thing. If you don't have hardcopy then you can access the manual in PDF form via the Help menu inside of FCP. Actually the PDF version is a little better since it has color screenshots whereas the printed manual is black and white. Read the whole section on color correction, it will get you off to a good start!
Boyd Ostroff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2005, 10:48 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
There are many instructions out there on how to do this with Final Cut PRO, which has the 3-way CC with secondary color correction that lets you mask the specific color. Unfortunately FCE doesn't have that filter.

If the lamp is of a solid color, maybe the chroma key in FCE can do something?
You can also do a garbage mask around the lamp, and color correct the masked area. Works only on static shot.

Last edited by Glenn Chan; November 5th, 2005 at 12:42 AM.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 12:40 AM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 63
Since this topic is about color correction, let me throw a question in as well.

I want to color correct a short film shot on 35mm, ending up on digibeta. I want to desaturate specific parts of the movie. I'm gonna desaturate those shots 30%.

At the same tome, since some of the shots don't match, obviously I want to match them as well.

The question is, what should I do first? Try to match them before I apply the desaturation filter? Or apply the desaturation filter, and since it eliminates a lot of the color information anyway, only THEN try to match them.

Any suggestions?
Mike Medavoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2005, 12:59 AM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Mike: It's better to start your own thread so your question will get the attention it deserves. :)

Anyways, to answer your question:

The way I would do things:

Apply a 3-way CC filter first to make all the shots match, then after it apply another 3-way CC filter to desaturate. The normal color helps to match shots up (I find). i.e. boost color saturation quickly by clicking on the slider. This can help you spot white balance errors if you aren't sure about your monitoring. And then toggle it back to normal saturation.

For the desaturation filter, I would use the secondary controls so it affects everything except for flesh tone. The flesh tone will look more natural that way. It also has another benefit in that it'll work better for television/broadcast audiences.

Some consumer televisions have boosted color saturation, so they would actually make your image look like it has normal saturation. If you leave the flesh tones alone then it will kind of retain the desaturated look, since the background looks desaturated in relationship to your subjects. It'll look wrong in a subtle way, which may be the effect you're going after.

If you do lower saturation in the flesh tones, then it'll look like the picture has normal saturation and there will be no effect. This may be ok since it's hard to hit both audiences (people with normal TVs, and people with super-saturated TVs) at once. Or it may not be ok.

In FCP's 3-way CC, secondary = limit effect.

I hope that helps.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2005, 03:13 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Medavoy
Since this topic is about color correction, let me throw a question in as well.

I want to color correct a short film shot on 35mm, ending up on digibeta. I want to desaturate specific parts of the movie. I'm gonna desaturate those shots 30%.

At the same tome, since some of the shots don't match, obviously I want to match them as well.

The question is, what should I do first? Try to match them before I apply the desaturation filter? Or apply the desaturation filter, and since it eliminates a lot of the color information anyway, only THEN try to match them.

Any suggestions?
i suggest you do as glenn said with a first pass to color match all of your shots. afterwards, work on one clip to get it as perfect as you'd like, then use "paste attributes" on the rest of the sequence to finish up.
A.J. Briones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2005, 11:42 AM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 63
Thank you very much,

I will follow the road you mentioned.

I was actually planning to use Color Finesse for color correction, I know it much better than the FCP CC capabilities. And for me, it gives a bit more control.

But advice taken, will match the shots first, then work on the desaturation. I will try to implement the advice about the flesh tones as well and see if i like the result, thanks.
Mike Medavoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2005, 02:27 PM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 58
Boyd/Glenn, thx..since there are several tutorials which one is best?
Danny Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2005, 02:33 PM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Danny: I do not believe there is a tutorial on how to do that particular effect in FCE.

The manual should have information on how to use the garbage matte though. If 4 or 8 points isn't enough, there are filters out there that will give more points. I think one of them is free.
http://homepage.mac.com/tomhenderson/beziermatte/
http://www.digitalzoo.com.au/lunchti...ed_02_free.htm

The steps are something like:
1- Duplicate a clip onto itself. Hold shift, command, option, apple key and click drag a video clip onto another layer. You only need two of the modifiers, I forget which ones were unnecessary (option is necessary IIRC).
2- Apply the color corrector and garbage matter filters.
3- Mask out the object.
4- Drag the color wheel in the CC filter.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Apple / Mac Post Production Solutions > Final Cut Suite

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:47 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network