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General HD (720 / 1080) Acquisition
Topics about HD production.


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Old September 29th, 2009, 11:21 AM   #16
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The last ten years in the camera space have been a tightrope walk with HD coming into play.

Hopefully playback and broadcast standards will stay in place for some time to come to get decent mileage from our gear.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 07:40 AM   #17
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Hd

I find it interesting that nothing has been said in this thread about the actual camera persons, lighting person, etc. skills. I believe these people can literally ruin the image the most expensive camera produces, making the most expensive camera look about as good as a $800.00 "cheapy".

I have seen a national TV production in Australia, that missed the point of a dance competition by just sticking bits together, and not giving any thought to having the dancers dance in time to the music.
If people making unqualified statement about expensive cameras made that type of statements about a fast car one would instantly assume that they were short of a few inches where it really counts, maybe it is similar for camera operators and they need the extra bit of camera for security.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 08:06 AM   #18
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They usually use the tools that their budget allows, the more expensive cameras usually have features that allow you to do the job with more precision.

There hacks in all professions and film and TV is no different. It's also a very insecure business, so there are lots of strange comfort blankets, not just certain brands of camera, but brands of lens cleaning cloths etc.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 02:47 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post
They usually use the tools that their budget allows, the more expensive cameras usually have features that allow you to do the job with more precision.

There hacks in all professions and film and TV is no different. It's also a very insecure business, so there are lots of strange comfort blankets, not just certain brands of camera, but brands of lens cleaning cloths etc.
I like your description of "doing the job with more precision". In my view, the quality of a completed video is 80% the person doing it and 20% the equipment. A good shooter knows how to properly use very high-end equipment - - AND is also able to recognize and work within the limitations of more limited equipment. The best equipment is never a minus but a good shooter can do terrific work even with very modest equipment. A poor shooter could have the best equipment that exists but the results would still be poor.

Many times I have noticed that a true professional doesn't need to make the types of comments that the OP referred to when he mentioned the comment he heard the "pro" make to a helicopter pilot. A true pro is secure in his professional status and doesn't need to make these types of cracks that are intended to reinforce his "pro" status to his listener / victim. A case in point: Some of the members of this forum are the best there are yet they are very courteous and helpful to those who are obvious novices. To me, people like that stand very tall (and I'm not talking about their height.)

Last edited by Jim Snow; October 6th, 2009 at 03:33 PM.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 04:45 PM   #20
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I like your description of "doing the job with more precision". In my view, the quality of a completed video is 80% the person doing it and 20% the equipment. A good shooter knows how to properly use very high-end equipment - - AND is also able to recognize and work within the limitations of more limited equipment. The best equipment is never a minus but a good shooter can do terrific work even with very modest equipment. A poor shooter could have the best equipment that exists but the results would still be poor.
Pros work with all kinds of equipment depending on what they're working on. Good ones are also a pretty demanding bunch and often express strong views about kit. They're enthusiastic about what they're doing, innovative, often extremely helpful. The precision requirement can be the difference between someone keeping or losing their job on a production that has the budget to afford the expensive camera kit.

I think people should remember that in the end these comments that this cameraman made weren't personal and referred to a video format. Unfortunately, I've heard a lot more personal stuff said to and about people on film & TV sets and that, I suspect, is something that isn't unique to the film & TV industry. I'm not defending this particular cameraman, but it's actually no worse an opinion as you'd hear expressed about cars, motor bikes, computers (or their operating system) or any other piece of equipment. Certainly, the BBC currently regard HDV as a SD format in their guidelines, together with Super 16, so he could've just been relaying that snippet.

I mentioned near the beginning of the thread that HDV is regarded as HD, but with that broadcaster qualification. I also hope I'm helpful to novices.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 06:02 PM   #21
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I also hope I'm helpful to novices.
Very much so. I always appreciate the insight that you bring to the forum. Thanks for taking the time to contribute.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #22
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Some of the members of this forum are the best there are yet they are very courteous and helpful to those who are obvious novices. To me, people like that stand very tall (and I'm not talking about their height.)
I'd second that, Jim. Can't believe how much I've learned from the generous people here.
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Old October 7th, 2009, 08:34 AM   #23
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I believe that this completes the picture, thank you all.
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Old October 7th, 2009, 08:53 AM   #24
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Pros work with all kinds of equipment depending on what they're working on. Good ones are also a pretty demanding bunch and often express strong views about kit.
As an addendum to a VERY complete summary, I'd like to add as well that a lot of SEASONED pros (the ones who have some grey in their hair because they've been doing this 20+ years) are only familiar with the form factor that comes with "broadcast" cameras (ie. the shoulder cams) and struggle to make menus and touch screens and PL lens adaptors and the like work.

A LOT of talented individuals who have been at this for some time (and some younger folks who have only ever worked with the aforementioned "broadcast" cameras) only know the common switchgear placement of the "industry standard". I'm a hybrid - I'm comfortable with either BUT my "handicam" form factor comfort is limited to a small number of Sony cameras (PD150/170, Z1, EX1) - ask me to shoot a compact Panasonic P2 and I'm NOT going to perform anywhere near peak REGARDLESS of how good the glass or codec is.
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Old October 8th, 2009, 09:20 PM   #25
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I have followed your posts with obvious interest and it has been very enlightening. Thanks for your insights.
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