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Old May 13th, 2010, 06:19 AM   #16
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You can use an XLR-to-miniplug cable, too. I've used the one that came with my Sennheiser G2 wireless system and it worked fine. I don't know how it would work with other mics, though. I 'd be curious to know how it would work with a mic on a boom with a longer cable. (If anyone is interested, I think I have a 25' XLR-to-miniplug cable that I never used that I'd be willing to try out and report back.)

I'll vouch for the Juiced Link adapter. Mine worked very well when I got it, but I haven't used it in the field. I bought it for my older HV20 to use multiple mics, but soon after bought an XH-1A so it was only used for a little testing. I'm not an audio pro, but the sound seemed pretty clean to me.
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Old May 13th, 2010, 11:07 AM   #17
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Unless you've already got an XLR microphone, why not just use a Rode Videomic on the HV40? That's what I use on my two HV30s. My XLR mics go with my XHA1.

I almost always record audio separately on my H4N recorder, synch up in post, and then delete the cameras audio anyway. I just use the waveform from the audio from the camera to synch with the audio from the DAT, then delete the camera audio entirely.

Of course, for interviews you may want a wireless setup.

But for an HV40, the Rode Videomic will do a good job. The price is good for the quality you get. It also looks good on the HV, especially with a lens hood on the front of the camera. With paying clients, appearance DOES matter.

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Old May 13th, 2010, 11:08 AM   #18
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With a budget of $1,000 and the fact this would be my only camera, I would go with a Canon HV40, a Juicedlink/BeachTek adapter and a decent tripod. I'd buy used where possible, but the HV40 is at a real nice price right now at B&H.

DSLRs are nice (I have a Panasonic GH1) but I wouldn't want it to be my only video camera.
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Old May 13th, 2010, 08:15 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Van Duyn View Post
Unless you've already got an XLR microphone, why not just use a Rode Videomic on the HV40? That's what I use on my two HV30s. My XLR mics go with my XHA1.

I almost always record audio separately on my H4N recorder, synch up in post, and then delete the cameras audio anyway. I just use the waveform from the audio from the camera to synch with the audio from the DAT, then delete the camera audio entirely.

Of course, for interviews you may want a wireless setup.

But for an HV40, the Rode Videomic will do a good job. The price is good for the quality you get. It also looks good on the HV, especially with a lens hood on the front of the camera. With paying clients, appearance DOES matter.

Roger
The mic most used on my HV40 is a Sennheiser MKE300 which is similar to the Rode Videomic, but I think Rode is probably a better mic. If it wasn't so darned big (!), I'd have gone with Rode, too. They appear to be very popular with people whose opinions are well respected. (Like Roger, of course.) I thought the mono only sound would be a problem, but frankly, no one notices when I simply send it to both channels.

Roger, how difficult is it to sync the H4N? Obviously, you'd want it to be perfect. I'm asking because I have an H4 and am thinking very hard about getting a Canon T2i or 7D. I used to do a lot of photography when traveling, but do less because I have more fun with video and hate carrying too much gear -- especially in places where I don'treally want to advertise that I have much gear. Still, if I could do both with one camera it would cut down what I travel with on personal trips. I'm concerned about the AGC issues with HDSLR's, but syncing would deal with that and allow the use of quality mics, too. This is all uncharted territory for me, but I think it's a good idea to learn!
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Old June 1st, 2010, 10:26 AM   #20
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now here's a question, would I be better buying the Canon HV40 or a DSLR like the Canon 7d or the T2i?

I mainly want this for school projects, short narratives, nothing over 15 minutes or so. What would be a better invesment for my situation?
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 10:33 PM   #21
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DSLR all the way, provided your computer has a pretty "stout" processor, or you would upgrade it. I have both a 7D and a newly acquired T2i; I also have a pair of Canon HF100's but find I am using them less and less (fine working HD cameras though they are) due to the better lens options on the DSLR's.

As mentioned above, separate audio recorder is necessary as even with stereo mic jacks the audio is a bit "crippled" by AGC (Automatic Gain Control)
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 11:28 AM   #22
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hmm, ok, any reccomended lenses for shooting HD video on DSLRs?
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 12:11 PM   #23
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hmm, ok, any reccomended lenses for shooting HD video on DSLRs?
There goes your $1,000 budget... :)
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 02:32 PM   #24
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There goes your $1,000 budget... :)
Hahaha yeah, thats why I wanted to stay away from DSLRs
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 05:57 PM   #25
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If you're shooting narratives, then the $100- EF 50/1.8 will do just fine. Even the basic kit 18-55IS lens is fine for that.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 07:50 PM   #26
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If you're shooting narratives, then the $100- EF 50/1.8 will do just fine. Even the basic kit 18-55IS lens is fine for that.
do you need to use a 35mm Lens Adapter to use these lenses on a DSLR or can you just attach them like a normal lens?
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Old June 4th, 2010, 08:44 AM   #27
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The Canon EF lenses will work on all the current Canon dSLR camera's. They attach like any regular lens on an SLR.
The EF-S lenses will work on the Canon cameras with the smaller 1.6-crop sensors, like the T2i, but not on the larger sensor cameras like the 5DII or the pro 1-series.
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Old June 11th, 2010, 11:03 AM   #28
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So after selling a few things on ebay I gathered enough to purchase a Canon 7D at a reasonable price from Penn Camera

Can anyone recommend the best settings for video since I'm a beginner to this camera? I have a EF-S 60mm 2.8 Macro and a EF 50mm 1.8 Lens, I have a Telephoto lens also
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Old June 11th, 2010, 09:46 PM   #29
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Settings for video on 7D

Settings for video:

Dial on top set to MANUAL, else you will be in full auto regardless of what settings you think you have made.

Shutter to 1/60th (most of the time) to allow a normal looking amount of motion blur

Aperture as desired for Depth Of Field the scene requires. Shallow to concentrate on subject (portrait perspective) or deep for action, depth in the scene etc, or something in between. Neutral density filters may be required in bright lighting to keep everything in range.

ISO to AUTO temporarily to see what ISO the camera will try to set for the settings you've dialed in above, then set that ISO manually and adjust up or down from there for desired exposure effect. Exposure will then be LOCKED and will not change on you as you pan from one brightness level to another (this is the way I want it, if an exposure change is needed I stop the recording, change camera position/angle to avoid an awkward "cut", readjust exposure with ISO, then start another "scene").

If you leave the ISO on AUTO you will have your camera trying to react to changes in brightness and you most likely do not want that. Looks amatuerish.

While you're adjusting exposure with ISO you do have the ISO "table" occupying much of the LCD area and you may have to judge exposure changes with the area outside the "table", or press the shutter button partway to "kill" the ISO "table" and look at the whole screen. Press the ISO button again to resume adjusting ISO.

One item you definitely will need is some kind of LCD viewfinder loupe. I use 2, the CAVISION viewfinder assembly with mounting plate, swingaway adapter, and a "riser" plate to get the camera up in line with the loupe; the CAVISION has a 6x eyepiece and mine ran about $240 shipped from Canada.

Another option I use is the Hoodman Hoodloupe 3.0 ($79.95) with the extra 3x eyepiece ($39.95) and for now I hold it on with a long rubber band from a package of those purchased at Office Depot. There are other options for varying prices but SOMETHING along this line is absolutely necessary.

Hoodman Corporation

Watch out you don't confuse the Hoodeye 3.0 with the Hoodloupe Mag 3.0. The Hoodeye is nothing but a rubber eye shield and has no optics.
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Old June 12th, 2010, 03:11 PM   #30
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As far as a DSLR rig goes, what would you all recommend?
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