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JVC Everio GZ-HD and GZ-HM Series
JVC's Everio Series 3CCD High Definition MPEG2 camcorders.


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Old May 26th, 2008, 06:42 PM   #1
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My vimeo page

Well I've finally got a few vids up on the old vimeo page. Trying to learn how to get good DOF shots. Harder than it looks. I wouldn't mind some constructive critiqe. My workflow from the HD7 is- copy files from the camera, change the tod to m2t and import into Avid Liquid. I have been using an HDV timeline mostly because I didn't think there would be that much difference in 1920 and 1440 and my second camera we use is a GL2 so then I have to use an SD 16:9 timeline and they play together nicely. But my next video will be FHD @ 1920.

Give a look and let me know but be gentle I am just feeling out this new camera.

http://www.vimeo.com/1070213
http://www.vimeo.com/969595
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Old May 27th, 2008, 06:46 PM   #2
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That is a beautiful shot of a beautiful couple. Nicely done.

You should look far a sales job with JVC ... you just finally sold me on the HD7.
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Old May 29th, 2008, 05:16 PM   #3
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Thanks

O wow thanks, yeah I'm really getting to like this little camera. Things I'v e found out are it's really easy to overexpose outside when your running manual, and I'm doing that a lot just to learn. Also HD is not very forgiving on focus, if your out the tiniest bit it shows right up. Very glad I have Steve's excellent book, it really helped me get up to speed fast.
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Old May 29th, 2008, 05:30 PM   #4
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Are you using the zebra pattern for setting your exposure?
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Old May 30th, 2008, 05:19 PM   #5
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Very nice work !! I love my HD7. Keep up the work

Len
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Old June 5th, 2008, 06:05 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Jeff Nyman View Post
... my second camera we use is a GL2 so then I have to use an SD 16:9 timeline and they play together nicely. But my next video will be FHD @ 1920.
I may have to do this this weekend, with a GL1. So, you set up a 16x9 timeline/project. How does the HD fit in the space? Do you scale it down?
I'm using Final Cut, but I suspect the workflow is basically the same.
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Old June 5th, 2008, 07:05 PM   #7
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Liquid doesn't care what the source is, you can use all sorts of different footage and it will render it to the timeline's specs. I just set up an NTSC 16:9 timeline and make sure the GL1 is shooting widescreen. Kinda sucks everything looks "squished" while your shooting. Then on my HD footage I just have to set the property to "Fit largest keep aspect" and it scales it down to SD as I go. Just have to do a little color correction here and there to get both cameras to match.

And no I haven't used the zebra function yet for exposure which is quite stupid of me, thanks for the tip.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 10:36 PM   #8
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And no I haven't used the zebra function yet for exposure which is quite stupid of me, thanks for the tip.
Thanks, for the response. Although I haven't done this, FCP should manage similarly.

I used to despise zebras, but that was because I didn't really understand how to use them effectively. Zebras react when any part of an image is beyond 100% white. Some cameras allow adjusting zebra to as low as, I think, 70%. Superwhite is 110%, but essentially a useless measurement for video, unless your only objective is viewing on a computer. My experience suggests 100% is a good choice, provided the quantity of zebra is kept to a minimum in the viewfinder. If one can see texture in white, which means something less than 100% in most of the image, then exposure settings will be usable in post production,
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Old June 7th, 2008, 08:09 PM   #9
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I was only asking for the Zebra, because I wonder when white starts blowing out, and if the zebra is an appropr ... abropr ... aprobri .... ehm if it helps to prevent blow outs.... I wish I had soething like that in my still camera...
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Old June 7th, 2008, 08:16 PM   #10
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I was only asking for the Zebra, because I wonder when white starts blowing out, and if the zebra is an appropr ... abropr ... aprobri .... ehm if it helps to prevent blow outs.... I wish I had soething like that in my still camera...
It is very useful, but some time if we follow Zebra then picture become too dark! Off course we able to manage proper light while using it!

Kaushik
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Old June 8th, 2008, 02:43 AM   #11
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I read somewhere, a long time ago, that one way to get used to the zebra is to put the camera in auto for a while as a test and watch what the zebra does. Then change to manual and start shooting.
Seemed like good advice.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 10:31 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Kaushik Parmar View Post
It is very useful, but some time if we follow Zebra then picture become too dark! Off course we able to manage proper light while using it!

Kaushik
I prefer the footage a little darker. You rarely can pull out details from over exposed whites, while there is a lot of leeway in shadows.
The eye is always drawn into the brightest part of a picture, shadows go mostly disregarded (if you don't under expose too much).
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