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Old June 26th, 2008, 11:28 AM   #1
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How to see infared with GYHD-100?

Is their a filter or a way to see infared with the GYHD-100 Thanks Gary Williams
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Old June 26th, 2008, 01:33 PM   #2
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You might try recording in B&W with an "A" (dark red) filter over the lens. You could then tint the B&W image in post to what ever adds to the effect. An "A" filter should be available from a photo store and will come close to delivering an infrared effect. Infrared film itself is almost exclusively sensitive to the infrared wave length, that is just below red in the radiation spectrum. The "A" filter shot in B&W approaches the infrared look.
Also, you could try a true infrared filter (an almost opaque deep red filter) with the GY-HD100, however the image would probably be very dark, since the CCD is most likely not very sensitive to the infrared frequency.
You could try one of these approaches and see if it works for you.
Good luck,

Ken
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Old June 26th, 2008, 01:42 PM   #3
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P. S.

If you are looking to "see at night" a'la a true infrared night vision camera I don't have an answer for the GY-HD100. In this case I would suggest buying or renting an infrared camera.

Ken
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Old June 26th, 2008, 06:44 PM   #4
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there are night vision imagers / intensifiers that go between lens and camera. can be rented. the camera will see the IR of a TV remote or IR LEDs, but I don't think thats what you were looking for.
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Old June 27th, 2008, 11:54 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Oakley View Post
there are night vision imagers / intensifiers that go between lens and camera. can be rented. the camera will see the IR of a TV remote or IR LEDs, but I don't think thats what you were looking for.
Sonys new cameras have whats called night shot it sees infared at night what I am trying to find out, is their a way to do the same thing to the GYHD-100UA with a filter of some type on the end or is their alot more to sonys new night shot cameras. I want to ge able to see the infared light spectrum with my camera. Thanks Gary Williams
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Old June 27th, 2008, 12:26 PM   #6
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what the little sony cameras are doing is _removing_ a IR pass filter which is in front of the CCD. they are not adding anything. its possible that the JVC CCD has a IR filter on its front, I don't know.maybe the service manual has more info. it would need to be removed and then the camera could see IR. you would need to replace the IR filter with a clear glass spacer so the optical path was still the same length. this is assuming its on the front of the CCD block where it could be removed. if its in front of the chips, it can't be done because that would entail removing the chips from the optical block and only the factory can glue chips back onto the block.

however, that still doesn't make it night vision. perhaps at 18db and slow shutter you might get something, combined with IR LEDs. to try this would certainly be risking destroying the CCD block which will set you back $1k to replace just for the part.

there is NO filter you can add which will give ANY camera night vision. to do that requires an IR image intensifier unit which is actually bringing IR in on the front, and converting it to visible light the CCD's can see. to do that requires an optical frequency converter.

thats how it works, you can't change the laws of physics. why not just use one of those sony cameras if it does what you need.... or rent a IR image intensifier for the JVC
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Old June 27th, 2008, 12:33 PM   #7
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As far as I know all CCD's have IR shielding as it helps to produce better images for non-IR scenarios. In the Sony cameras they simply let you remove this...and the fact that no-one else does it to, makes me think they've also got patents on making a 'removable' shield. If you could remove the shielding on the JVC that sits in front of the sensor it would produce IR sensitive images but of course it would be difficult to do I guess without making a mess of things.

So no help really but as I'd done a lot of reading on this 6 months back I thought I'd share.
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Old June 27th, 2008, 12:34 PM   #8
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The Sony cameras with Nightshot have an IR emitter on them that is "seen" by the camera in its Nightshot mode.
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Old June 27th, 2008, 01:33 PM   #9
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Yeah, its a single IR LED that is next to useless unless your within about a foot of the cemera.

I put together a bank of 140 (i think) IR LEDs along with a 3000mah battery and its very good to about 40-50feet. Cost me about 50 total.
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Old June 27th, 2008, 02:00 PM   #10
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Mat, you frighten me... <tongue planted firmly in cheek>
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Old June 29th, 2008, 05:41 AM   #11
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for those less technically inclined or time poor I seem to remember litepanel making ir led versions of their mini and 1ft x 1ft panels . A lot pricier no doubt but hot to trot . Still need the camera end sorted though .
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Old June 29th, 2008, 06:33 AM   #12
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The appliance referred to above is the Electrophysics Corp Astroscope which is a modular system based on Gen 3 commercial spec tube based intensifiers.

There likely is a JVC GY-HD--- system.

The Astroscope for ENG style cameras usually adds a module between the original camera lens mount and the ENG lens and may incorporate an electrical relay system for lenses which are controlled by circuits routed via the lens mount.

Aside from Electrophysics Corp's own website, the Australian website for Military and Law Enforcement Technologies has a lot of handy information.

Intensified tube based near infrared to video apparently hits a real world resolution wall at about 400 TV lines for the Gen 3.

The Gen 2+ systems based on Photonis tubes apparently have potentially a higher resolution.

I have hacked the Pyser PNP-HG Gen 2 onto the PD150 via a home made optical relay similar to groundglass relay (35mm groundglass adaptor) and used it on a Z1 with adequate but not outstanding results at full frame.

Rather than hack a perfectly good camcorder, a better option is to look for CCTV cams used for security. There is a B/W version based on a Sony HAD CCD which has a claimed 700 TV lines of resolution and will port via composite into a camcorder or deck. These work quite well with IR assistance and have been used on several wildlife documentaries.

In Australia they are marketed and installed by NESS under their own brand. The OEM is Kampro, believed to be in Taiwan.
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Old July 12th, 2008, 08:35 PM   #13
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Night vision adapters for hd-100

Dose anyone know of a company that makes at least a generation 3 night vision adapter for the HD-100? Thanks in advance Gary Williams
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Old July 12th, 2008, 08:44 PM   #14
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Hi Gary............

You mean something like this?

http://www.optics4birding.com/item.aspx?cid=13315

or this?

http://www.ownthenight.com/catalog/c10_p1.html


CS

Last edited by Chris Soucy; July 12th, 2008 at 08:47 PM. Reason: +
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Old July 13th, 2008, 01:49 AM   #15
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Yes but I want one the mounts on the HD-100.
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