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Old July 1st, 2008, 08:20 AM   #1
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ProHD DVD PLAYER SRDVD-100U

Does anyone know if a 240v version has ever been released in the UK ?

I asked JVC the question around 18 months ago whilst in the head office and nobody had even heard of it :-/
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Old July 1st, 2008, 10:21 AM   #2
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Yes the specs say up to 240V at 50Hz. There is no alternate version. Was it ever released in the UK? I don't know. I don't see why not.

http://pro.jvc.com/prof/attributes/s...&feature_id=03

BTW, if you can't find a SR-DVD100, the Sony PS3 plays m2t files created by the ProHD cameras beautifully.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 02:55 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood View Post
... the Sony PS3 plays m2t files created by the ProHD cameras beautifully.
Thanks, Tim. You just showed me the error of my ways! I did an unsuccessful test last week on a friend's set-up (PS3 hooked up to an HD projector). But, now that I think about it, I had the .m2ts in QuickTime wrappers. D'oh!

So I imagine that the correct workflow (FCP) to play an edited sequence on PS3 would be:
1/ Render the native sequence in the timeline.
2/ Export the timeline to a ProHD camera or deck using the Print to Video command.
3/ Open DVHSCap (or similar), playback the tape and capture the .m2t file with DVHSCap.
4/ Burn the resultant .m2t onto a single or dual-layer DVD-R or Blu-Ray disc.

By my rough calculation, a one hour tape would create an .m2t file of 8.86 GB, and a DVD-R DL rated at 8.5 GB would roughly have an actual capacity of 7.9 GB. So you could export and play a sequence up to 53 minutes long using this method. Not bad.
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Old July 2nd, 2008, 01:19 PM   #4
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the ps3 plays JVC transport streams natively eh?

I'll have to try that tonight. I have some 24p 16mm film xfer to test with.

I'm going to try it though through TVersity (media server) as long as
the ps3 supports the codec it won't transcode.


I will post here again to let you know how it went.
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Old July 2nd, 2008, 06:34 PM   #5
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I tested some .m2t files last night on my friend's PS3 and HD projector (and these ones were NOT in QuickTime wrappers). To Tim's earlier description of "beautifully", I would simply add the word "gorgeous" as to how good they looked.

My friend said that he hadn't realized just how good his HD projector really was until he saw this footage. He felt it projected better (had a better look) than his existing Blu-ray movies. (I'm assuming that his Hollywood Blu-ray titles were transcoded into H.264 or similar rather than MPEG-2 Transport Stream.) I'm simply relaying his comment about it.

I now consider this (playing a "native camera" .m2t file on Blu-ray to an HD projector) to be the current "Gold Standard" for displaying ProHD footage. Or at least it'll be the most commonplace and affordable Gold Standard. A lot of people are now installing HD projectors and Blu-ray/PS3 players in their home theatres, so it's less and less difficult to find a friend or associate who has that set-up.

Afterwards, I did another experiment with ProHD footage. My suggested workflow (in the post above) for exporting an FCP sequence to the camera to get rid of the QuickTime wrapper with a minimum of degradation (and totally based on some instructions Tim kindly gave me last year), is totally restricted by the tape length of about 60 minutes. So I was thinking that, if you have a two hour feature, how would you get it (from two separate, hour-long .m2t files) into one big file? My steps were:
1/ Open MPEG Streamclip.
2/ Click "Open Files", highlight both of the .m2t files you wish to join together and click "Open".
3/ They will then both appear on the MPEG Streamclip timeline, one after the other.
4/ Apply "Fix Timecode Breaks". This will "join" the two .m2ts together.
5/ Click File>Save As... , enter the name of your joined sequence and click Save.
6/ This will create a .ts file and, hopefully, it hasn't re-encoded the whole thing, just the point where you made the join. And, if you made the join at the point in the movie where there is a Fade to Black, hopefully the audience won't even notice it.
7/ Change the ".ts" file extension to ".m2t".

I did this and it played back just fine on a VLC player but I haven't had a chance to try it on the PS3 yet.

The ProHD users who edit on Premiere Pro should have a much easier time as I understand that their timeline is simply an .m2t file with no "wrapper" (such as QuickTime or WMV) so, if that is true, then I guess they can export their full-length movie in one go as an .m2t file without having to resort to the camera or deck or MPEG Streamclip.

But I'm continuing my experiments with SheerVideo as a projection codec for ProHD footage (because I'm concerned about quality losses when color-correcting, etc. if you stay in native HDV with the constant re-encoding with MPEG-2). But now I can project a clip with the SheerVideo set-up (not Blu-ray) and immediately compare it to my new Gold Standard (the same clip as a camera-native .m2t file played on PS3 to an HD projector). If the SheerVideo clip doesn't seem to "measure up" then I know I've still got bugs to work out on my workflow.

If you're a ProHD owner or shooter, you should give yourself a big treat and burn some .m2t files of your favorite clips onto a DVD-R and then find someone with a PS3-HD projector set-up.

If you haven't already done it, it will give you an even fuller appreciation of the power of the images you shoot with ProHD.
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Old July 3rd, 2008, 02:33 PM   #6
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I tested out the .m2t stream from my HD100 on the ps3.

Looked fabulous!

But instead of having the streams on a Blu-Ray data disc, all I
did was stream it live over firewire 400 external drive connected
to my pc running the free media server "TVersity". I added the
external drive as a media share and it showed up and played
perfectly on the ps3.

This was running through a 100BT switch and it never skipped or had playback issues.
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Old July 3rd, 2008, 02:44 PM   #7
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I usually use NullRiver's Medialink on my Mac to stream directly to the PS3. (Doesn't always work so well with WiFi 802.11g - hard wired is better.)

BTW, the SR-DVD100 can handle standard DVD-ROM with m2t at 19.2mbps (HDV1 - 720p) or 25mbps (HDV2 1080i) but the PS3 seems to only be able to handle 19.2mbps from a DVD-ROM. It can play 25mbps files fine from the hard drive or network, just not read them fast enough from a DVD.
This is why I can play a DVD-ROM of JVC m2t on the PS3, but not a DVD-ROM of m2t from the Sony Z7. At least you can view Z7 dailies on the PS3 directly from the CF card.

The PS3 also plays DivX, WMV and mp4. (run the latest firmware updates.)

I'm totally off topic now but PS3 firmware version 2.40 (to be released within the next day or so) will finally allow in-game (and I assume in-movie) access to the XMB. http://blog.us.playstation.com/2008/...art-1-the-xmb/
for more info.
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Old July 3rd, 2008, 05:21 PM   #8
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David,

BR-HD50 can accept standard size cassesttes (as opposed to mini) so you can avoid the "stitching" of files.
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Old July 3rd, 2008, 05:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Ferar View Post
David,

BR-HD50 can accept standard size cassesttes (as opposed to mini) so you can avoid the "stitching" of files.
That's very good to know. Thanks for the tip, Justin.
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Old July 4th, 2008, 12:41 AM   #10
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hey Tim, sony just pulled the 2.4 ps3 firmware, apparently a lot of them got bricked as a result.

the codec support in the ps3 is incredible though, it plays everything I throw at it, well except one nitpick, it won't decode windows medi with the pro audio codec and there's loads of content out there with it.
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