HZ-CA13U + GY-HD 110u? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > JVC ProHD & MPEG2 Camera Systems > JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems

JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems
GY-HD 100 & 200 series ProHD HDV camcorders & decks.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 23rd, 2009, 09:21 AM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 24
HZ-CA13U + GY-HD 110u?

This is my first post and I hope I don't sound stupid in it. I've been reading a lot about the new HZ-CA13U PL lens mount on this forum but all anyone seemed to talk about was using it with the GY-HD 200 and 250. Are these the only cameras the adapter fits to?

I use a 110u and was wondering if it fit. It seems to me that they are all 1/3 mount so there shouldn't be any difference. Maybe I'm missing some info about camera mechanics that make the adapter unsuitable for the 110u.
Juan Pablo Ramirez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 23rd, 2009, 10:36 AM   #2
Sponsor: MTF Services
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London UK
Posts: 80
Hi Juan, welcome to the forum.

Not a stupid question at all.

Mechanically, that adaptor should fit not only all of the GY-HD series 100 up to 250, but, in theory, also the new GY-HM 700, the Sony Z7, S270 and the Panasonic HPX 300.

However, the optics may have been designed specifically to work with the JVC's beamsplitter.
It will work with the other cameras, but I couldn't say how well.

Hope this helps.
__________________
Mike Tapa
http://www.mtfservices.com
Mike Tapa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2009, 12:35 AM   #3
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,637
The HZ-CA13U will work fine with the HD100 or HD110, BUT the image will be rotated 180 degrees. The HD200, HD250, HM700 and Panasonic HPX300 all have a built-in feature to unrotate the image, the JVC HD100/110, Sony Z270 and Z7 do not.

I actually shot a film with the HZ-CA13U and a Sony Z7 (needed something more compact) but we mounted the Z7 upside down. You could also just use an on-board monitor with x/y flip or rotate the monitor. The footage will still need to be rotated in post though.
__________________
Tim Dashwood
Tim Dashwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 24th, 2009, 09:39 AM   #4
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 24
Thanks guys for the help. Do you know if there is anyone renting these out in San Diego?
Juan Pablo Ramirez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 05:28 AM   #5
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,637
I don't know about San Diego but Birns & Sawyer has it in their rental inventory.
Camera Rentals - HD Accessories
__________________
Tim Dashwood
Tim Dashwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 06:08 AM   #6
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 24
Thanks, Tim. I will be renting it soon but I can't find a really cheap set of 16mm primes. I want to rent some lenses but not a whole set. What are some good focal lengths to use for a first time prime lens user? I've only worked with the stock zoom lens but never with primes. I'm having trouble figuring out why one should use primes so I thought a good way to learn was to use them. Can you give me any advice on this?
Juan Pablo Ramirez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 07:16 AM   #7
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,637
If I were limited to only rent 3 lenses for a cinema shoot with the HZ-CA13U I would get the 8mm for really wide shots, 16mm as a "normal" lens (use for all shots of actors and just move the camera closer for close-ups,) and a 50mm for inserts (and setting the backfocus.)

The three primary advantages of primes over zooms are:
  1. Less optical elements means fewer optical aberrations
  2. Faster (even though you won't require lenses faster than F/2.8)
  3. Very little breathing when rack focusing

I would suggest you ask your local rental houses if they have some old 16mm PL primes for rent (not super-16) so you can test your new camera with the adapter. If you have your own insurance they will probably rent them for next to nothing. 16mm coverage is not in high demand since most older Arri 16mm cameras have been converted to super-16.

You should also rent a clip-on 4x4 matte box/lens hood and some filters. Try Linear Polarizer (works fine with the JVC CCDs), Promist 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, and ND6 and ND1.2 to combine with the internal ND filters so you can open the aperture up when you are outside on a bright day.
__________________
Tim Dashwood
Tim Dashwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 07:54 PM   #8
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 24
How do I get my own insurance? I was asking one guy to rent his Cooke Sr II primes but he asked if I had insurance. I don't. Why do I need it and how do I get it?
Juan Pablo Ramirez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2009, 09:09 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia (formerly Winnipeg, Manitoba) Canada
Posts: 4,087
Juan: the insurance is in case you drop, scratch or "misplace" his lenses. A set of Cookes is more than most of us paid for the cars we are driving and I wouldn't let anyone borrow my vehicle without a driver's license.

You SHOULD be able to go down to an insurance broker and explain what you need and they should be able to help you out. It won't be cheap, but it's certainly worthwhile ESPECIALLY if something happens...
__________________
Shaun C. Roemich Road Dog Media - Vancouver, BC - Videographer - Webcaster
www.roaddogmedia.ca Blog: http://roaddogmedia.wordpress.com/
Shaun Roemich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2009, 02:31 PM   #10
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 3,637
"Production Insurance" usually also covers liability which is required if you ever plan to get city permits for shooting. In Canada most cities require a minimum of $2,000,000 liability insurance before granting a shooting permit (whether it is to shoot in the streets, public parks, or just parking permits for the trucks and honeywagons.) I assume most U.S. cities have similar policies.

My policy costs about $2500/year for $2,000,000 liability and $200,000 worth of rental equipment. That works fine for small films and music videos.

Some film equipment rental houses have their own insurance riders that they can extend to the renter for the period of the rental for an extra fee, but you won't find this available at places like Panavision.
__________________
Tim Dashwood
Tim Dashwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2009, 07:24 PM   #11
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 24
Thanks guys for the info. I'll check with Birns & Sawyer see what I can do. My school just got a new HD 200 and I'm excited to test it out this weekend.
Juan Pablo Ramirez is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > JVC ProHD & MPEG2 Camera Systems > JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:58 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network