JVCHD100 image projected onto cinema screen at DVinfo.net

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Old August 25th, 2005, 05:36 AM   #1
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JVCHD100 image projected onto cinema screen

Hi there,

I am new to this forum but have been following it closely and learnt alot so thanks everyone.

I have read the reports concerning bad press from Australia and have to say that I have had no problems thus far with the camera. I acknowledge that the lens that comes with the camera is merely adequate but I think it is important to stress that in the hands of a good DOP excellent results can still be obtained for those who do not have the budget for the optional better quality lens.

I took it down to our local film and television school today and borrowed their cinema where I projected through a HD projector onto a big screen. Very impressive results! Sharp picture but it certainly does not have the "super video" look of the Sony (which I also have used and like). My initial impression is that with a bit of commitment to learning this camera, it could be an exciting breakthrough for those interested in making independent drama.

So some good news from Australia on the camera thus far. Doing some more testing tomorrow.

Rob Castiglione
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Old August 25th, 2005, 05:55 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Castiglione
I took it down to our local film and television school today and borrowed their cinema where I projected through a HD projector onto a big screen. Very impressive results! Sharp picture but it certainly does not have the "super video" look of the Sony (which I also have used and like).
What do you mean? The sony looked better or the sony had more of a video look (since it's interlaced) and you prefer straight video rather than progressive?
I'm also thinking the sony you mention is the HDV?
Thanks for sharing your experience.
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Old August 25th, 2005, 08:21 AM   #3
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image projected onto cinema screen

Certainly no intention of dissing the Sony HDV cam which I have also used for documentary work. The doco company I work for uses it to great effect for underwater work.

I mean that the Sony had more of a video look.

I bought the JVC specifically because of the progressive scan to do drama work.

Rob Castiglione
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Old August 25th, 2005, 11:39 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Castiglione
I bought the JVC specifically because of the progressive scan to do drama work.
Hi Rob,
So when looked on the big screen: Did you feed the HD uncompressed component signal (live camera) or a component pre-recorded from the tape?

Also some more Q:
Did you project at native 1280x720 @ 24P?
Did you feel the film-like view compared with the Sony's?
If feed from HDV tape: Were HDV's compression artifacts noticeable on the big screen or was it smooth & clean video?

Thx!
Luis
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Old August 26th, 2005, 05:06 AM   #5
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Hi there Luis. The answers to your questions:

1. No it was not (alas) uncompressed HD component signal live. If a viable way of doing this in the field (i.e not massively expensive) emerges it will be great. It was the compressed HDV signal from a pre - recorded tape.

2. I recorded at 25 P ProHDV.

3. Yes, it produced what can reasonably be described as a "film like" image. To be specific - a combination of control over depth of field (pulling camera back and opening up iris), progressive scan mode and paying attention to basic lighting techniques. The technician commented on its film like characteristics. I have used a number of video cameras including Canon XL1s, Panasonic, Sony 150 and 170 and SX and Betacam and it did not look like interlaced video. I have not used the Sony HDV film emulation.

4. I did not see a single compression artificat or imperfection attributable to the codec. It was smooth and clean on the screen. Very good definition and detail and the colours were quite good. I only got the magenta fringing thing once. I shot my last short on a Sony HDWF900 and of course the resolution or colour saturation were of a different order! However, at least I wont have to pay massive on line costs every time I want to make a movie. My overall impression is that it will do quite nicely for drama work. You should also note that the camera is being used in Australia to make a feature as we speak. Go visit the Australian JVC site to check this out. And to answer a question that some of you will have in advance, I understand that they are using the stock standard lens (notwithstanding the magenta chromatic aberration thing that happens sometimes).

I hope that this has been helpful.

Rob
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