Recommendations on the GY-HD series at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > JVC ProHD & MPEG2 Camera Systems > JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems

JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems
GY-HD 100 & 200 series ProHD HDV camcorders & decks.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 12th, 2014, 05:01 PM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Recommendations on the GY-HD series

Years ago I had a GY-HD100, but the firewire port was broken and so I sold it. Now I'm back in the market for one, but I have a few questions. Firstly, let me say I'm on a rather tight budget (I'm trying to pay my way through college and that plus other bills have taken their toll on my available funds), and so my price range is between $750-$900 (maybe $1000 if a really good deal came along). And secondly, I'm just getting back into the market again so I'm not up to date on the latest developments. Anyhow, here are some basic questions that I'm trying to get sorted out

1) I've seen GY-HD100's sell in the above mentioned range on eBay before and occasionally HD110's go this low, but amazon still has them listed as $1,300-$5,000; are they selling for this? Should I be suspicious of any eBay auction less than $1000? Or has the price dropped off and Amazon is just behind the price curve?

2) I've seen the GY-HD111e come up relatively cheaply. I know its the European model, but according to B&H it can record at 720/24p and 720/30p... with this in mind, could it be used in the US if those were the only resolutions I recorded at? Could it read tapes recorded in those same formats/rates on an HD100? Would my computer be able to recognize it when I connected via firewire? Am I crazy, would this never work and should I know better than to even ask? Should I just banish the thought of getting a 111e for use in the USA out of my mind?

3) Does anyone even still use the HD100 or HD110, do they hold their own in the modern world of 1080p? I can't find a recent comparison to other camcorders on the market anywhere. The most recent one I've seen was from 2011. Last word I saw said these were still serious contenders for low budget film makers.

These are a few of the questions which have been plaguing my mind of late. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Sam
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 13th, 2014, 09:50 PM   #2
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

Okay, here's another question. From what I've read on here and elsewhere. The HD-series have 1/3" lens mounts, and getting adapters can be problematic.

With that in mind, does anyone know if one of these would work on an HD100 or HD200? Am I missing something critical? Is the 1/3" mount the key factor in determining if the lens will work or not?

Fujinon YV10X5A SA2 1 3'' 5 50mm F1 8 T360 CS Mount | eBay
Fujinon TF8DA 8B 1 3 inch CCD 8mm F 2 2 C Mount Lens for 3 CCD Video Camera | eBay
Fujinon T16X5 5 Da R11 1 1 4 5 5 88mm 1 3" C Mount TV Zoom Lens 16x for 3CCD | eBay

(Just a disclaimer, I have no stake in any of the eBay auctions listed above, I am just considering buying one of the lenses to use with a camera body which I would [possibly] buy separately.
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 14th, 2014, 12:15 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Gloucs, UK
Posts: 201
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

The cameras you're thinking of are very out of date, if you could find a good condition, low hours one with suitable working batteries, it's probably out of your price range, the ones I've seen on eBay (both US and UK) that fit your price range are usually well worn out and very often have a broken firewire out socket (broken viewfinders are also common) - unless you plan to use a BR-HD50 deck you'll need one with a working FW socket. The lenses you refer to are CCTV lenses, unsuitable for that camera.

My suggestion would be to look for a used JVC HM100, doesn't look as professional as a shoulder mount but will turn out very good HD pictures at 1920x1080 or 1280x720 in either .mov or .mp4 format. The main advantage is shooting onto SD card so no heads to wear, no FW out to blow, just pop the card out and into your choice of computer / edit software. Used prices on the HM100 are within your budget range, they go for around 600/700 UKP on eBay UK.

It might look small compared to an HD100/110 but I've used one professionally and the pictures are stunning.
__________________
http://www.foxvideo.co.uk
Dave Farrants is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 14th, 2014, 01:33 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

I agree with Dave. My HM100 totally outshines the HD100/110 and even the 200/250 as far as picture quality goes. Plus it matches up with my HM700 almost perfectly.

AAMOF I'm looking to sell my HM100 but with the extras I have including 3 batteries (1 of which is a Wasabi brand but has more MaH than the real JVCs and outlasts them), a charger, a remote, a standard mic and I had the typical loose LCD fixed on my own dime, the audio block handle and only 278 hours. I've seen similar kits on EBay for well in excess of $1000.00 and am looking for something in the range of $1300 for mine. I'm going to list it when I return from a trip I'm leaving on Friday, back on the 26th so I'll probably list it and some other stuff shortly after that.
Barebones cameras maybe with a battery or 2 around $1000.00 but in any case you are far better off image wise with the HM100 than the HD100/110.
__________________
What do I know? I'm just a video-O-grafer.
Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2014, 12:06 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 954
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

Selecting a camera isn't necessarily easy. First off, an editorial comment: there really needs to be a section just for "What New Camera to Get?"

Moving on. Part of trying to pick a camera is to consider the holistic system: Computer for processing, applications, video subject matter, budget, and future desires.

Computer:
Everybody has a computer but maybe not the one needed to run the applications, or maybe not the most appropriate and therefore needs to be upgraded. More cost. Monitor and reference speakers - they can easily cost more than the computer. Backup and storage media, UPS system, etc. Resale value? The technology keeps changing so the resale value declines, sometimes rapidly.

Applications:
Video editing applications cost money: iMovie not so much, FCPX at $300 a bit more, and then there are other applications, and add-ons/plug-ins, like file conversion applications for grain removal, color grading, Apple's Motion 5 ($50), etc. Reference books probably fit here too. The two books I have for Motion cost more than the application did.

Video subject matter:
For some things a rolling shutter is not suitable, good low light capability may be needed, form factor for usability (lens rings, switch settings vs menu drill-down settings, etc.), built-in filters, media type. Then there are accessories such as tripods, lights, Glide Cam, audio gear (Audio, according to one big-name producer, is 2/3rds of good video!), B-cam(s) (need to coordinate with main camera), reflectors, stands, and the list can go on. The wedding folks seem to gravitate to DSLRs, sports people tend to like slow-motion capability, and the market for your creations may have certain requirements.

Budget:
I'd proffer that everybody has a budget, from the kid just stating out (I've got a 13 year old using an iPhone) to the big studio, so that is a factor. The holistic system needs to consider the cumulative costs of all the items. Some may be needed now and some may be bought over time.

Future needs:
Looking ahead, the camera bought today may become the B-cam of tomorrow so buying into a system may be a consideration due to spare batteries or image type, but this can also be a gamble as things change.

And then with just about everything in life, there is compromise. This can be the really hard part.

For what it's worth, for myself, I was looking for "the" camera when I got the one I have that was a place holder. And ditto the B-cam I have, so now both are place-holders while I'm still trying to figure out which one to get (I actually need a B-cam too so we're talking a system). Another "for what it's worth …. and that's been a couple years now!

At the rate I'm going, the 13 year old mentioned above may wind up with my "old" camera gear!

I mention all this because you might want to under-spend rather than over-spend on the camera.

Last edited by John Nantz; May 15th, 2014 at 12:07 PM. Reason: changed "of" to "on" (last sentence)
John Nantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2014, 08:05 PM   #6
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

thanks for the advice, I'll certainly look into HM100. I liked the amount of manual control and tweaking I could do in my old HD100, but if the quality of the picture really has become outdated it may be time to look into something else. One of the primary draws to the GY-HD line was the ability to use interchangeable lenses. Right now they're out of my price range, but in another few years if they continue to drop, they'll be within my budget. As others have said, a camera doesn't automatically make a film good. A dull or ill-shot story will never become exciting and interesting by merely shooting on a different device. I have a cannon t3i, and the more I consider it, the more I think it may suit my needs, but I still need to find a good guide to how to get around the rolling shutter issue.

Also, thanks Nantz for such a well thought out summery. And thanks all for your input.
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2014, 01:59 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 954
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

From what I've deduced in your posts you are very serious about your video interests. Warning: That can be expensive!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samuel Wich View Post
I liked the amount of manual control and tweaking I could do in my old HD100
Also, at least in western society, to lust is not illegal. So if you go the route of keeping and using your existing camera while continuing to hunt for it's replacement, that's not so bad.

As for the rolling shutter, just be careful with the kind of motion that gets shot. Maybe the t3i is the low-light interchangeable lens camera and the next one (perhaps an older model) has the camcorder controls that are helpful for shooting video, so there are two cameras in the system. the camcorder could be used for wide shots and the t3i for close in shots.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samuel Wich View Post
As others have said, a camera doesn't automatically make a film good. A dull or ill-shot story will never become exciting and interesting by merely shooting on a different device.
One thing I read recently was that the storyline was 85% of a good movie, the opening seconds or minute was also very important, and the casting was a huge percentage. Frankly, until I read this I never gave casting a thought but that has all changed.

So there are the numbers: 85% storyline, 2/3rds of the remaining 15% is audio. Even if there is some bias in the numbers, and authors strive to make a point, these are still important factors in what makes a good watchable movie or video. I look at the still shot as being a thought while the video tells a story.

If the t3i is retained then one thought is to start building a kit around it. Of course, financially, that will delay it's replacement because of depleting resources, but careful acquisition isn't a waste and can be used with the next camera.

As a suggestion a preamp like, say, a JuicedLink pre
or maybe a recorder, and a/some mic(s). Mics hold their value but beware of counterfeits when buying used. The mic is like an artist's paint brush - I've got six of them and still looking!

For camera support, I've got two tripods, one with a video head and one without, but I'm finding that I'm shooting a lot using a monopod then doing stabilization in post with FCPX, but this depends a lot on what is being shot. Each type has it's advantages. The tripod is the best but that monopod sure is handy.

While you're lusting for that next cam (if you go the route of keeping and using the t3i), the quality of the ones on the used market keep improving so that's not a bad thing.
John Nantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2014, 09:22 PM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta/USA
Posts: 2,507
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

Samuel,

There is no universal answer to your question, because you have not specified perhaps the most important aspect: what would you like to use the HD for? A lot depends on your answer.

Just a little while ago I searched for a camera for my specific needs and found that a good old HD100 was just what I needed. So I purchased one, together with a FireStore CF card recorder to eliminate tape, and I'm a very happy owner of a tool that delivers the perfect result for my needs.

Yes, the HD100 is now old, yes, it's only 1280x720. But it shoots a beautiful progressive image, and in the skilled hands of a professional it is still a decent tool. A 1920x1080 camera may produce a better picture... or may not... it all depends who's behind the viewfinder.

(No, I don't use the HD100 for legal video).
__________________
Ervin Farkas, CDVS
Certified Legal Videographer
Ervin Farkas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 23rd, 2014, 11:23 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: LOWESTOFT - UK
Posts: 2,124
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

I've been a JVC user for a long time - and still have a couple of 111's - history wise, because of stupid tax reasons many UK cameras are the world wide variant, but often with no record facility from a video input - something many US versions, for example could do. Ours usually adds UK frame rates (25 and 50) to the 30/60 ones built in - so using a UK camera in the US is OK. At worst you'll need to source a new power supply if it's not 110-240V, but just 220-240, as a few were.
Paul R Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 24th, 2014, 08:58 AM   #10
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

@ Ervin Farkas, I didn't realize I hadn't posted what I intended to do with the camera, but you're dead right that that's one of the most important questions. First of all, I currently do not do film making for a living, more of a side hobby. I hoped to use the camera for short and feature length films, and possibly some documentary work. I prefer editing 720p rather than 1080p because its easier on my computer, especially when one begins layering multiple layers for green screen work, so lack of 1080p wasn't a huge drawback for me.

@ Paul R Johnson, thanks for the information. Looking at the camera I couldn't see why an HD111e wouldn't work in the US, but I wanted to be sure there wasn't a reason beyond possibly power supply discrepancies between regions.
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30th, 2014, 05:55 PM   #11
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

I have the chance to buy a HD110 in good working order with a couple spare batteries and a DTE for $675, this is well within my price range and cheaper than a GY-HM100 (which I'm still not sold on). I'm seriously considering getting this, it seems like a good deal and I loved my old HD100, so I'm already predisposed to the line of camcorders. I'm not sure what I'll do, but I'll post my decision here when its final. Thanks to all who have provided feedback, it really has been helpful.
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1st, 2014, 06:41 PM   #12
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Murfreesboro USA
Posts: 11
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

well, for better or for worse I decided to go for it. There have been many times when I have over analyzed, over-thought and ultimately missed out on a lot of good deals which I later regretted.

So with that said, hopefully you all will be seeing content from me in the near future.

One question though, do the GY-HD100 scene files work in the HD110? I know that the HD100 scene files don't work properly with the HD200.
Samuel Wich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1st, 2014, 10:14 PM   #13
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Perth, Western Australia.
Posts: 568
Re: Recommendations on the GY-HD series

Hi Samuel

I have been too busy with Uni to get into the forum for a while, but I did read this thread. I bought a GY-HD111E only about a year ago and have loved it. I love the real lens with mechanical connections to focus, zoom and aperture. I love the look of the picture and yes I am using HD100 scene files.

I cannot think why you would be disappointed with your choice. It also takes a lot less computing power on the 720p. I have also shot this multi cam with some Canon HF-200's and you can get a pretty good match with the picture adjustments in the Canon to Paolo's True Colour 3 scene file which is around on the forum, too.

Enjoy!
__________________
Cheers
Tim
Tim Lewis is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > JVC ProHD & MPEG2 Camera Systems > JVC GY-HD Series Camera Systems

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:38 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network