Anybody got Steve's book yet? at DVinfo.net

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Old January 9th, 2006, 09:05 PM   #1
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Anybody got Steve's book yet?

Anybody bought Steve's HD100 book and can recommend? I wonder if it's basic video production stuff or if it goes really deep in HDV and HD production for filmmaking and if it's a real guide to the HD100 going in depth the way Goodman Guide to the Varicam does for the Panasonic. I have been tempted in buying it, but I havenít heard any reviews yet, good or bad.
If itís a really in depth book on the HD100 and geared towards cinematography, itís worth it for me, otherwise I have already a whole bunch of books on video and film production. If anybody has bought it, it would be interesting to hear a review.
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Old January 9th, 2006, 09:33 PM   #2
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I purchased Steve's book and would certainly recommend it. I must admit, before I purchased his book, we had similar concerns, however, it was well worth the money. My HD100 arrived a week after I purchased the book and it certainly help me "jump start" my knowledgebase and capability of the camera and HD in general. That was 3 weeks ago, without the book I would still be on week 1. I don't think you can go wrong, especially at his price point.
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Old January 9th, 2006, 09:45 PM   #3
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I'm reading it now myself and it also is helping me out. I do think there should have been more on shooting with intentiosn to go to film etc.
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Old January 9th, 2006, 10:05 PM   #4
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I bought it on day one, but wouldn't recommend it to a beginner looking for a "layman's term" alternative to the instruction manual.

Steve's book is very in-depth in the technology chapters, so if you are interested in the nitty gritty of MPEG and HDV technology, then this book is for you.
The first 100 pages (4 chapters) contain everything you ever wanted to know about video codecs, Mpeg compression, I, B & P frames, HDV, and CCDs.
Chapter 5 is the "Introduction to the HD100" and expands a tiny bit on what you've already read in the instruction manual.
Chapter 6 is the "Shooting Guide," Ch7 is "Image Control Options," Ch8 is "Setup and Connections," Ch9 is "HDV Editing Workflows," Ch10 is "Working with 24P."

You won't find that any of these chapters are really geared toward lighting techniques, but they do describe a little bit about how the gamma curves and matrix affect the camera's response. There is also a bit about the lens, depth of field and achieving a film look in post.

Also, I should mention that the "Working with 24P" section doesn't really have any sort of key that will help you unlock the secret of post-production with 720P24 footage. Steve includes some concise descriptions of various workflows on PC and Mac, but nothing new that you can't find right here on dvinfo.

There are then a bunch of appendixes on HD formats, single chip CCD, audio connections, a HD10 shooting guide and an appendix on HD distribution.

For the price, the book represents a good value for anyone interested in current HDV technology, but it can't really be compared to Robert Goodman's guides. Steve Mullen, PhD is a technology writer & professor, and not a shooter, so the perspective is very different.
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Old January 9th, 2006, 11:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood
wouldn't recommend it to a beginner looking for a "layman's term" alternative to the instruction manual.
Beginners shouldn't be buying such a professional camera as this either. *smile*

IMO

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Old January 10th, 2006, 03:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood
For the price, the book represents a good value for anyone interested in current HDV technology, but it can't really be compared to Robert Goodman's guides. Steve Mullen, PhD is a technology writer & professor, and not a shooter, so the perspective is very different.
I was mainly interested in the shooting guide part. I thought it would be a Godman's for the HD100. It seems it's very basic by what everybody is saying. The post and other things as you said can be learned around here. Besides it will change as other applications incorporate HDV 720 24p and other codecs are developed. The camera part is what I was interested.
About the price, it depends what you compare it with. It's cheaper than the Goodman's guide, but then again it's for a cheaper camera and not as good as you point. But it's more expensive than Digital Moviemaking by Scott Billups, Film Lighting by Kris Malkiewicz and most of the other great book on the subject, and it's a pdf book, which means you have to pay for printing yourself.
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Old January 10th, 2006, 04:58 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood
Also, I should mention that the "Working with 24P" section doesn't really have any sort of key that will help you unlock the secret of post-production with 720P24 footage. Steve includes some concise descriptions of various workflows on PC and Mac, but nothing new that you can't find right here on dvinfo.
You are quite correct -- you can find this info here and other places. But, as we saw a few weeks ago when we tried to help someone -- not everyone can follow a series of "postings" and get results.

The real issue, however, is that with the exception of Cineform, all of our current solutions are work-arounds while we wait for Adobe, Apple, and Avid to support 24p. When they do, editing 24p HDV will be as easy as working with 24p DV from the DVX100. Yes, there will need to be an introduction to the topic, but it should become much easier.

It's MacWorld time so perhaps we'll hear something today.
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Old January 10th, 2006, 10:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood
I bought it on day one, but wouldn't recommend it to a beginner looking for a "layman's term" alternative to the instruction manual..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shannon Rawls
Beginners shouldn't be buying such a professional camera as this either. *smile* .
Well, guys, I am a beginner and bought both the HD-100 and Steve's book in the same week, and it all made good sense to me! For other new shooters out there, don’t be intimidated - read the book and go shoot some footage, the end results are the best way to learn. The camera, and the book are great!
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Old January 11th, 2006, 12:09 AM   #9
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Steve, are you doing updates for the book, and if so, will prior buyers get free upgrades?

Thanks =)
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Old January 11th, 2006, 03:05 AM   #10
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writing a book

Hi Guys,

Don't want to sound like a smart arse but I just wanted to put in my opinoin. Writing a book particularly a factual/technical book is about research and collating that research into some form of intelligable format that somehow informs your reader. Sure, you could probably find all the information and more on this site and others like it on the internet but (and I hope Steve would agree with me here) when you buy Steve's book, for example, what you are basically paying for is someones expertise in not only research and collating information but putting that information into some sort of meaningful order. I have two other really good books one on dv and one on hdv; so why did I buy Steves book? because it fills in a lot of blank spaces for me. In which case, I would say to those cosidering purchase, if you want a book that means you never need to buy another book on the subject again don't buy Steve Mullen's book. However I'm not sure the book you are looking for exists. Alternativly, if you want a book that will increase your knowledge on the subject to a greater or lesser extent no matter who you are, then in my opinion Steve's book is a damn site better than many I've seen.

All the best guys Greg C.

P.S. I like my comfort zone (I think everyone does) but I know that to push myself out of it now and again is always rewarding
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Old January 11th, 2006, 04:49 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Duke
Steve, are you doing updates for the book, and if so, will prior buyers get free upgrades?

Thanks =)
I can't find any sign Apple released anything on 24p HDV at MacWorld and I suspect Avid will not be releasing anything until next summer.

So it looks like Premiere with AspectHD is the only "commercial" 24p HDV solution that will appear in the next 6 months.

Since the book already covers AspectHD and all the 24p "work arounds" it looks like it will remain viable for another half year.

By the way -- all the 30p NLE solutions are covered in-depth as well.

By next summer I expect a new HDV camcorder from both the Pro and Consumer divisions. The Pro camcorder will probably offer 1080i and perhaps 720p60. The Consumer camcorder will likely record on hard-disk and could even be AVC-based.

These are huge changes, so I'm likely to do a whole new book. I'll know more by NAB 2006.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 01:58 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Corke
Hi Guys,

Don't want to sound like a smart arse but I just wanted to put in my opinoin. Writing a book particularly a factual/technical book is about research and collating that research into some form of intelligable format that somehow informs your reader. Sure, you could probably find all the information and more on this site and others like it on the internet but (and I hope Steve would agree with me here) when you buy Steve's book, for example, what you are basically paying for is someones expertise in not only research and collating information but putting that information into some sort of meaningful order. I have two other really good books one on dv and one on hdv; so why did I buy Steves book? because it fills in a lot of blank spaces for me. In which case, I would say to those cosidering purchase, if you want a book that means you never need to buy another book on the subject again don't buy Steve Mullen's book. However I'm not sure the book you are looking for exists. Alternativly, if you want a book that will increase your knowledge on the subject to a greater or lesser extent no matter who you are, then in my opinion Steve's book is a damn site better than many I've seen.

All the best guys Greg C.

P.S. I like my comfort zone (I think everyone does) but I know that to push myself out of it now and again is always rewarding
Greg I see your point. I do think Steve's book is probably great for HDV knowledge in general. I was just hoping it would be more of a shooting guide for the HD100, like the Goodman books I already mentioned.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 02:06 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Mullen
By next summer I expect a new HDV camcorder from both the Pro and Consumer divisions. The Pro camcorder will probably offer 1080i and perhaps 720p60. The Consumer camcorder will likely record on hard-disk and could even be AVC-based
Steve, is the Pro version you're talking about the HD7000? I'm just not sure if when you say a new Pro and a New consumer you mean the HD7000 and a HD100 replacement (in which case, the HD100 is not consumer) or if you mean the HD7000 and another camera bellow the HD100 in the consumer level like a HD1 size camera. Or if you maybe know something we don't and mean a HD100 replacement and a consumer camera HD1 sized.
In any case a JVC high employee has posted that the HD100 will see no replacement in the near future and itís a mature product. 2006 seems pretty near future for me.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 03:09 PM   #14
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Hi Michael, no offense I hope.

Hi Michael,

Hope what I said wasn't out of line. I've got the upmost respect for everyone here. I Hate words they sound so blunt sometimes, if you get my drift.

Regards Greg.
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Old January 11th, 2006, 03:13 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Maier
...a JVC high employee has posted that the HD100 will see no replacement in the near future and it’s a mature product. 2006 seems pretty near future for me.
Well, we'll have to wait and see. They have to say that because otherwise people might decide to wait for the 'updated' version. It is hard to believe that they would release a brand new product and consider it mature. On the other hand, the upgrade might come in 2-3 years, which would keep early adopters happy and give JVC enough time to make significant changes.
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