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Old June 21st, 2006, 05:16 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Jaschob
"For extra assurance, I would also recommend the use of a firewire port isolator."


Tim,
Are you saying this is a fix or should be used as well as tuning off my computer and camera to hook up the FW cable?

Thanks,
Jon
Always turn them off, with or without the isolator.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 12:36 PM   #32
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Will do, thanks.
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Old June 28th, 2006, 03:03 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin
Always turn them off, with or without the isolator.
Don't you think it's a bit unpractical to turn the computer off, re-boot and all that, re-load the program, etc. every time you need to download something?

The good thing of firewire connectors is just the opposite: than you can plug or unplug any external unit without booting your your computer, as on other devices. Why lose that?

Wrong advice I think.

If there's a problem that JVC can't solve, let's go about the problem in a different way.

The cable isolator seems like a good approach. It probably has input transformers blocking any DC that might get through and maybe causing the "frying" problems. Transformers are a good thing in digital lines if they are good quality.

This cable seems reasonably priced too:

http://www.abelcine.com/store/produc...cat=252&page=1

In any case, plugging and unplugging these connectors on the camera end, which are usually the small 1394 type, is a certain death in the long run. Deal with them with love and care.

My advice is: when you are editing something, leave the camera cable plugged-in all the time. In fact leave that cable plugged in on your camera as long as you can. Only unplug it when you are going to shoot.

The ideal thing would be to use a separate HDV player, but they are not cheap.
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Old June 28th, 2006, 03:34 AM   #34
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There's some good advice here on people dealing with firewire on Macs:

http://www.macintouch.com/readerrepo...topic2188.html

Good for PC owners like me too.

Discharging the cable before connecting to the PC end sounds like a good advice, even if a bit unpractical.

The port isolator seems like the better option, particularly because your access to the terminal would be easier, as you can keep it up-front.

Now that I remember, my Canopus ADVC100 interface, that I use to convert analog video to firewire, has small and large 1394 sockets. It's quite likely it has transformers inside. I think I will start using those sockets instead of the ones on the back of my PC.
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Old June 28th, 2006, 07:29 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlos E. Martinez
Don't you think it's a bit unpractical to turn the computer off, re-boot and all that, re-load the program, etc. every time you need to download something?

The good thing of firewire connectors is just the opposite: than you can plug or unplug any external unit without booting your your computer, as on other devices. Why lose that?

Wrong advice I think.

If there's a problem that JVC can't solve, let's go about the problem in a different way.

The cable isolator seems like a good approach. It probably has input transformers blocking any DC that might get through and maybe causing the "frying" problems. Transformers are a good thing in digital lines if they are good quality.

This cable seems reasonably priced too:

http://www.abelcine.com/store/produc...cat=252&page=1

In any case, plugging and unplugging these connectors on the camera end, which are usually the small 1394 type, is a certain death in the long run. Deal with them with love and care.

My advice is: when you are editing something, leave the camera cable plugged-in all the time. In fact leave that cable plugged in on your camera as long as you can. Only unplug it when you are going to shoot.

The ideal thing would be to use a separate HDV player, but they are not cheap.
That's the flaw with firewire, it could fry the componints. Isolators do not solve anything, but maybe reducing the risk a little, and obviously hot swapping firewire may cause a problem, and it has, for most people. My advise was better safe then sorry. What is the big deal in powering off before you plug in and un-plug firewire hardware? Obviously you leave cables pluged in while working with the devices, so what is your advise exactly?
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Old June 28th, 2006, 08:32 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin
That's the flaw with firewire, it could fry the componints. Isolators do not solve anything, but maybe reducing the risk a little, and obviously hot swapping firewire may cause a problem, and it has, for most people. My advise was better safe then sorry. What is the big deal in powering off before you plug in and un-plug firewire hardware? Obviously you leave cables pluged in while working with the devices, so what is your advise exactly?
Really Its a safe bet and a good one at that.
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Old July 1st, 2006, 01:45 PM   #37
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Just because firewire is "supposed to be" hot-swappable doesn't mean you should do it. I've seen firewire drives fried, as well as the cards on computers when people plug or unplug them without shutting down first. It's just a natural precaution to do so.
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Old July 29th, 2006, 06:49 AM   #38
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problem connecting my JVC GY HD100UA and my powerbook G4

I am using a firewire cable (standard) but FCP does not recognize the external device (my JVC camcorder). I have turned everything off, connected the two devices, then turned the camera on and then turned the powerbook on. Still no luck.
Any suggestion?
Cecilia
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Old July 29th, 2006, 07:24 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cecilia Galiena
I am using a firewire cable (standard) but FCP does not recognize the external device (my JVC camcorder). I have turned everything off, connected the two devices, then turned the camera on and then turned the powerbook on. Still no luck.
Any suggestion?
Cecilia
The camera needs to be in VTR mode, the switch needs to be in HDV, and the frame rate needs to be 720P30. FCP needs to be version 5 or higher and you need to set your capture preset to HDV 720P30 (use the easy setup option.)
Currently FCP 5.0 - 5.1.1 only supports 720P30 from the HD100. A forthcoming update from Apple will add capture support for 720P24.
Search the forum for 720P24 alternatives like HDVxDV, LumiereHD, DVHSCap, MPEG Streamclip, or the "iMovie/AIC method"
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Old September 7th, 2006, 09:39 AM   #40
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I blew my previous cam's firewire port (4 pin) as well as the PC's firewire port - at the same time...I either connected whilst both were on (hot swapping - very likely...if it's ok for USB's I thought...) or the thunder storm occuring at the time threw them both out. Had to get a cheap mini dv cam to use purely as a DV out machine (still using the blown cam for recording).

Any idea where I can pick up a port isolator? Can't seem to find referance to these in the UK??
Thanks.
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Old September 27th, 2006, 03:38 PM   #41
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There are a couple questions brought up in this thread that echo some of my own. But for some of them I didn't see any definite answers. (Maybe there aren't any or I simply missed them!) Perhaps someone can help me out with a few.

1. Just like someone else pointed out, my 6-pin Firewire cords are too thick for the ferrite core protectors that come with the camera. Well, the cables fit if you run them through once, but if you loop the cable through the protector thingie twice as the manual says you should, then the protector is too narrow. What is one to do?

2. Someone asked if powering down before removing Firewire cords means turning off the computer as well as the camera. I have no problem making sure the camera is off, but rebooting the computer every time I remove the Firewire plug seems a bit much. Does JVC really mean that we should reboot every time we remove the plug? Even if we only pull the plug out of the camera but not from the computer?

3. How "good" of a Firewire cord do I need? The camera didn't come with one so right now I'm using one that I had sitting in a box somewhere. I don't remember where it came from so I don't know its specs (except that it seems to be 6-pin and it's about 4 feet long). I want to use the proper sort of cord, but then again, I don't want to spend a ridiculous amount of money for it either.

Thanks.
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Old September 27th, 2006, 04:03 PM   #42
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I purchased a gold plated, really well made lead from Maplins in the UK for about 10. Can't see me requiring anything better than that. I have ordered a Firewire isolator box though - having blown both an older camera and the PC port (at the same time) I'm not taking any more chances. Purchased this for around 50 - money well spent considering what damage these fragile, temperemental little beasts...I mean firewire ports can be.

Not sure about rebooting the PC (which is indeed ridiculous)...I suppose as long as you connect correctly you'll be ok....but there's then the time you forget yourself and....fizzle...

Does anybody know if the reboot applies when using the aforementioned firewire isolator box (I'k getting a Kramer)?
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Old September 27th, 2006, 08:40 PM   #43
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Bottom line is I now follow the protocol in the manual since I blew my FW port up on the camera. I don't think all FW ports on all cameras are so sensitive to spike damage though. I've had a PD100 for about 5 years and connected and disconnected it from computers and tape decks hundreds of times while both units were on and it never blew - maybe that's just luck, maybe it's to do with the 4 pin as opposed to 6pin port - I don't know. I was quite surprised to hear that the blowing up of FW ports was a common occurrence on all brands of cameras (never happened to anyone I knew before).
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Old September 27th, 2006, 11:08 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mitchell
Bottom line is I now follow the protocol in the manual since I blew my FW port up on the camera. I don't think all FW ports on all cameras are so sensitive to spike damage though. I've had a PD100 for about 5 years and connected and disconnected it from computers and tape decks hundreds of times while both units were on and it never blew - maybe that's just luck, maybe it's to do with the 4 pin as opposed to 6pin port - I don't know. I was quite surprised to hear that the blowing up of FW ports was a common occurrence on all brands of cameras (never happened to anyone I knew before).

John,

It absolutly does have something to do with 4 pin vs 6 pin. The 6 pin FW connectors and cables carry DC power from the computer to the other end of the cable. It's this power that can cause problems when hot-plugged or un-plugged, or the end of the cable is started into the device backwards, even if not fully seated.

Regards, Carl
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Old September 27th, 2006, 11:31 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Hicks
John,

It absolutly does have something to do with 4 pin vs 6 pin. The 6 pin FW connectors and cables carry DC power from the computer to the other end of the cable. It's this power that can cause problems when hot-plugged or un-plugged, or the end of the cable is started into the device backwards, even if not fully seated.

Regards, Carl
With this in mind, is it possible to by a 4-wire cable with 6-pin connector?

Or, if I use a cable with a 4-pin connector and a 4-pin to 6-pin adapter, will I be safe... that is, in either of the above cases, I won't be carrying the two power wires to the camera/deck?

Thanks!
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