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Old February 22nd, 2007, 03:50 AM   #1
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The New Movie "300" and HD100

Has anyone seen the trailor for the new movie "300" and what look is it they use? Is it possible to get it on the HD100? Anyone has some ideas. Love the way it looks. Maybe its all done in post.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 03:55 AM   #2
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Much of "300" is blue screen work. That's how they get those crazy skylines and hyper reality atmosphere.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 04:32 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Luce
Much of "300" is blue screen work. That's how they get those crazy skylines and hyper reality atmosphere.
That's what I figured. So there is really no way to get soem of those colors in the HD100?
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 11:01 AM   #4
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I'm sure those shots were color-timed (correction in post) like you wouldn't believe. In addition, they shot on film, which has much wider latitude, and probably used different developing processes, like a bleach process.

Check out the on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/300_(film)
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 11:30 AM   #5
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The look of the film was given to it by a color balance process called "The Crush." There is a little info about it here on the bottom of page 4 in this "Production Notes" pdf:
http://300themovie.warnerbros.com/me...prod_notes.pdf

There is more information about how the film was shot and the kind of processing involved in the imdb.com trivia about the film:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0416449/trivia

I would think that by using a cinegamma gamma curve and capturing the fullest range of colors possible with the HD100/110/200/250 (something like Paolo's True Color V3?), then going to uncompressed in the editor and using the right processing tools you could get a similar look to "The Crush." If you were on a stage, you could take the uncompressed right off the camera. If you're final output was HiDef TV from a DVD I think a similar look is possible.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 01:33 PM   #6
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I'm pretty sure with enough postwork you could get that look from footage captured from a HD100 series camera.

What you WOULD have to do though, is plan your shots meticulously, because without the latitude of film you would need to shoot close enough to the end colours you want to achieve the look you need.

To get close to the 300 look you would probably need a different scene file for almost every shot, and a VERY good DOP, and a VERY good green screen set up, and a VERY good colourist on high end gear.

The thing is, apart from the different scen file for almost shot, 300 undoubtedly needed all of the above anyway. And even then they may have used different stocks for different shots, which is a similiar thing.

I have produced a short shot on DV with the DSR300 series cameras and then went through and done a colour grade and have had uninformed people assuming we shot in HiDef/16mm because they didn't expect DV to look like that.

One of the major things about DV projects is not that DV has a certain look, rather that most DV projects are done on the cheap and the entire workflow isn't followed through to a proper professional colour grade and they are not shot with a colour grade in mind.

The same will undoubtedly be true of HDV projects from people out of film schools etc, they will have a branded 'look' to them because people just shoot on the format and will less often than not do a full colour grade in post, and then complain about the look of HDV.

With film this isn't as often an issue, because you HAVE to grade film to a certain look, it's part and parcel of the processing cost (even if you don't do a DI just regular colourtiming will be part of your decision making in post) and once you got to the expense of shooting on film you want your footage to look right when it comes back from the lab.
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