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Old June 10th, 2007, 04:40 PM   #1
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Going to Africa with HD100U, 50hz question

Greetings,

The company I work for has been hired to shoot a fundrasing video in Swaziland and Lesotho. Lesotho uses a 220v 50hz electical system and Swaziland uses a 230v 50hz system. I have a JVC HD100U that I bought and use in the USA that we were planning on using to shoot down there. I have the Anton Bauer battery package that I use to power the camera with 3 dionic 90 lithium-ion batteries.
My question: Can I use the camera down there and can I use the current AB batteries and charger with some sort of adaptor to charge/power the camera.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
John
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Old June 10th, 2007, 05:35 PM   #2
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EDIT: Here are the recommended plug adapters for Swaziland and Lesotho:
http://www.traveloasis.com/grounadwa2wa1.html

My AB charger says the input can be
90-250v
50-60Hz
80 watts.

Yours is probably the same. It is written on the side. If so, should not be a problem.

I don't know how stable the current is, that is if you would experience high spikes and require some kind of regulator.

I suggest you call AB and ask their tech support. However, I believe the AB units are used around the world without problem.

Here is a link to plug adapter kits. Look down the page for one for Africa, with no less than 7 adapters:
http://traveloasis.com/inadkit.html

Here is a link that lists voltages for most countries:
http://ezinearticles.com/?Electrical...ters&id=304748

Bottom line is that the local power in most places in the world can be plugged directly into an Anton Bauer charger. However, you must adapt the end of the cord, the plug, to fit into the outlets of the countries you are going to. These adapters are readily available at your local electronics store in the U.S. for standard destinations. For more exotic adapters, see the link above as a starting place.

You will need a plug adapter, to change the U.S. prongs to the type used to plug-in in the countries you are going.

Here the support info page for Anton Bauer:
http://www.antonbauer.com/customer_support.htm

Last edited by Jack Walker; June 10th, 2007 at 07:58 PM.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 06:28 PM   #3
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Thank you Jack for the quick response. I love the internet. The charger I have is at the office. I'll it out tomorrow morning to see what power input it can take. The charger I have is the one that came with the HD100 when they had that special with Anton Bauer last year. My plan is to go down there with 3 batteries which, at roughly 6 hours of charge, should give me about 18 hours of battery life.

I didn't think the solution would be as simple as adapting the plug. I figured there would be something more delicate with the electronics of the charger or batteries.

Thanks again,
John
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Old June 10th, 2007, 06:33 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Carrithers View Post
50hz system.
Don't forget to only shoot with shutter-speeds that are multiples of 50 when there are lights -- esp flourescents -- lighting anything you are shooting. Even if only inside a window or in a corder. It will flicker at 10Hz if you use 1/60th.
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Last edited by Steve Mullen; June 11th, 2007 at 04:01 AM.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 06:37 PM   #5
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Thanks Steve. I was wondering about that too.
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Old June 10th, 2007, 06:49 PM   #6
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Are you sure about shutter speed?

The issue for 50Hz is frame rate (25P is the match) as I understand things but I guess that's what you were meaning.

A national grid at 50Hz should be stable enough but an isolated town power supply at 50Hz may be off enough that you might get a sort of slow dull colour temperature phasing effect.

Last edited by Bob Hart; June 10th, 2007 at 06:52 PM. Reason: error
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Old June 10th, 2007, 08:02 PM   #7
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Are you sure about shutter speed?

The issue for 50Hz is frame rate (25P is the match) as I understand things but I guess that's what you were meaning.
I will be in a similar situation in a few months, shooting a documentary in Europe.

The final output is DVD NTSC.

Does everyone shoot 25p or 50i in Europe, even if the the use is only in the U.S.? Then the original footage has to be converted to 60i or 24p or 30p?

What about film cameras? Can they shoot at 24p, 1/48? Or are special cameras used that shoot 25p, 1/50?

Thanks.
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Old June 11th, 2007, 04:00 AM   #8
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Are you sure about shutter speed?
Yes. Been shooting in India since `82 and all over Asia. Simply bump 1/60th to 1/100th.

The frame rate should be 60p since you are from Region 60. Of course, I'm assuming you do not want low temporal rate judder from 24p or 30p in your production.

You do not need, or even want to, shoot anything not Region 60 if that is where you'll be editing.

PS: if one needs to release in both R50 and R60 -- then there is an advantage to 720p24. It can be sped up for PAL and 2-3 pulldown can be added for NTSC. But, since almost all PAL DVD players and TVs will show NTSC -- this is not really a necessary concern.
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Old June 11th, 2007, 08:02 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Jack Walker View Post
I will be in a similar situation in a few months, shooting a documentary in Europe.

The final output is DVD NTSC.

Does everyone shoot 25p or 50i in Europe, even if the the use is only in the U.S.? Then the original footage has to be converted to 60i or 24p or 30p?

What about film cameras? Can they shoot at 24p, 1/48? Or are special cameras used that shoot 25p, 1/50?

Thanks.
In Europe everyone shooting for PAL TV will shoot at 25p or 50i.

For theatrical release film cameras usually are set for 24 fps, however, if they're shooting for TV they'll use 25 fps. It's extremely easy to change the frame rate on modern film cameras, although on the older cameras you might have to change a gear.

You can shoot using NTSC video gear, but it's not common and has to be hired from companies that support it. However, cameras like the F900 have the option of shooting at various progressive and interlace frame rates.

You do have to be careful with flicker under fluorescents when shooting at 30p/60i in Europe unless you use the shutter at say 1/100. However, CRT televisions could cause problems.
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Old June 11th, 2007, 08:55 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Jack Walker View Post
I don't know how stable the current is, that is if you would experience high spikes and require some kind of regulator.
Jack Walker's remark above is the most important info in this thread. Run your camera off the batteries only, of course. This camera, as we know from the 'firewire input' issue, is very power-sensitive. Power fluctuations are a several-times-a-day fact-of-life in nearly all of sub-Saharan Africa (I'm a former ABC News correspondent for that region), so to plug one of these cameras -- or frankly, any camera, directly into the mains in this part of the world is flirting with disaster.

Additionally, if you are shooting long hours in remote areas and may be sleeping where there is no electric power (or, perhaps just no power available on the night when you happen to be there) you need to bring some extra pre-charged AB batteries with you to see-you-through days when you have not had the opportunity to recharge.

All this said, it is also very likely that you will be enormously impressed with the electrical infrastructure everywhere you go, that you will see not a single brown-out, and will curse my name for having caused you to carry heavy extra batteries: Electrical infrastructure is improving rapidly particularly in the three southernmost countries of Africa, where you will be shooting.

In addition, the distances, even to remote areas, are small enough in that area that you may be returning to a luxurious hotel every night, rather than staying in the villages where you will be shooting, in which case the extra batteries may prove to have been an excessive precaution.

If you are carrying lights, expecting to run them off the mains or off a village generator, remember to bring plenty of extra lamps.
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Old June 11th, 2007, 09:57 AM   #11
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I just talked to Anton Bauer support. They confirmed all the things Jack mentioned. The Titan Charger/Power Supply I have will work fine around the world with the plug adapted. Thanks for the input on shutter speeds and frame rates. I'll plan on shooting at 60p at 100th of a second. I believe we will be staying in hotels every night so the battery power I'm planning on going there with should suit us fine.

Thanks again. Much appreciated.
John
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Old June 15th, 2007, 08:33 PM   #12
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Here in OZ we have our older 16mm and 35mm cameras that have no electronic or adjustable shutter angles at a fixed 172.8 degrees, so even in 50hz we can have the camera running at 24fps, it eliminates flicker. Now if Tim can tell us what exactly 172.8 degrees is in Shutter speed, you will be able to run 24pfs in Africa.
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Old June 16th, 2007, 04:29 AM   #13
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...you will be able to run 24pfs in Africa.
Since has an HD250 -- he has no reason to shoot 24p. He can take advantage of the temporal clarity of 720p60 to create a production with impact.
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Old June 16th, 2007, 07:40 AM   #14
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Yes steve he can shoot on any other 60hz frame rate but he is using a HD100, my point is, if someone is able to figure out what 172.8 degrees on any 60hz frame rate, they will be able to shoot 60hz in Africa without any flicker.
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Old June 27th, 2007, 04:57 PM   #15
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Can someone explain me this flicker problem you are mentioning (or maybe a link to somewere where that is explained)?. I am thinking of buying a HD110U to use it in PAL land, so any info regarding the shutter speed/frame rate/light flicker will be very appreciated.
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