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Old July 17th, 2009, 06:17 AM   #31
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What are you going to take pictures of?

Is is possible the less expensive camera will give you better pictures for now.

Are you going to use manual settings or shoot in one of the auto modes.

I suggest you go to a store if possible and see the menus on the cameras, see the size and weight, and see how they operate.

A $400 camera can take outstanding pictures. But if you are planning to shoot stage performances in low light, need a long telephoto lens (for about $3000 or more) and so forth, that is when you need to look at the pro DSLRs.

Just what will you be photographing and in what lighting conditions?

In my opinion, it is best to learn digital photography with a fixed lens camera. The higher end consumer cameras with manual controls can give every bit as good pictures as the pro cameras, and probably better for less experienced users.

But again, the first consideration is what are you going to shoot and under what conditions, and what will be the final use for the pictures... web, 4x6 prints, 8x10 prints, printed brochures, magazines, billboards, or something else.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 07:20 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Jack Walker View Post
What are you going to take pictures of?

Is is possible the less expensive camera will give you better pictures for now.

Are you going to use manual settings or shoot in one of the auto modes.

I suggest you go to a store if possible and see the menus on the cameras, see the size and weight, and see how they operate.

A $400 camera can take outstanding pictures. But if you are planning to shoot stage performances in low light, need a long telephoto lens (for about $3000 or more) and so forth, that is when you need to look at the pro DSLRs.

Just what will you be photographing and in what lighting conditions?

In my opinion, it is best to learn digital photography with a fixed lens camera. The higher end consumer cameras with manual controls can give every bit as good pictures as the pro cameras, and probably better for less experienced users.

But again, the first consideration is what are you going to shoot and under what conditions, and what will be the final use for the pictures... web, 4x6 prints, 8x10 prints, printed brochures, magazines, billboards, or something else.

I want to start my own business, for video & photo. These include videos & photos of Event, Wedding, Portrait, Picnic, Parties and anything like documentary, small films etc. Means purely professional work, maybe initially small scale, but same time do not want any compromise, but if I can save money with good selection of equipments then I will have to consider less expensive models also.

Thanks,
Kaushik
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Old July 17th, 2009, 10:19 AM   #33
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Parmar, as far as stills, first of all decide what system you want- Canon or Nikon. Don't even consider anything else. Nikon tends to be more $$$ and one drawback is pinkish skin tones, so you'll have to do a lot of correcting in photoshop. Just collect glass, don't worry too much about the body. And always buy the top quality, as you will need it.
My though is also as far a s video you will need a lot of help- editing, sound and such. It's not a solo gig and my best advice is to hook up with some small production company.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 11:58 AM   #34
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Sorry, but I strongly disagree with this for being both inaccurate and poorly considered.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 01:43 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Kaushik Parmar View Post
I want to start my own business, for video & photo. These include videos & photos of Event, Wedding, Portrait, Picnic, Parties and anything like documentary, small films etc. Means purely professional work, maybe initially small scale, but same time do not want any compromise, but if I can save money with good selection of equipments then I will have to consider less expensive models also.

Thanks,
Kaushik
How many people are on your staff? Will you be shooting video or stills. If you shoot video, perhaps the stills photographer will have his own equipment.

If you have not been shooting either video or stills yet professionally (or an an amateur), I suggest you start with one, then add the other one.

If you are shooting still photos of weddings, you will also need to consider a flash system. You will also need at least two cameras, in my opinion to shoot still photos at weddings.

If you do not have experience with digital photography, before buying a digital camera, I think it's necessary to rent or borrow a could of different ones and try them out.

There is no point in buying equipment that you will end up never using. Get the basics for your main purpose, for example, shooting video at weddings, then use it and build on it according to your needs and style of shooting. A large percentage of the dvinfo.net Private Classifieds are practically new items, in many cases purchased originally because the way things seemed they would be turned out not.

When it comes to buying digital cameras, buying a less expensive camera is not necessarily buying an inferior camera.

By the way, the Canon 5D MkII with the basic top quality 24-70mm lens will cost about $4000. The combo weighs over 4 lbs., more than the HM100 with the mic. The flash unit will cost several hundred more dollars.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 07:24 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Robert Rogoz View Post
Parmar, as far as stills, first of all decide what system you want- Canon or Nikon. Don't even consider anything else. Nikon tends to be more $$$ and one drawback is pinkish skin tones, so you'll have to do a lot of correcting in photoshop. Just collect glass, don't worry too much about the body. And always buy the top quality, as you will need it.
My though is also as far a s video you will need a lot of help- editing, sound and such. It's not a solo gig and my best advice is to hook up with some small production company.
Thank you, Canon would be great but maybe intially I will go with Fuji S5pro and JVC HM100, I have JVC HD7.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 07:28 PM   #37
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How many people are on your staff? Will you be shooting video or stills. If you shoot video, perhaps the stills photographer will have his own equipment.

If you have not been shooting either video or stills yet professionally (or an an amateur), I suggest you start with one, then add the other one.

If you are shooting still photos of weddings, you will also need to consider a flash system. You will also need at least two cameras, in my opinion to shoot still photos at weddings.

If you do not have experience with digital photography, before buying a digital camera, I think it's necessary to rent or borrow a could of different ones and try them out.

There is no point in buying equipment that you will end up never using. Get the basics for your main purpose, for example, shooting video at weddings, then use it and build on it according to your needs and style of shooting. A large percentage of the dvinfo.net Private Classifieds are practically new items, in many cases purchased originally because the way things seemed they would be turned out not.

When it comes to buying digital cameras, buying a less expensive camera is not necessarily buying an inferior camera.

By the way, the Canon 5D MkII with the basic top quality 24-70mm lens will cost about $4000. The combo weighs over 4 lbs., more than the HM100 with the mic. The flash unit will cost several hundred more dollars.
Thank you and I understood what you said. Yes Indeed Canon 5DMKII would be very costly and bulky!

So you want me to buy HM100 wit Fuji S100fs, right?, this would be initially buying than I can add Nikon or Canon DSLR, right?

Kaushik
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Old July 17th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Kaushik Parmar View Post
Thank you and I understood what you said. Yes Indeed Canon 5DMKII would be very costly and bulky!

So you want me to buy HM100 wit Fuji S100fs, right?, this would be initially buying than I can add Nikon or Canon DSLR, right?

Kaushik
If I were you, until I got experience with digital photography, I would not buy a camera with interchangeable lenses.

There is a big investment in lenses, and once you commit, you are kind of stuck with the brand you choose. Canon has been the standard pro camera, and Nikon came on the scene in an impressive way a few months ago. Pentax just made an entry about 18 months ago and came out with an impressive offering in its new model this month.

I bought Pentax, because I used Pentax still cameras around the world for many years. The trademark has been simple and lightweight with outstanding lenses. Pentax is following this tradition with its entry into DSLRs, and I needed the lightweight and smaller size. I also have several old Pentax lenses I can use on the new body, and I like the new fixed folcal length lenses that Pentax has. However, my use of the still camera is rather specialized, and I'm not necessarily recommending it to someone else without understanding thoroughly their needs and experience.

That said, buying into any DSLR system is a commitment, and the purchaser should have a thorough understanding of the pros and cons of the systems offered by the various companies.

Nevertheless, for a first DSLR type camera, I believe a fixed lens version is the best choice, for both cost and utility. Remember, a $400 camera today shoots pictures as good or better than the top DSLR cameras of five to seven years ago.

You may get interested in photography and end up with a top-of-the-line system. However, the grab and shoot fixed lens camera is always going to have a place, especially if you are also a videographer.

I don't know if the fixed lens Fuji is necessarily the best choice, but I think it's the type of camera that is best to start with until you really know what you need. The truth is, you may hate still photography, prefer to concentrate on video and get a partner who does the still work.

One other thing. How are you going to use the wedding stills? Do these go into one of those type of videos common in India where there are hundreds of still pictures? If so, a high megapixel pro DSLR that shoots RAW is not what you want. You will want to shoot jpegs of rather low megapixel count (as compared to what cameras can shoot today), with a camera that does a very good job of with auto settings. The big pro camera is likely to be able to be set for this, but it is also likely overkill.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 10:25 PM   #39
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Thank you very much, you give your lot of time.

Kaushik
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Old July 17th, 2009, 10:38 PM   #40
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Sorry, Kaushik, for some reason I thought you were in India.

For the still camera, it would be a good idea to go into a big photo store (if you are in New Jersey, can you get to B&H), and get your hands on the different cameras.
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Old July 17th, 2009, 11:50 PM   #41
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Sorry, Kaushik, for some reason I thought you were in India.

For the still camera, it would be a good idea to go into a big photo store (if you are in New Jersey, can you get to B&H), and get your hands on the different cameras.
Jack Walker,

You guessed right, I am now in India, I stayed couples of years in USA. I returned India, I wll be here. I know if I would have been in USA, I would have tried my hands on each cameras, and it is not possible here in India, you can not get expensive cameras in the retail counter, just basic would be available, but yes you can order it without seeing it! unfortunet!

I will have to change my profile, it shows NJ, I know, I use to stay in NJ.

Kaushik
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