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Old March 12th, 2004, 12:00 AM   #1
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What's the typical rendertime for 1 hour DV?

meaning you took whatever amount of footage (could be 10 hrs) brought them in and cut them down to 1 hour. no special fx, some basic titles, maybe a short credit, ya know a usual production. how long does it take you to render the final results to a DVD-compatible file using a p4 3ghz, athlon 3000+, etc. trying to find out for a contest i'm doing that is time constrained.
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Old March 12th, 2004, 08:50 AM   #2
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Well, if it's not too many titles and absolutely NO special effects, maybe 15 to 30 minutes.

I do a weekly 1 hour program on which we add several titles (maybe 5-6 minutes total will be covered with titles). When doing a PTT (not a full render) on my PIV 2.8GHz laptop, it takes about 15 minutes. A full render will take longer because the non-changed sections will need to be copied.
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Old March 12th, 2004, 10:46 PM   #3
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Depends on the quality of the encoding job you want.

ProCoder Express running inside of Canopus' Edius takes from better than real-time to 2X real-time depending on whether one selects speed or quality. This is for CBR encoding. VBR encoding takes longer but not too bad.

Single P4C 2.4 Ghz, 1 gig memory full-bandwidth memory, Asus P4C800 Deluxe. LAN running.
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Old March 13th, 2004, 12:35 AM   #4
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what's PTT?
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Old March 13th, 2004, 04:51 AM   #5
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Print to Tape.
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Old March 13th, 2004, 07:03 AM   #6
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Yes, Print To Tape. It also totally depends on the NLE. My timings were for Vegas. Premiere, Avid, and others will give different times. Plus these times can be changed if you use any hardware assistance.

Your best solution would be to do a sample project similar to what you think you will be doing and timing the render.
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Old March 13th, 2004, 07:42 AM   #7
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I have a P4, 1.8 and Premiere mpeg encoder. One hour at 8000kbs Constant Bit Rate takes about 7 hours. I know this is really slow but the DVD quality at this rate on DVD is OUTSTANDING.

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Old March 13th, 2004, 07:50 AM   #8
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Oops.... Missed the "DVD Compatible file" part. Yep, that's going to take several hours for a 1 hour source UNLESS you use some kind of real-time hardware OR print to an external desktop recorder.
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Old March 13th, 2004, 12:31 PM   #9
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yeah this is for that 48 hour contest thingy i'm doing with a team. they want to edit up til the last possible hours. the deadline is sunday 7PM. they wanna go til 4 or 5PM and burn a DVD. i've been telling that it's almost IMPOSSIBLE to do that. but then again it is for a 4-8 min short not a full 60min dv. it appears then that we either need to PTT or take one less day of filming footages. which means we'll need to finish principal by saturday night or sunday morning @Latest... wow. i'm surprised that rendering still takes this long.
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Old March 13th, 2004, 02:50 PM   #10
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A 4 - 8 minute clip shouldn't take that long to render. However, make sure you leave yourself some play room (remember that burning takes time too). If you can do some DV-AVI rendering along the way, the MPEG render would be pretty fast. For example, if you did 4 minutes worth the first day and already had the rendered by the time the second day started, you'd only have 4 minutes left to render the next day.

Do some tests along the way to get an idea on the timing needed.
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Old March 14th, 2004, 12:05 AM   #11
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Why not just convert in a simple DVD authoring setup and let it burn directly to the disk?

8 minutes would take around 20 minutes total IIRC on my setup at 4X burn speed and using MyDVD. Encore takes a bit longer to work through the menus but seems to encode fairly fast.

ProCoder is probably the software speed and quality king right now.
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Old March 16th, 2004, 10:01 AM   #12
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about 3-4 hours / 1hour of DV. (Vegas4)
Athlon XP +2000, ~700MB SDRAM PC 133. You'll get shorter time with DDRAM. (10-20% maybe more, depending on DDRAM speed). I didn't notice an improvement on MPEG2 rendering time when going from 256MB SDRAM PC133 to ~700MBRAM... Also, I have a cheap MoBo...
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Old March 16th, 2004, 10:26 AM   #13
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If you have a spare $60 U.S., you might consider ProCoder Express. Fast and extremely good quality. 2-pass VBR is also fast.
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Old March 17th, 2004, 04:54 AM   #14
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Basically, that's impossible to answer. Due to:

1) encoder you are using

2) settings you are using (CBR, VBR, how many passes, bitrate etc.)

3) your computer specs

4) whether you are saving to the same drive as reading

etc. etc. Best is to do some testing with various demo products
to see quality versus speed. ProCoder (2 or Express) is relative
fast and definitely good quality as Mike said. Best quality MPEG2
encoding uses at least 2 pass VBR (variable bitrate) encoding.
The more passes, the longer you'll wait.
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