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Old January 12th, 2003, 01:36 PM   #1
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Internal verses External Hard Disk Drives for video editing.

My current computer system has two internal Maxtor hard disk drives. One for applications, the second for audio/video files. Unfortunately, the second hard disk drive is only 20 GB's (both run at 7200 rpm). This may be just fine for audio recording, but I'm finding out that it is quite limiting for video recording.

So . . . . I want to upgrade! While reading and researching the various hard disk drives that can be purchased, I stumbled across EXTERNAL hard disk drives (both USB 2 and IEEE 1394) that run at 7200 rpm! This got me quite excited! I hope to purchase either and internal or external hard disk drive that stores about 120 GB's of data. (I have a 40 GB USB 2 external hard disk drive that I used primarily for archiving. . . and it runs slow, certainly not at 7200 rpm).

Here are my questions:

1) Is it possible to work with an external hard disk drive (that runs at 7,200 rpm) for video editing (I use Vegas Video 3) ?

2) If you DO recommend an external hard disk drive, which brand would you recommend?

3) What problems might I encounter with an external hard disk drive (that runs at 7200 rpm)?

3) If you do NOT recommend an external hard disk drive, which INTERNAL hard disk drive(s) would you recommend?

My computer set up:

Dell Precision Workstation 420
Pentium III 733
512 MG DDRAM
2 hard disk drives (both run at 7200 rpm)
Windows XP Pro
Vegas Video
Canon GL2
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Old January 12th, 2003, 05:41 PM   #2
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I don't think 7200 rpm versus 5400 will make a lot of difference
when doing DV editing (which is only 3.6 MB/s). 7200 rpm drives
get quite hot and that might be a problem. I'm doing editing and
capturing on my laptop and that surely does NOT have a 7200
rpm drive.

I would be more worried with your interface. USB 2.0 should
be fast enough, but I've never trusted that bus much for fast
demanding applications. Also, keep in mind that you might have
an USB 2.0 device but most PC's do not yet!!!! You
can get a USB 2.0 PCI card though.

Personally I'd go with firewire drive because I think that gives
you the best expension options as well. You can hook this up
to different systems with ease (PC, Mac) and you can also use
it for direct harddisk recorders.

Ofcourse it all depends on what you already have, need and
are willing to pay. There are also external cases available with
an USB 2.0 or firewire interface (or both!) in which you can put
just a NORMAL harddisk. This might be a lot cheaper and interesting
since you can upgrade the harddisk and any time and just keep
the interface!

Good luck on your choice
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Old January 12th, 2003, 07:23 PM   #3
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I actually went with a $90 ADS 1394 Pyro Drive kit that let me pick any IDE hard drive to use as an external firewire drive. The case has its own fan etc. Then I went with a high spin high buffer drive (also about $100) and it works great.

Tom
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Old January 12th, 2003, 08:31 PM   #4
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Seems like a good choice. . . .

<<<-- Originally posted by Tom Christensen : I actually went with a $90 ADS 1394 Pyro Drive kit that let me pick any IDE hard drive to use as an external firewire drive. The case has its own fan etc. Then I went with a high spin high buffer drive (also about $100) and it works great.

Tom -->>>

A couple of questions:

1) Any problems capturing video via the IEEE 1394 card to the 1394 Pyro Drive kit? Any significant problems?

2) Any problems editing the video/audio information stored on this external device (using an ultra ATA harddisk drive at 7200rpm)? Any problems accessing files; rendering files; etc? (I am using Sonic Foundry's Vegas Video 3 as my video editing software.)

Thank you for your posts.

Ted
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Old January 12th, 2003, 09:30 PM   #5
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Same here I'm using the Pyro Drive Kit with a Western Digital 100 GB drive, works great no problems capturing or rendering.

It's hooked up to an ancient Dell laptop running Studio DV 7 and VV3.
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Old January 12th, 2003, 09:49 PM   #6
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I sometimes use an external WD 7200 RPM drive. No problem with throughput, but the drive drops out if I cycle the power on the camcorder. I can power up the camcorder before booting, but that doesn't help when I switch tapes, for example. The camcorder and the drive are independently connected to the Adaptec duo-connect. I don't expect that rearranging the cabling will help, but I haven't tried. I could daisy chain out of the second port on the drive, but that is really electricaly identical to using the second port on the card.
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Old January 13th, 2003, 02:21 PM   #7
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In refer3ence to USB 2.0, I have been using an external 2.o drive for a year now with video, no problems whatsoever. I also have firewire drives. Both are good options.
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Old January 15th, 2003, 03:50 PM   #8
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drives

I suggest spending just al little more and getting 7200 RPM drives....I tried using 5400 RMP drives when I first built my system, and I found that under certain conditions, they would drop frames.....I have NEVER droped a frame with the 7200 RPM drives, and these days they cost only marginally more. Hardware raids will boost performance somewhat, and you can set up software raids easily with win2k, as long as you have enuf CPU power....I've been using maxstor and Quantum drives, they work great.
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Old January 16th, 2003, 12:32 AM   #9
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Recently recieved the IEEE 1394 Pyro Drive Kit with a Western Digital 120 GB drive (7200rpm). There was minimal hassles in setting up this device to be recognized by the computer. Once formatted, etc, everthing seemed to work just fine! Seemed to handle the short 5 minute video test with a bunch of dissolves and effects without a problem. Plan on using this HD until it's full. Once full, I'll just purchase another one to place into the Pyro Drive Kit. Way cool! Understand that up until a few days ago, I never heard of such a beast!

Appreciate the advice provided here and a couple of other video web sites I visit. The information shared here is gratefully recieved.

Now. . . on to some lurking, reading and learning. . . .


Ted
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Old January 23rd, 2003, 11:52 PM   #10
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Just saw that ADS has developed a Pyro DV Drive that is a camera-direct-to-drive device. Sports a one button record.

You have to dig on the web site to find it since it doesn't look like it is in the products section yet, just as a news release.

http://www.adstech.com/media/mediafiles/PR-DVExpo02.htm

For $599, looks to compete and bring the price down on these kind of devices.

Tom
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Old January 24th, 2003, 05:46 AM   #11
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Sounds interesting, but that drive is a bit small I think. Also they
don't report if it will support linked-recording (which the XL1s
for example supports where the harddisk will start recording
automatically when you hit the record button on the camera).

We'll have to wait and see.
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Old January 31st, 2003, 08:32 AM   #12
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Since last July, I've upgraded my Core Microsystems computer as follows:

1- 45 Gb IBM 7200 HD as my C Drive,
2- 120 Gb Western Digital 7200 HDrives as my D Drive for video. I use a RAID configuration for the D drive using Promise Fasttrack.

All drives are internal.

Operating system: Win 2000
Capture card: Canopus DVRaptor (not RT)

I have 5 projects thus far in my system with 3 of them over an hour long (edited). Never had a dropped frame.

The bottom line...if you are rendering projects with lots of special effects, overlays, moving titles...go with the 7200 rpm speed. You'll need the extra horsepower when rendering & playing back.
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