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Old February 17th, 2006, 02:57 PM   #1
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CPU Temp

I've been rendering a movie and normally it only takes a few hours on my system I have a pentuim 3.2 with the Asus P5AD2 Motherboard so I installed Asus Probe and it's showing a CPU temp at 70/C while I'm rendering so is this the problem shouldnt the temp be a bit lower? Thank's for any input and if I need a new cpu fan any recommendation?

Thank's
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Old February 17th, 2006, 06:32 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad Solo
I've been rendering a movie and normally it only takes a few hours on my system I have a pentuim 3.2 with the Asus P5AD2 Motherboard so I installed Asus Probe and it's showing a CPU temp at 70/C while I'm rendering so is this the problem shouldnt the temp be a bit lower? Thank's for any input and if I need a new cpu fan any recommendation?

Thank's
Nope, Pentium chips get hotter than a firecracker, that's been Intel's thorn in their side for years and what AMD continues to exploit. As long as the machine is not crashing your golden, If it does however then you need to explore better cooling cause rendering is pushing the processor to the max.

You might want to think about a card solution which can off-load the needs of your NLE to a dedicated card, I use the Canopus DV Raptor RT2 Max and it's benefit is renderless editing, the flip side benefit is during renderouts the speed is dramatically increased as the dedicated card handles all the calls for transitions and effects. Canopus no longer makes this card, but you can look at thier other solutions, also look at Matrox.

Miguel
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Old February 18th, 2006, 03:44 AM   #3
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yeah I would say that 70 is getting a bit on the high side. I am presuming you are running a prescott 3.2 CPU? Prescott's are known for running pretty hot but 70 is getting very hot.

I am not sure at what temperature thermal throttling kicks in on the Prescott 3.2 but I own a Pentium D 2.8 and thermal throttling kicks in at 66C. I have my CPU overclocked at the moment at 3.4Ghz with a SI-120 heatsink - idle it's 42 and under load it 60c. I would be looking at trying to reduce your temperature. Check out www.silentpcreview.com - they have a ton of info on the forums about CPU's and cooling.

What's your ambient room temperature as this will drastically effect your cooling capability?
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Old February 18th, 2006, 06:44 AM   #4
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Thank's all for the replies. I have a Pentium 4 640 Prescott 800MHz FSB 2MB L2 Cache LGA 775 EM64T Processor.My room temp is very cool I never use the heat. I believe it is throttling I just don't know what to do to get it to run cooler beside getting a new heatsink. Thank's all for the suggestions.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 03:24 PM   #5
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Hey Chad,

well if the ambient room temperature is low and you are not overclocking it then I would suggest the following could be wrong :

i) your ventilation and airflow in the case is poor. Take the side of the case of and monitor what temperature it get's to.

ii) the heatsink may need reseating on the cpu. You might want to reapply some heatsink compound and reseat the heatsink for a new seal.

The stock cooler on your prescott shouldn't be allowing the cpu to get to those temps.

Cheers

Robert
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Old February 19th, 2006, 07:25 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad Solo
I've been rendering a movie and normally it only takes a few hours on my system I have a pentuim 3.2 with the Asus P5AD2 Motherboard so I installed Asus Probe and it's showing a CPU temp at 70/C while I'm rendering so is this the problem shouldnt the temp be a bit lower? Thank's for any input and if I need a new cpu fan any recommendation?

Thank's
Is the cpu fan the one that came with the processor or not? With Asus Probe you should be able to monitor cpu fan speed: does it get faster when temp goes high or not? It should. A better (larger or dual fan system) fan would help. Lowering the temp at around 64-66 at full load would be ok - I think Asus Probe's treshold is 72oC.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 11:39 AM   #7
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Yes it's the stock fan and think it's a very poor design especially trying to install it. I will look into the fan speed and see if it gets faster under load.Thank's for the help.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 02:04 PM   #8
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OK I did some tests before I started the rendering I had a value on the fan at about 1765 once the rendering started it went up to 1864 for a second and then back down to 1820 and moved up and down and the temp got up to 71/C. I reset the heatsink and put some new artic silver 5 and still running hot. Any suggestion on a good heatsink? Thank's again for the help
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Old February 20th, 2006, 01:31 PM   #9
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if you're feeling brave...

you could try rigging up a liquid cooling system,

http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/produc...5/cl-w0075.asp

given that you are using a stock fan, i would place part of the blame there...

newegg shows fans with good data, esp. airflow...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...2&N=2000110062

I am using this cooler for my AMD-XP:

http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/axp-3200.html

granted this chip doesnt have such major heat problems, but its a great cooler nonetheless...

also, an unappealing as it seems, removing both sides of the case and letting it run open greatly increases ventilation (which might also be a problem)...

also, seating a cpu is a really delicate task, i would make sure you cleaned off all the old gook with alcohol or arctic silver's cleaning fluid before you laid down a new layer of paste, and make sure you lay it down nice and smooth, covering all the areas..

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_s...structions.htm

sorry if i'm repeating stuff you already know...

-raza
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 03:55 PM   #10
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There are plenty of heatsink/fans available that will outperform the stock Intel heatsink/fan. A good place to find one is newegg.com. If you read the reviews of the different offerings on the site carefully, you should be able to find one that will work well for you. Coolermaster and Thermaltake are a couple of brands that generally offer reasonably good quality. I wouldn't go nuts with a liquid cooling setup, unless you want to seriously overclock maybe (not a great idea).
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 10:54 PM   #11
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The stock CPU + retail will work fine as long as you install it properly. The stock heatsink is actually the easiest to install, and harder than the other solutions to screw up. If you install it right, the CPU will be well cooled and have lots of headroom/safety margin (some people actually use it to overclock).

Yes other heatsink/fan combinations are better, but they are also unnecessary unless you want to overclock (which is a waste of time in my opinion, because it will lead to instability or you using time testing your computer).

2- Some motherboards and CPUs will report the temperatures differently than others, so you can only compare temperatures if the CPU and motherboard are the same. i.e. Abit, in the intel 865/875 chipset days had motherboards which reported temperatures higher than their competitors.

3- Applying Artic Silver 5 should lower temperatures a few degrees compared to the waxy stuff that comes with the standard heatsink. This was my experience with my Pentium 2.6C (which runs cooler than the newer Pentiums).

4- If Asus Probe warns you that the temperatures are too high, then they're too high. Your processor may slow itself to half speed to ensure stability. Any higher and it'll automatically shut itself off.

Otherwise you're fine.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 08:42 PM   #12
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Thank's all for the replies. I ended up getting a ARCTIC COOLING Freezer 7 Pro heatsink and boy what a difference. I'm rendering right now and it has not gone over 55c and it idles at around 37c.Thank's all again for the help it's much appreciated.

Chad
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Old February 25th, 2006, 05:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raza Ahmad
I am using this cooler for my AMD-XP:

granted this chip doesnt have such major heat problems, but its a great cooler nonetheless...

Well, I have to disagree on AMD chips not having major heat problems.

To start with my AMD 3200XP cruises at 62 degrees C, using the original AMD fan. I already tried a slightly better fan by Spire but it didn't improve much, or was even worst. I live in Rio de Janeiro, but I rarely use air-conditioning due to temp problems in my room. Temps in Rio are very hot in January and February, the rest of the year being around 25 C. As I live on eighth floor my room runs quite cool.

When I am playing games it's not rare the game taking me out, probably due to heat problems.

I have plenty of fans on my case, besides the one on the supply. One of the HDs, one on the back and one on the side, blowing straight into the CPU. I do not overclock.

I have considered using a larger case, but the thing is that if I put my hand on the heatsink it's not that hot. I am used to work with audio electronics, particularly power amps, so I am familiar with using thermal paste. I wonder what might be happening or how to go about it.

Would a better heatsink, like Thermalright SLK800, do a better job?


Carlos
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Old February 25th, 2006, 02:03 PM   #14
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Carlos -

I'd definitely suggest you get a new fan/heatsink. I never use stock fans on a modern CPU, even when a computer is in a nice, cool, air conditioned environment.

I am not familiar with the model you mentioned, but if you read enough user feedback comments on the model (like at newegg.com), you should be able to get a good idea if it will work for you or not. I'll just mention, that a good fan doesn't have to be fancy or expensive. I pay particular attention to over-clockers comments, because they really challenge fan/heatsink performance, and when they say something works for them, you know that it's been tried and worked for someone in a relatively demanding environment (I DO NOT suggest overclocking a CPU).

The way you described your chassis fan setup, it sounds like you might be saying that all the fans blow into the case. If that is the way you have it setup, reverse the rear fan to blow outwards from the case.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 02:45 PM   #15
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Thanks for your comments, Robert.

About the rear fan, it blows the air out, as it should, not in. And the air does come out warm. The one up front blows through the HDs, and that air should go through the back too.

Only the one on the side blows in, straight into the CPU and the video board.

What should I look for at Newegg? Feedback from people using a CPU similar to mine?

Your advice on listening to what overclockers do is certainly a good one, but where are them? Which is a good forum to go to about computer matters? Once I went to an Nvidia one, if I am not wrong, but they were very rude, didn't like it at all. Moderators did not seem to moderate too much.


Carlos
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