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Old May 18th, 2007, 05:07 PM   #1
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Sata Moving Very Slow

I just bought a sata external hdd 400gb. and I hooked it up and it said on the box that the transfer rate would be about 1.5G/second and it doesnt seem like it, it is taking like a minute to transfer a 700mb file.

I have already installed my raid drivers and stuff and I have installed the driver for the harddisk....and its still moving slow. What should I do?




Thnx,
~ Tatsuya
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Old May 18th, 2007, 05:25 PM   #2
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Keep in mind, that it's 1.5 giga BITS per second. You are transferring a 700 mega BYTE file. It's 8 bits to 1 byte plus error correction overhead. SATA I is 1.5/mbs and SATA II is 3.0/mbs.

Did you install RAID drivers for a single drive? You only need RAID for multiple disk drives that you want to either bond together in a striped array for increased data throughput, or in a parallel fashion for 'mirroring' to protect data integrity should one of the drives fail.

-gb-
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Old May 18th, 2007, 05:50 PM   #3
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o, I thought it was gigabytes....And I have SATA150, is that fast? Also, is about 30 sec. for 700mb normal for what I have? Or am I better off with usb?
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Old May 18th, 2007, 07:01 PM   #4
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Very roughly speaking, if your disk is not filled to the rim, you can expect transfer rates in the following order of magnitude:

1. USB2: around 20 MB/s
2. Fire wire: around 30 MB/s
3. SATA1: around 50 MB/s
4: SATA2: around 60 MB/s

There is no difference in performance between SATA and eSATA.
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Old May 19th, 2007, 11:27 AM   #5
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Also remember that SATA 1.5 gigabit is the theoritcal limit of the Interface. No HDD moves that fast today.

Most drives today tops out around 65mb/sec (on large files) - small files will suffer a greater overhead and performance may go down to 4-5mb/sec

//Lazze
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Old May 23rd, 2007, 03:03 PM   #6
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From Wiki

SATA 1.5 Gbit/s
First-generation SATA interfaces, also known as SATA/150 or (erroneously) as SATA 1, communicate at a rate of 1.5 gigabits per second (Gbit/s). Taking into account 8b10b coding overhead, the actual uncoded transfer-rate is 1.2 Gbit/s, or 150 megabytes per second (MB/s). In actual operation, SATA/150 and PATA/133 are comparable in terms of their theoretical burst-throughput. However, newer SATA devices offer enhancements (such as native command queuing) to SATA's performance in a multitask environment.

During the initial period after SATA/150's finalization, both adapter and drive manufacturers used a "bridge chip" to convert existing designs with the PATA-interface to the SATA-interface. Bridged drives have a SATA connector, may include either or both kinds of power connectors, and generally perform identically to native drives. They generally lack support for some SATA-specific features (such as NCQ). Bridged products gradually gave way to native SATA products.


SATA 3.0 Gbit/s
Soon after SATA/150's introduction, a number of shortcomings in the original SATA were observed. First and foremost, at the application-level, SATA's operational model emulated PATA in that the interface could only handle 1 pending transaction at a time. SCSI disks have long benefited from the SCSI-interface's support for multiple outstanding requests, allowing the drive targets to re-order the requests to optimize response-time. Native command queuing (NCQ) adds this capability to SATA. NCQ is an optional feature, and may be used in both SATA 1.5 Gbit/s or SATA 3.0 Gbit/s devices.

First-generation SATA devices were scarcely faster than legacy parallel ATA/133 devices. So a 3 Gbit/s signaling rate was added to the Physical layer (PHY layer), effectively doubling data throughput from 150 MB/s to 300 MB/s. SATA/300's transfer rate is expected to satisfy drive throughput requirements for some time, as the fastest desktop hard disks barely saturate a SATA/150 link. This is why a SATA data cable rated for 1.5Gbps will currently handle second generation, SATA 3.0Gbps sustained and burst data transfers without any loss of performance.

Backward compatibility between SATA 1.5 Gbit/s controllers and SATA 3.0 Gbit/s devices was important, so SATA/300's autonegotiation sequence is designed to fallback to SATA/150 speed (1.5 Gbit/s rate) when in communication with such devices. In practice, some older SATA controllers do not properly implement SATA speed negotiation. Affected systems require user-intervention to manually set the SATA 3.0 Gbit/s peripherals to 1.5 Gbit/s mode, generally through the use of a jumper. [1] Known faulty chipsets include the VIA VT8237 and VT8237R south bridges, and the VIA VT6420 and VT6421L standalone SATA controllers. [2] SiS's 760 and 964 chipsets also initially exhibited this problem, though it can be rectified with an updated SATA controller ROM.[citation needed]

The 3.0 Gbit/s specification has been very widely referred to as “Serial ATA II” (“SATA II”), contrary to the wishes of the Serial ATA standards organization that authored it. The official website notes that SATA II was in fact that organization's name at the time, the SATA 3.0 Gbit/s specification being only one of many that the former SATA II defined, and suggests that “SATA 3.0 Gbit/s” be used instead. (The Serial ATA standards organization has since changed names, and is now “The Serial ATA International Organization”, abbreviated SATA-IO.) Most SATA drive and controller manufacturers also do not use the term “SATA II”.

SATA 3.0 Gbit/s is sometimes also referred to as SATA 3.0 or SATA/300, continuing the line of ATA/100, ATA/133 and SATA/150.
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Old May 23rd, 2007, 06:30 PM   #7
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"SCSI disks have long benefited from the SCSI-interface's support for multiple outstanding requests, allowing the drive targets to re-order the requests to optimize response-time. Native command queuing (NCQ) adds this capability to SATA. NCQ is an optional feature, and may be used in both SATA 1.5 Gbit/s or SATA 3.0 Gbit/s devices."

That could be a very important feature for video work. You don't want some insignificant random system access of your hard drive to get in the way of reading/writing video. This feature should help a drive system juggle multiple requests without bogging down.
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