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Old November 26th, 2007, 12:49 PM   #1
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Your First Film?

For those who have filmed a short or feature or some sort of movie, what was your first experience like? What advice can you share.
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Old November 26th, 2007, 03:22 PM   #2
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lol i think you've opened pandoras box with that question!

my biggest bit of advice is plan EVERYTHING and when you've done that........plan some more, i think it was hitchcock who said "if you fail to prepare then prepare to fail"

Andy.
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Old November 26th, 2007, 05:34 PM   #3
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My first movie was shot on Super 8 (no I'm not that old, it was pretty retro even then). It was pretty painless but it was just me as crew and three friends for actors, no sound or lighting to worry about. Though I have to admit I didn't know how to achieve the things I saw in movies. I don't really have much advice to impart from that, most things I learnt on subsequent films, though looking at it now I wish I'd had someone to scream "Lay off the bloody zooms" at me at the time.

My first proper film (i.e. with a crew and with a script that wasn't being made up on the spot) was made at university a few years later and if I have one piece of advice it's keep working on the script until you're really happy with it, and read it to loads of people and get as much feedback as you can.
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Old November 26th, 2007, 06:10 PM   #4
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Just done our first short...in a 48hour film marathon...
http://www.vimeo.com/400252
amazing experience and fun.
Plan, think, plan
Audio essential to get this right
Keep it simple...
Plan some more
Have responsibilities there was only 2 or us but it still made a difference
Have a length you will work to...edit with a feel for the nd result not the shots you neccesarily liked.
If its an intensive edit ( i think tere are lots of benefits on this)...have coffee breaks and review after a break...you'll spot stuff better.
Good luck have as much fun as we did...
oh and any comments on our film appreciated!
(48 hours-shot on JVC HD7 with brevis 35mm adaptor, using onboard mic!!, edited in Vegas)
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Old November 27th, 2007, 12:25 AM   #5
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Why post a link if it's protected so we can't see it?
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Old November 27th, 2007, 11:18 AM   #6
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My first move was a huge learning experience. It was a monster flick shot on many locations with hundreds of extras and a cast of about twenty. It took a year to finish and another year to bring to market. It has been distributed in US and abroad . And considered a major failure by most everyone involved. I experienced every emotion you can have during the process but I look back and say it was fun and I would like to do it again.
I started off as a stunt man then actor and ended up as second unit director and helped in Post.

Besides planing which is a given I would say that having a good director is a must. He must be able to let those who can act. And draw a performance out of those that canít. He should be supportive and firm and willing to see a diamond in the rough. He should have the ability to listen to cast and crew and consider other peoples input and yet be firm in his decisions. Making a movie is not a one person endeavor it is a melding of all involved.
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Old November 27th, 2007, 03:29 PM   #7
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duh-eerh is that better?
http://www.vimeo.com/400252
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Old November 27th, 2007, 07:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Little View Post
Besides planing which is a given I would say that having a good director is a must. He must be able to let those who can act. And draw a performance out of those that canít.
That's quotable - it's going up on my wall.
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Old November 29th, 2007, 05:45 PM   #9
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First Film

I also made my film on Super 8. It took 9 months to complete using all amateur talent. Cost about $300, mostly for film. Editing is a real challenge with Super 8 as sound and picture are separated. Video is great. You can see my film at http://www.revver.com/watch/393480/starstrike/
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Old December 1st, 2007, 08:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Graham View Post
lol i think you've opened pandoras box with that question!

my biggest bit of advice is plan EVERYTHING and when you've done that........plan some more, i think it was hitchcock who said "if you fail to prepare then prepare to fail"

Andy.
Yep. Ditto. This cost me about $5,000 to make. Planning wasn't everything but it was a lot. May not be the greatest but we accomplished everything we set out to. Actually got a few good reviews.
http://www.createspace.com/Customer/...1&rewrite=true

-Nate

Last edited by Nathan Brendan Masters; December 1st, 2007 at 08:29 PM. Reason: added link
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Old December 27th, 2007, 12:07 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Little View Post
My first move was a huge learning experience. It was a monster flick shot on many locations with hundreds of extras and a cast of about twenty. It took a year to finish and another year to bring to market. It has been distributed in US and abroad . And considered a major failure by most everyone involved. I experienced every emotion you can have during the process but I look back and say it was fun and I would like to do it again.
.
What movie is this? I'm curious enough to check it out.
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Old December 27th, 2007, 01:18 PM   #12
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While you are busy planning and then planning some more, a great idea is to try and help out on other peoples projects. By volunteering to carry heavy stuff around the set you will get to see what other people are doing right and wrong and quite possibly meet some new friends that can help you out when the time comes. While you are there I would stay focused on that project and not be talking up your own.

Competing in a 48 hour film challenge in your area is also a good way to force yourself to complete something from start to finish. Even if its not that good, or you don't even finish, you will have uncovered some of the trouble spots your proceses. This is also a good networking opportunity.
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Old December 27th, 2007, 03:15 PM   #13
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Ah, the good ol' 48 hour film festivals. Most of the people who help out on my films are students. A second year film student tends to very very knowledgeable on camera movement and a first year student (or even one who hasn't gotten to touch the camera yet) will be very glad to learn. All you have to do is direct and tell them exactly what you want. I normally handle the camera when I'm not in a scene. Shooting indy B action or horror films are a pretty fun way to learn too. You can see the final fruit of our labors here: http://www.tcmech.com as I think we had way too much fun with this project. The beauty of this is we actually got a few decent reviews (only one bad one actually). I will say this, keeping tight reigns on the little money you're working with is also super important.

-Nate

Last edited by Nathan Brendan Masters; December 27th, 2007 at 03:21 PM. Reason: added the last sentences.
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