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Old June 1st, 2008, 10:42 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post

He was mentioning the getting the script made with a reasoniable budget, rather than low budget.

True.. I would like the script that I have written be produced by someone who is better able to do a good job than I am.

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Oh, one thing, given that Terry mightn't know this, make sure the script is correctly formatted, otherwise they won't even start reading it. People do hand in scripts in all states, including handwritten and not having it correct looks unprofessional and given a big pile of scripts in front of them, a reader will just move onto the next one if it's not correctly formatted.
Yes, I printed off the script for Robin Hood Prince of Theifs to format my script. I find that most every script begins with FADE IN:
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Old June 1st, 2008, 11:10 AM   #47
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Lol, cheers brian, you should download it sometime id like your opinion....leave it downloading some day........and dont judge me on the acting, we're gonna get american or canadian actors for the film its self.

Anyway poor old Terry is probably put off filmmaking for good..... i'll put the nail in the coffin.......even if you get funding for your script youll get shafted by the distributor and investors :) they need to get every penny back before you make any money.....the only worth while thing you get out of the deal is a nice shiny imdb page and the chance to work again which in my opinion is a great thing.

good luck Terry

Thank you Andy! You sound like you were out of your mind drunk. You should have been with me last night haha.

Well I'm not entirely discouraged by this thread, however it has made me reconsider my approach to making this film. I do understand that no one is just going to give you money to make your film. I agree that sometimes people get into a fantasy world thinking that "oh I can make films, that looks so easy, all they did was bla bla.." For this reason, is why I get on here asking questions so that I can shed some of the misconceptions I may have about the film making process.

BTW. I like the idea of the shot list. It is something to consider which I appreciate tremendously because this is something that I wouldn't learn about if someone with experience didn't bring it up. However, I imagine on larger budgeted film sets, isn't there a person who goes out to search for sets...say a forest scene or a street scene etc..? I would think that the person who does that would also write up a shot list..
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Old June 1st, 2008, 11:27 AM   #48
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BTW (again..) I wasn't tuned out, I just work during the day, come home read everyone's posts and by that time I'm doseing off. Not because its boaring haha, but because I'm so tired.

Yesterday I found my begining scene for a short film I want to make. Everyone was telling me that making a few short films would be good practice... I don't know if anyone else does this...but normally I will listen to music and imagine scenes...

Recently I have been reading the script of a movie while watching it. I printed off the script for Braveheard and just watched it a few days ago. I do this to get an idea of what is necessary to consider when making a film. However I do understand that from paper to film, the scene changes considerably.

Andy...I am STILL downloading this damn promo video!! how big is it? haha
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Old June 1st, 2008, 12:04 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
Yes, I printed off the script for Robin Hood Prince of Theifs to format my script. I find that most every script begins with FADE IN
I don't think anyone is trying to discourage you but there is a lot to learn out there...

You wouldn't believe me if I told you how important formatting is and I can't blame you to not know about the idiosyncrasies of proper industry formatting. Read this: StorySense - Script Format Guide. Actually, spend a day reading everything on their site.

..and then some...
You don't have to have your finger on the Hollywood pulse to know that studios are in "sequel & franchise" mode. Not in the least because any feature requires a 25M marketing budget nowadays (US Domestic only!).

So even a low budget feature that only cost a couple of million to make, needs some serious boxoffice to recoup the markeing that's tacked on.

If I recall correctly Robert Rodriques' "El Mariachi" only cost 50K to make (on spec), but when it was picked up it was 2M to finish. No idea what the marketing was back then. I could be off some on the exact numbers, but you get the point.

Off course it was remade in Desperado (and D2) with some starpower attached to actually make it profitable.

Even A-list writers have it hard selling their spec scripts. It's a who-knows-who business and unless you can show it will make money, like if it has a frachise or A-list actor/actrice attached, they are going to turn you down.

Any reason for turning you down is basically what they'll be looking for even when they've agreed to look at your script (or more likely synopsis). Just your log line not being strong enough will be enough to skip over you. Or improper formatting...

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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
BTW. I like the idea of the shot list.
My advice is to leave anything to do with production alone and concentrate on getting your script to be the best it can be and then try to get it out there.

If you set your goals high (and why not) you need an agent and it will be just as difficult to get them to read anything.

Don't spread yourself too thin, but look at other ways to get your ideas and stories out there. Write more of them, get them published, work with other creatives to produce them. It will all help you to build a network, possibly a career.

I'm not a big fan of script competitions or sites for publishiing your scripts (like InkTip) but there are some successes there.

If you feel adventurous the Writers Guild of America publishes a list with Guild Signatory Agents and Agency. You can send query letter to them with the log line and a synopis asking them if they want to read the script.

George/
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Old June 1st, 2008, 12:32 PM   #50
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Hey George, thanks for the feedback. I honestly do intend on focusing on my script as a primary objective but my original question was what should I consider after I have a solid script. People have said rewrite and honestly I am in the process of doing so. However, I was simply interested to know what I need to consider after I believe that there is nothing else to add to my script and am ready to try to start the journey of making it a film.

The comment about the shot list was just an appreciation of some experienced insight.

Again, thank you.
-Terry.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 12:55 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
However, I was simply interested to know what I need to consider after I believe that there is nothing else to add to my script and am ready to try to start the journey of making it a film.
From my own experience, the best thing to do is just make a short film. Put your script in a drawer, find some friends with the necessary gear and some interest in making fools of themselves, find a location, write a 5-7 page scene for that location, shoot it, edit it and show it to everyone you know.

One project I participated in was the 48 Hour Film Project back in April in Philadelphia. The Louisville weekend is mid-July this year. Having such a short timeline forces you to be structured and well-prepared, but given the "curveballs" they throw at you, you also have to improvise. After that weekend, I had an instant appreciation for just how difficult it is to do this stuff. At the same time, I no longer feel overwhelmed at the prospect of doing it again. It's amazing how much you can learn in such a short period of time.

As everyone else has already said, your first attempt will be awful. Expect it. Embrace it. No one learns anything from instant success. What you're hoping for are the one or two things that turn out exactly the way you envisioned them, and that's what will keep you from being completely discouraged. It's like golf...it's the one good shot during the round that keeps you coming back.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 01:02 PM   #52
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Whilst you start with a "finished" script there will be rewrites and changes all through production...

The script may be "improved" to fit anything from actors to locations and for any reason, including budget restraints or practicality.

From the original script a shooting script is created and a shotlist/shooting schedule is worked out. This basically puts everything in an order in which it can be shot efficiently. Versioning is important in production (because of all the rewrites).

Talent gets "sides" with their lines/interaction; yet another script.

Script writeing software can usually create the different script layouts for you (shooting, sides, etc.)

George/

P.S. If you have a feature length script, quite possibly there are a few scenes or twists that you can rework into a short for some hands-on experience. Not unusual to play around with the same theme.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 01:20 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
Andy...I am STILL downloading this damn promo video!! how big is it? haha

Lmao, sorry man it was as small as i could get it and still maintain the quality.

Yeah you were right friday night was crazy, i paid for it the next day though......at least i had this thread to keep my mind off it :).

As for who writes up the shotlist i still recommend doing it yourself cause it really gets you into the nuts and bolts of the film and thats the kind of intimate knowlage of the film you need.

Also i think location hunting is one of the best parts of filmmaking......its a good feeling when you find that perfect place like i did in my promo
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Old June 1st, 2008, 02:01 PM   #54
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From my own experience, the best thing to do is just make a short film. Put your script in a drawer, find some friends with the necessary gear and some interest in making fools of themselves, find a location, write a 5-7 page scene for that location, shoot it, edit it and show it to everyone you know.
Hey Sean, thanks for the feedback. I do intend on creating a short film that I hope will get me started in the processes of making a film on my own. I have been in the process of writing a script for it lately. Just yesterday I found the first scene for it.

You mentioned the Louisville weekend? what were you refering to? I live 20 minutes from Louisville Kentucky...
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Old June 1st, 2008, 02:08 PM   #55
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I finally got to see it after 20 minutes of downloading!! haha. I do admit it was worth it. It was well done. Which one was you? the guy in the first scene or the guy who blasted himself at the end?

The only thing though..nothing bad, but I thought the look of the shots were odd. Maybe it was the compression of the video over the internet, but it just seamed alittle wierd. Not like it was off but just..i dunno how to explain it honestly..it was like the gain or sharpness was turned up so much that it sort of distorted the colors maybe? I don't even know if that is what would do that to be honest but thats the only thing I saw that was alittle odd.

BTW, what frame rate was it shot in?
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Old June 1st, 2008, 02:09 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
You mentioned the Louisville weekend? what were you refering to? I live 20 minutes from Louisville Kentucky...
Check the list of cities at the link I posted. I believe the project is running in your town July 18th. You probably still have time to register. Some cities cap the number of entries, others don't. I'm not sure about Louisville.

For what it's worth, don't spend too much time on the script on your first short. It's sort of irrelevant. Lighting and sound are equally difficult with good scripts and bad scripts. Just go get your hands dirty, so to speak.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 02:12 PM   #57
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Check the list of cities at the link I posted. I believe the project is running in your town July 18th. You probably still have time to register. Some cities cap the number of entries, others don't. I'm not sure about Louisville.
Alright awesome, thanks! Unfortunately I will be in Portugal in July...

But thanks for letting me know!
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Old June 1st, 2008, 02:14 PM   #58
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I wasn't actually in it myself, i was the dop, i filmed it and edited it.

I think what your reffering to is the day for night filter i used, well its meant to be more like late evening. Its been re edited since then (minor changes).

I always shoot safe which means i get a good quality un filtered image and do all my correction in post so its non destructive.

I shot it on the jvc hd100 in HDV25p mode.

thanks for watching it.

Andy.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 03:12 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by Terry Lee View Post
.... However, I was simply interested to know what I need to consider after I believe that there is nothing else to add to my script and am ready to try to start the journey of making it a film.

The comment about the shot list was just an appreciation of some experienced insight.

Again, thank you.
-Terry.
The biggest problem with any writing, scripts included, is not adding things to the piece but figuring out what to take away. Polishing is a process of removing the superfluous in order to strengthen the essential.
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Old June 1st, 2008, 03:40 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by Sean Evans View Post

For what it's worth, don't spend too much time on the script on your first short. It's sort of irrelevant. Lighting and sound are equally difficult with good scripts and bad scripts. Just go get your hands dirty, so to speak.
OK for a quick play around, but if you want to have short that's does anywhere you need a really sharp script. You can get other people to DP and record sound.
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