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Old June 4th, 2008, 02:26 AM   #76
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Originally Posted by Andy Graham View Post
The mini35 and letus35 are designed to put the exact same field of view as a 35mm film camera on to the CCD chips, this coupled with film lenses gives you the same depth of field as a film camera, which also brings the problems of a film camera i.e shallow depth of field and not much room to move.
So bassically, The mini35 and the Letus35 just alows DV cameras to operate optically like film cameras correct? Would you think that would be pretty necessary? probably not since you don't use one and your shots are pretty damn good from what I saw with the promo trailer.

So what do you think with a follow focus then..should I even waste my time? I mean, I can get someone to be my focus puller, but honestly I don't see the need for me, someone who is just learning this stuff, to spend that kind of money on one.

I think all I'm gonna worry about is a matte box, hard drive for the hd200, battery pack (anton bauer..), filters for the matte... Boom mic... Does that seam a little bare?

anyway...I'll definately keep you in mind. I really appreciate you helping me out with this stuff. Honestly, no one around here is interested in film what so ever. What is your personal website?
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Old June 4th, 2008, 03:03 AM   #77
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So bassically, The mini35 and the Letus35 just alows DV cameras to operate optically like film cameras correct? Would you think that would be pretty necessary? probably not since you don't use one and your shots are pretty damn good from what I saw with the promo trailer.

You've got it now, i personally don't think its necessary because im still very much learning the craft as well and i don't want to give my self the extra stress of worrying if the footage is in focus or not especially if im making a film that some one has invested in. I'm not saying don't use one, there are many that do and if done right it looks great, im just saying its something to think about.

You're right the follow focus isn't that important and to be honest iv only used it once, what i will say for it though is when you have an HD100 or in your case HD200 with mattebox rails and follow focus it is very impressive to look at and that is IMO an important factor, your actors and crew will feel better if they are working with professional looking equipment especiall if they're not getting paid..

As long as you have a camera, tripod, audio equipment and an edit suit you can make a film. If you want shots like in my promo you'll need a crane and dolly, if you read my shadow land thread you'll see there is a lot you can make your self.

My web site is www.camerashy.org.uk but it is seriously out of date, the guy who updates it is in thailand at the moment and won't be back for a while. I intend on getting a website made specifically for shadow land, i have a web designer that owes me a favour.

Andy.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 03:20 PM   #78
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Hey Andy, I have been working like crazy this week and haven't been able to get to the computer lately. I came down with a cold the other day too. No fun at all...

I think for now I will just stick with the stock 16x lens and worry about adapters once I get a good hold on this stuff. I would still like to get a good matte box. The one you suggested/bought looks pretty reasonable and you liked it, so thats good enough for me. But filters....what did you end up getting?

For audio I was looking at the A/T 897. B&H has a pretty good kit...what do you think? http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...icrophone.html

Editing suit - Final Cut Pro on the Mac

Tripod - I honestly have no clue. Every tripod I look at looks flemsy and the head looks like it will hardly hold the camera.

I have plans drawn to build my own Steadicam but I don't have the proper dimensions.

I have already built my own crane and dolly just sitting and waiting to be used.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 08:23 PM   #79
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Hey Terry, Yeah i don't think you'll be disappointed with that matte box, i was over the moon with it. As for filters i'v not actually bought any for it, i use it mainly for controling the light that goes into the lens, if i was going to buy a filter it would be a polarizing filter which just cuts out reflections in glass. i wouldn't use any coloured filters cause you can do that in final cut studio and its non destructive.

The mic kit looks good to me, never used it before but audio technica are a decent make and the price seems about right.

Remember and buy final cut studio 2, i know its expensive but you need the full workflow from capture to dvd.

For a tripod i use a manfrotto http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...HDV_3284_.html the 501 head is a good head although with the hd100 fully loaded its at the limit of its weight capabillities and the alternative is a bigger system which can cost up to £3000, i used a 503 once and didn't like it as much.

By all means give it a go with building a steadicam but its a very complicated bit of equipment and there are some reasonably priced systems out there like the glidecam smooth shooter.

Andy.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 11:41 PM   #80
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Yeah, that matte looks just as good as any one of the expensive ones... What are the little flaps inside for? I've never seen them on a matte box before..or maybe I just wasn't looking hard enough..

I currently work with PC. But I am thinking about switching to Mac..But to get a system with the performance I am needing to edit video of the caliber, it will cost me around the 2000 range.. (I think that should be like 4 grand in U.S. currency). With PC, I can build a decent machine for around $1200. So whats drawing me toward PC is that I am familiar with it and it is less expensive. What is drawing me toward Mac is FCP2 and Mac computers generally preform better not to mention a lot of feature films are edited with FCP2. So I suppose what I am afraid of is dumping money into a system that won't preform properly. I had it mind to get Sony Vegas and build my own PC. Vegas runs around $500 and the system I would build would be, like I said, around the $1200 range. I think I'm talking myself into sticking with PC, but what would you do in this situation?

The reason I chose that AT kit was because it was decently priced with a boom pole. I discussed getting a mixer before but I think I will be fine without one for now...

Also, one last thing...What is the hard drive that is built for the HD100/200? I forget the name/number. I would way rather work with a hard drive because I don't want to run time up on my camera using tape unless I want to buy a decent deck which equals more money..

Ok, time to go lay down and try to get rid of this cold. I bought the BBC Planet Earth series..I fall asleep half way through every episode, but it is absolutely amazing.
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Old June 7th, 2008, 05:24 AM   #81
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what would you do in this situation?
Iv been in that situation, i built my own pc about 5 years ago to edit a feature that i had shot and i edited it on adobe premiere pro. It crashed twice and i had to re edit the film twice! then One of the fans failed and my mother board got fried. It cost me a grand to build and within a year it was lying in my yard waiting to go to the dump.

I obviously had a bad experience with built pc's and a lot of people have very successfull experiences and id never put you off buying one but it was enough for me to leave pc's for editing forever. I bought a quadcore G5 2.5 GHz with 2gb ram, two 20" monitors and final cut studio and iv never looked back, The whole system cost me about 5.5K but worth every pennyl. Its never let me down once.

The flaps inside the matte box are just to protect the lens although i fold them back out the road and leave them there.

As for the Hard drive a company i do some work for gave me one to test and get familiar with. They are great little devices but during my testing i did find on two occasions that it skiped a few seconds of footage, it didn't happen offten enough to become a problem though. What we did find is that if you are under the preasure of a deadline we found ourselves going back to using tapes. It also adds weight to the camera. I think in a situation like filmmaking where you have time to use one they would be fantastic to work with and with HDV you don't need to worry so much about drop out or timecode breaks.

All of this is just my experiences, ultimately you'll need to decide what is the best option for you given your budget restraints.

hope the cold gets better soon.

Andy.
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Old June 7th, 2008, 05:05 PM   #82
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I bought a quadcore G5 2.5 GHz with 2gb ram, two 20" monitors and final cut studio and iv never looked back, The whole system cost me about 5.5K but worth every pennyl. Its never let me down once.
$5500? wow... that price scares me.. Eventhough I will be paying that much for the camera.. That is a hard decision to make... Final Cut Studio 2 on a Mac...or Sony Vegas on a PC.... UGH!!

I would love to just go with the Mac but I just don't know exactly what I would be benifiting by going with Mac..I mean, if it wasn't so expensive I woudn't think twice..but for my needs I think the price is a little over what I am wanting to spend.

I would like to get something like the 40G Dr-hd100 so all I have to do is just take it from my camera and plug it into my computer and just drag the footage to the time line without having to render the footage... but aparently they are discontinued??

So far with everything on my list my kit roughly costs $12,700

HD200u $5400
Matte Box (one you suggested) $500
A/t 897 $600
Tripod (based on the B&H link you sent me) $700
FCS2+MacPro $5500 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...dio_2_Mac.html)


But if we replace FCS2+MacPro with Vegas and a PC...

Vegas $500
PC $1300 including 20" monitor

Everything will equal = $9000

And neither include the hard drive...or a battery pack...

I now have a head ache...

is there any way you see that I could work with these numbers and get things cheeper and still have a fully functional kit? Maybe i'm over pricing stuff...
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Old June 7th, 2008, 05:39 PM   #83
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is there any way you see that I could work with these numbers and get things cheeper and still have a fully functional kit? Maybe i'm over pricing stuff...
im afraid not your numbers seem about right. Of course if you keep looking on ebay or other second hand options you could save money.There is also the option of hiring and borrowing the gear only when you're filming. if you just bought the essentials like tripod camera and edit suite and hire or borrow the rest when you film then you could get that number down.

btw It wasn't $5500 it was £5500, i added ram and extra monitors and a firewire 16 channel mixing desk for ADR work and a hi def TV for previewing my work (which iv yet to get working properly).

Iv built my equipment up over the years adding to it every so often when i can afford it, its the only way to do it unless your loaded which unfortunately i am not :(

Andy.
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Old June 7th, 2008, 06:16 PM   #84
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:/ crap... well I'm on my way to getting things situated where I can afford to just buy everything out right. I currently run a small car "business" where I buy cars from car auctions, fix them up and flip them for a profit. I could currently just buy everything including the Mac but it would completely shut my business down. I have to wait until I double my investments which might take awhile longer than I had anticipated as I am not as skilled in the trades of the car business as most.

so $8600 for your editing suit?? wow.. well I suppose its worth it when you have a business that actually makes money. Me on the other hand, I just have a passion to make films. I always have ever since highschool. I remember when the xl1 came out, I had a fund raiser where people would donate toward my "camera fund raiser." I actually collected over 300 bucks during my senior year. But at that time, the xl1 was around $5500 so I was no where close. I ended up going to college for Anthropology and have just recently picked back up with my old desire to make films. Hopefully my efforts this time will be successful.

Hey Andy, thanks alot for helping me with this stuff, your opinion really helps. When I sharpen down a good copy of the short script I'll send you a copy so you can tell me how horrible it is haha.

-Terry.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 04:20 AM   #85
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Hey Andy, thanks alot for helping me with this stuff, your opinion really helps. When I sharpen down a good copy of the short script I'll send you a copy so you can tell me how horrible it is haha.
Hey no problem, thats what this place is for. I remember the day before we shot our first feature in 2004 (i was 23), i was driving home from Edinburgh with my two company partners and we were all excited. That night all the cast and crew gathered on my patio for some wine and that night i knew it was gonna be a disaster.......i got a feeling in my gut. And sure enough our main location which was a woodland got chopped down by the forest commision and it rained heavily for two weeks solid. That coupled with the fact we knew nothing about feature filmmaking it all went wrong.

Just remember if your shoot goes bad its not as bad as it seems. So many mistakes we made but we came out the other end stronger for it, the film was never completed but we got some great experience about how to manage a film. The second feature was completed and with a lot less problems, we enterd it into the Edinburgh film festival but were declined.......oh well we had our own big premiere and everyone seemed to like it. Now with our promo for shadow land the production value has made leaps and bounds and its the first feature we're trying to get funding or investment on.

Be carefull if your thinking of getting investment and shooting it yourself, as i said first time filmmakers will most likely go wrong. If we had investors with our first film the stress level would have been rediculous and the fact we messed it up we would have been sitting in hot water.

The creative side is only a part of it, you need to be able to orginise locations, transport, food, lodgings, deal with problems when they happen, even quarrels with actors and still manage all your gear and stck to the schedule and all the while making sure your shots are good. Just so you know what you're up against, you can do it , you just need to be prepared which is why pre production is a very important time. Make a list of everything you need to do and tick them off when you know they have been secured, and listn to the opinions of the people around you.

I'd be happy to read your scrip when its done but you should know when it comes to scripts i always say what i think, scrip writing is no time to humour people and say its good. You need complete honesty from people reading your script or you'll get a tainted view.

Andy.
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Last edited by Andy Graham; June 8th, 2008 at 05:00 AM.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 07:23 AM   #86
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I could currently just buy everything including the Mac but it would completely shut my business down.
Yeah, don't do that.

It may not have sunk in too much yet, but I want to stress filmmaking is a collaborative business. You need other people not just for their skills, but just to make the process manageable. Don't try to do it all by yourself.

Really the only way to learn is from and with others.

Find an editor, find someone with a camera (or a DoP and operator), find some actors that are willing to help you realize the script. There will still be plenty of challenges that way.

A lot of people starting out will participate for 'credit' (and experience) with deferred salaries.

Wait with buying a camera , any gear really, until you know for a fact that it will be what you need.

George/
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Old June 8th, 2008, 09:53 AM   #87
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Wait with buying a camera , any gear really, until you know for a fact that it will be what you need.
Good advice, it also means that because camera technology moves so fast by the time your ready to buy there may be new technology available to you.

Andy.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 12:28 PM   #88
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Terry, that's wierd! I'm currently in school working toward a double major in Anthropology and Film Studies with a production emphasis. Our first feature was fraught with difficulties as well, still not done editing (I'm thinking of starting the edit from scratch - ick). You don't need a top of the line machine for editing, I'm running with a dual 2.0Ghz G5 and it edits HDV just fine. Just puts tons of RAM and tons of Disk space.

I used to edit on a Performa 475 (definitely not DV)... You'll always get lots of responses from people giving ideal setups for editing, the truth is that you can halve that budget for the hardware and be really happy with what you get! I started the edit of the feature on a dual 1.42 Ghz G4 with an older version of Final Cut Pro.

Stop thinking ideals and start thinking what will get the job done within your budget.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 01:02 PM   #89
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The creative side is only a part of it, you need to be able to orginise locations, transport, food, lodgings, deal with problems when they happen, even quarrels with actors and still manage all your gear and stck to the schedule and all the while making sure your shots are good. Just so you know what you're up against, you can do it , you just need to be prepared which is why pre production is a very important time. Make a list of everything you need to do and tick them off when you know they have been secured, and listn to the opinions of the people around you.
This is true....But it seams that I cannot get anyone supporting me to understand this. They still think they can just shoot a movie by themselves without organization. Every time I say "well we need a script" ..one of my friends goes "we don't need a script, just have fun and it will all come to you.." needless to say he still lives in candy land with the keebler elves if he thinks life is just that easy. That might be fine when you are just shooting home movies in your back yard...but he tries to apply that same logic when we go to the movies. We seen "Hot Rod" awhile back and he always uses that as an example..."see they just had fun and their movie was awesome!" And when I try to tell him otherwise, he argues with me like hes been in the field for 20 years. He expects when I get this equipment that I'm just gonna hand it to him and go "have fun!" all I have to say to that is "HAHAHAHAHA"

When I say I'm alone with this stuff, I mean mentally haha...

Quote:
I'd be happy to read your scrip when its done but you should know when it comes to scripts i always say what i think, scrip writing is no time to humour people and say its good. You need complete honesty from people reading your script or you'll get a tainted view.
That would be great...I need constructive criticism, or atleast honest criticism.
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Old June 8th, 2008, 01:07 PM   #90
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Terry, that's wierd! I'm currently in school working toward a double major in Anthropology and Film Studies with a production emphasis. Our first feature was fraught with difficulties as well, still not done editing (I'm thinking of starting the edit from scratch - ick). You don't need a top of the line machine for editing, I'm running with a dual 2.0Ghz G5 and it edits HDV just fine. Just puts tons of RAM and tons of Disk space.

I used to edit on a Performa 475 (definitely not DV)... You'll always get lots of responses from people giving ideal setups for editing, the truth is that you can halve that budget for the hardware and be really happy with what you get! I started the edit of the feature on a dual 1.42 Ghz G4 with an older version of Final Cut Pro.

Stop thinking ideals and start thinking what will get the job done within your budget.

How far along are you with your degree? What in particular do you find interesting in Anthropology?


What do you suggest in terms of a Mac machine? Something that isn't too expensive and will run just fine while editing HDV..? I honestly have never used a Mac..the only time I ever touched one was to check my email on a friends Mac book...
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