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Old March 10th, 2009, 08:04 AM   #1
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Mics for Video Deposition ??

Any Suggestions I need a few cheaper

I found these...any suggestions

http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/...uctId=11029211

Nady CBM 40X Boundary Microphone and more Specialty Microphones at GuitarCenter.com.
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Old March 10th, 2009, 02:52 PM   #2
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Randy,

The link to the Sony site doesn't work, and I didn't even try to go to the Nady site because I know Nady makes cheap stuff.

You can get by at a video deposition with something along the lines of the Audio-Technica ATR-35 mics that sell for around $40 or so each at music stores. I used them in the early years and they sucked less than the Radio Shack lavs that many people were using. If you are doing many depositions, though, I would highly recommend something with better sound quality and durability. I always view depositions as an audio job with a little bit of video work. The audio quality is actually more important than the video quality. Any of the good lavaliers you will see recommended for video field work will do - the Trams, Sanken COS11, Sennheiser MKE-2, etc. Then you can also use those when you need to for regular production. However, I preferred using Audio-Technica AT803 mics. I didn't want to take a chance with my good Trams for a depo. The 803s are very sturdy, which is helpful when attorneys suddenly jump up from the table at a break without unhooking from the mic. They are not as small as some of the aforementioned products, but that's really not an issue for depositions. Something like the Sony ECM55 would fit the bill as well. You can find fairly decent deals on both of those on a popular internet auction site.

I assume you already have a mixer? If not, I would recommend either a Sound Devices model if you want to also use it in the field, or a Mackie 1202 or 1402 if you are dedicating it to your depo package. The Shure M367 also seems to be popular in the legal world.

Hope this helps. Have fun!

Rob

Rob Neidig, Certified Legal Video Specialist
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Old March 10th, 2009, 02:57 PM   #3
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Randy,

I did actually go to the Nady site after writing my first reply. A boundary mic is really only useful at a depo as a backup mic. That is to use in the case one of your other mics has a problem, at least the boundary mic will capture audio for the few seconds until you can interrupt the proceedings and get a good mic back on the person whose mic quit. The boundary mic will also pick up the court reporter when he/she swears the witness, etc. But you also need the witness and each attorney fitted with a lavalier mic.

As far as that particular mic goes, I don't have actual experience with it, but Nady specializes in cheap stuff. It might be acceptable for your use, but I would also look into Crown PCMs as you grow.

Rob
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Old March 10th, 2009, 05:22 PM   #4
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I ordered two of these MXL FR-401 Supercardioid Boundary Microphone at Academic Superstore

they are polar super Cardioid and will pick up less of the room. I was trying to stay away from lapel / lavalier mics ....Not wanting to have to mic up the person being deposed I did order these also just to have on board MXL MXL FR-355K Lavalier Interview Microphone Kit at Academic Superstore
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Old March 11th, 2009, 11:48 AM   #5
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Randy,

Unfortunately your audio is not going to be very good. Boundary mics are designed to pick up a wide area, but therefore compromise the overall sound quality by not getting great sound on any one person. Plus it's likely an attorney will plop down his big stack of papers right on top of your mic since it will have to be on the table in front of him. You absolutely should mic up the deponent as well as the attorney asking the questions and the attorneys likely to be objecting. That's your job as the video deposition videographer. If the attorney that hired you cannot understand the questions or answers on your tape/DVD, then you will not be hired again.

Hope all comes out o.k.

Rob
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