The art of framing. - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Open DV Discussion
For topics which don't fit into any of the other categories.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 16th, 2004, 12:40 PM   #16
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
Not sure I understand your question, Alfred...

In my example, right and left can be interchanged. It's more about which direction the hero is facing relative to where he is in the frame (in the example given, we are "short-siding" him).
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 01:31 PM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London
Posts: 423
Keith wrote "These are the rules I remember:

The hero always comes from the left of the frame and the villain from the right."

It was this I was commenting.. your post, Charles, made perfect sense to me!
Thanks.
Soon to wite your 1500 post.. (better make it special:-)
Alfred Okocha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 02:29 PM   #18
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
yeah, but who's counting?

Sorry, I missed Keith's post somehow--weird.

Regarding having single figures in the frame not being centered: yes, normally. On "American History X", the director insisted that I center-punch to such a degree that he would call for another take if the crosshairs were not between the eyes. I wish I were joking, but I'm not. Never really figured out what he was going after with that. I think he read somewhere that Kubrick was fond of this and decided to make it a law.
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 02:34 PM   #19
Air China Pilot
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 2,389
<<<-- Originally posted by Alfred Okocha : "the hero from the left... villain from the right.."

When they are introduced? Is that right?
Never thought of it.. -->>>

I just read that somewhere but when you think about it, for some reason it always seems to be the case. This is especially so in fighting movies.

I think perhaps part of the reason is that side scrolling games were like this. But then maybe they themselves were influenced by film.

Think of western gunfights.
__________________
--
Visit http://www.KeithLoh.com | stuff about living in Vancouver | My Flickr photo gallery
Keith Loh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 02:54 PM   #20
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London
Posts: 423
I really enjoyed American history X!
Edward Norton at his very best. Can't remember any odd framing.. I better pick it up again to see what you mean. :-)

I can remember nice light though! Was it you?
Alfred Okocha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 04:13 PM   #21
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 3,840
A good book on composition, framing and storyboarding (which is the art of "framing a film" on paper)

Setting Up Your Shots
by Jeremy Vineyard, Illustrated by Jose Cruz
Richard Alvarez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2004, 07:12 PM   #22
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
<<I can remember nice light though! Was it you?>>

No, I did some second unit shooting which didn't end up in the film. The director, Tony Kaye, was also the DP and operator (although I got the credit). The film was shot largely unlit and mostly handheld, sort of like a low budget DV shoot yet on 35mm and with a full crew standing around!

The weird thing about his insisting on how I frame was that I noticed when the movie came out that he didn't hold himself to the same criteria. He was an odd duck. The stories surrounding Tony and his theatrical nature are now Hollywood legend.
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 02:37 AM   #23
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London
Posts: 423
Tony Kaye.. I can't remember I've seen anything else by him.. What has he done?

"He was an odd duck." Has he passes away?

Thanks.
Alfred Okocha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 02:57 AM   #24
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Los Angeles, Ca USA
Posts: 542
Rules, Rules, Rules.

The one about the eyes is one of the most important rules. My rule about the eyes is the eyes need to stay above the bottom 50% of the screen. That would be a guideline. If they person being interviewed has a birdnest in their hair then you probably break the rule.

One of my favorites is don't let the person being interviewed nose extend out farther than the more distant cheek unless you are doing a profile.

Always wear headphones.

Use a tripod with a ball socket center column.

Make sure you have balanced your camera on the tripod to the point where you can let go of the camera handle and the camera won't dip forward or backwards.

Check for white specks on your clients who are dressed in dark suits BEFORE you put them on camera.

People being interviewed should not be chewing gum unless it matches the mood of the piece.

Use Zebras!

Lower your camera & tripod if you have to leave it unattended. Don't leave your camera & tripod unattended.

If you are using an external television monitor for a live event always place the monitor in peripheral view so you can instantly see what is actually going on on stage without having to turn your head.

When framing an active performer, take into account if they stretch their arms and try to anticipate those stretches.

Cue cards don't work as well as telemprompters. Teleprompter services are not that expensive.

If you don't have a make up person, at least bring one powder puff for each person to be interviewed and some fleshtone powder.

Listen and disable if possible air conditioners. RADIO'S, refrigerators etc.

Remember to put everything back the way it was when you are done.
Alessandro Machi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 03:34 AM   #25
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: HB, CA - USA
Posts: 298
REMOVE the Lens Cap.

Charge your batteries.

Make sure the time code is rolling and you are recording.
Aaron Rosen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 03:40 AM   #26
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Seattle , WA
Posts: 184
The Tony Kaye subject probably deserves it's own topic, but basically what I've heard/read is that on American History X his cut of the movie was much shorter and faster paced. But the studio recut it into what was released, Tony fought against losing creative control of the project, tried to get his directing credit replaced with "Alan Smithee", which didn't happen and he's been trying to fight Hollywood ever since and hasn't directed another movie there yet. IMDB lists "Snowblind" as being another movie he directed in 2002 but no information besides a brief plot and the screenwriter are listed.

Here's a site with some info

Don't know how much of what I related is correct, just what I've gathered from what I've read about him. Hopefully Charles P. will have some insight on the subject!

Cheers,
Brian
Brian Huey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 07:27 AM   #27
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London
Posts: 423
Thanks for your many pointers. very noteworthy.

ON the subject of Tony Kaye I found this interview with him.

http://www.fadeinmag.com/kaye/interview1.html

More or less what Brian's stated.. He seems to be a character alright.. or a "odd duck". ;-)
Alfred Okocha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 07:57 AM   #28
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Quebec, QC, Canada
Posts: 123
Here's a link to a useful website:

http://www.jamesarnett.com/sections.html#anchor130335

Go to the Production section and click Camera Works and Composition.

Also look at the "Cross the Line" interactive demo section at the top of the index page...
Lots of info about all aspects of film making or video.

Have fun!
__________________
Norm :)
Norm Couture is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 08:16 AM   #29
RED Code Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Holland
Posts: 12,514
Tony's IMDB link for more info on his "films"
__________________

Rob Lohman, visuar@iname.com
DV Info Wrangler & RED Code Chef

Join the DV Challenge | Lady X

Search DVinfo.net for quick answers | Buy from the best: DVinfo.net sponsors
Rob Lohman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2004, 12:10 PM   #30
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
mmm, don't want to hijack this thread further but as I recall, Tony's application for "Alan Smithee" status was rejected because part of the extensive set of criteria for that designation is that the director does not publicly denigrate the film, the producers or the studio. Tony did all of that. He actually wanted his credit to read: "Directed by Humpty Dumpty".

And he is still alive and making commercials, as he always has.
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:01 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network