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Old November 14th, 2008, 05:35 PM   #1576
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Personally, I'd go for the V1U over the Z1 as it is a newer camera, the Z1 is a workhorse alright (favourite of film schools) but is getting long in the tooth - hence it has at least a couple of replacements out (see Z7).

What are your uses for the camera?

Oh, and don't go hard-drive based. I know you can get an official sony add-on for the V1, but as I recall it has some serious reliability issues. Stick with tape. Solid State cameras are getting better but still a no-go if you're doing event videography without a data wrangler or space on your HDD is at a premium.
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Old November 18th, 2008, 10:09 AM   #1577
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Hi all. Lots of interesting reading, lots of people in different places.

So here's my situation:

I'm in film school, so I have access to a wide range of lighting equipment, tripods, and sound equipment, but no digital cameras.

I plan on filming a few narratives this summer (I'm planning ahead), but would like to get a camera in March/April to run it through the tests. I would like the final distribution to be festivals, but that's more of a pipe dream than anything.

My budget is in the $3000-$4000 range. Originally I was looking at some of the ProHD cameras from JVC, but the 16x lens seemed to have a lot of breathing and CA problems, and buying the 17x put me out of budget. I'm playing with the idea of a 35mm adapter, but I feel like I don't necessarily need the DoF. The 2/3" Scarlet looks great, but it won't get to me in time, and will also probably be out of my range, though on my radar for the future.

Thanks everyone.
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Old December 29th, 2008, 06:06 PM   #1578
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The JVC HD100 has not gotten much play. Its footage is just as goos as the HVX but half its price when you find a used one.
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Old January 14th, 2009, 07:47 PM   #1579
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For my first prosumer camera, I'm bombarded with a TON of options, but I'd like to have something that can emulate a more cinematic feel, rather than documentary. Trying to keep to around $2000 or less, I'm hit with a few options.

The Canon XL2... It's a bit over though, but it's got that 16:9, something like 24p, and long lens which might get me some DoF?

Theres the Panasonic DVX100b, which I also hear good things about. Anamorphic 16:9 mode, right? I think it's around the same price?

And then there's the Canon HV40, coming out soon. About $1000, plus 35mm adapter and 50mm lens, that'd run to $2000, and give me that 16:9 and 24p film look. But is it better quality than the others?

I really just want to get a camera, and stick with it. But it's hard not to flip flop when there's so many options!

Thanks for any insight!
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Old January 14th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #1580
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Lovejoy View Post
Hi all. Lots of interesting reading, lots of people in different places.

So here's my situation:

I'm in film school, so I have access to a wide range of lighting equipment, tripods, and sound equipment, but no digital cameras.


My budget is in the $3000-$4000 range. Originally I was looking at some of the ProHD cameras from JVC, but the 16x lens seemed to have a lot of breathing and CA problems, and buying the 17x put me out of budget.

Thanks everyone.
Thats funny. Thousands of us use the JVC with stock lens to make a living and you are starting off and concerned about the CA and breathing problems? The camera works for me.
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Old January 15th, 2009, 02:20 AM   #1581
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Originally Posted by Kyle Ross View Post
The Canon XL2... It's a bit over though, but it's got that 16:9, something like 24p, and long lens which might get me some DoF?Theres the Panasonic DVX100b, which I also hear good things about. Anamorphic 16:9 mode, right? I think it's around the same price?And then there's the Canon HV40, coming out soon.
Kyle - you're sure mixing and matching! An XL2 in your left hand and an HV40 in your left? An ancient 4:3 DVX100 with lossy 16:9 (don't go there) and 35 mm adapters? You need counselling :)

The XL2 will no more limit your dof than the other cams you mention as they all employ 1"/3 chips, but you can attach long focal length lenses to it. The HV40 will be scorchingly better than the other two in my view, but the 35mm adapter is no run 'n' gun plaything - have you had a look at one? Are you prepared to accept the HV40's diddy-cam manual options vs the XL2's big chunky buttons?

tom.
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Old January 15th, 2009, 01:59 PM   #1582
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Well, like a lot of people here probably did, I spent most of my childhood and teen years making short films on their parent's crappy camcorder, so I haven't really ever been able to shoot on something that gives any real DoF. I know how to do lighting, how to frame, all that fun stuff... but it's been on a pretty limited system.

But you think I'd be best served by a HV40? I've never used a camcorder with big chunky buttons, so I might not know what I'm missing (besides reading up on the specs). I thought that the 35mm adapter would compensate for the lack of more manual-oriented controls?

I mean, personally I wish there was just one camcorder out there, like some sort of old Soviet Union car, that everybody had. But when I'm hit with so many options... it's overwhelming. I'm not looking for something like the RED camera, just a stepping stone up into the more prosumer camera world, something I can work with for a few years.
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Old January 15th, 2009, 05:12 PM   #1583
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I started with Canon XM2 (GL2) 4 years ago and there are samples of my efforts at this link ... except the golden eagle clips which were taken with XL2 on a tripod from a hide

Brendan Marnell | the Internet Bird Collection

... not good quality shooting, I know, but I would not find much fault with either machine; XL2 is too heavy for more than 10 minutes run 'n gun at age 69.

Sorry, if it matters, the golden eagle clips are here ...

http://birdcinema.com/my_video.php
http://www.vimeo.com/

Last edited by Brendan Marnell; January 16th, 2009 at 04:43 AM. Reason: correct myself
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 09:01 AM   #1584
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camcorder question

Iím an amateur that likes to make low budget indie films in my spare time. I have been using the Canon XL1s, but want to get a newer updated camcorder and I'm considering upgrading to HD. I have looked at a lot of the HD prosumer camcorders, but donít want to spend that kind of money. If I get a HD handycam such as the Canon HG20 or 30, will the picture quality be comparable or better than the XL1s, and are these camcorders typically used for low budget indie films? Also, any recommendations on camcorders would be greatly appreciated.

thanks
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 09:08 AM   #1585
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Hi Rick, just about any Canon consumer HD camcorder will produce a better image than the XL1S, however I would not say that they are commonly used for low-budget indie films (usually those are within the realm of the DVX100 for standard definition, and three-chip HDV camcorders for HD, as a starting point -- but we're living in an age when you can make anything with anything, so the important thing is to start shooting no matter what camcorder you have).
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 10:19 AM   #1586
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Thanks Chris for the info. If I were to spend the money on a prosumer HD camcorder, do you think the XH A1 is will get me the best bang for the buck for a low budget indie film? Also, if I were to use a prosumer HD cam, such as the XH A1 and a handycam HD cam such as the HV20 in the same production, would the picture quality be noticeably different between the two cams? I am assuming that they would be.

thanks again
Rick
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 10:35 AM   #1587
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In very low light you'd tell them apart - in all other conditions they'll match beautifully. And if you forget to flick in the NDs on the XH, the HV will give sharper footage.
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 12:31 PM   #1588
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... do you think the XH A1 is will get me the best bang for the buck for a low budget indie film?
There's no question the XH-A1 is a stellar performer; its users love it and I don't think you can say anything bad about it.

But in terms of pure bang for the buck -- that is, most capability for least amount of $$ -- then there's nothing close to the Sony FX7. Not that the A1 isn't a better cam --- it definitely is -- but you pay a high premium for a little more ability.

Check them both out at B&H, and then you can decide if the extra features are worth $1,000 to you. Note that as a CMOS cam, the FX7 will likely match better with your HV20.
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Old January 26th, 2009, 06:22 PM   #1589
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The HV40 will be scorchingly better than the other two in my view, but the 35mm adapter is no run 'n' gun plaything - have you had a look at one? Are you prepared to accept the HV40's diddy-cam manual options vs the XL2's big chunky buttons?
What about a XH A1 versus a HV40 with a 35mm adapter? Would I be able to get better footage out of a HV40+something like the Letus35, or would the lack of 3ccd compromise the quality too much? It seems like I'd be saving $1000 and gaining good DoF, but I know there's pitfalls to having 1CMOS sensor against 3 CCDs. Would picture quality completely collapse under low light conditions? Are the two camera packages remotely in the same league?
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Old January 26th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #1590
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Sony FX-7 for my interests?

I see a lot of good reasons that the FX-7 may fit my purpose. I am asking if you pro agree.

I know little to nothing about this stuff, I know business well and am interested in making videos. So I figure if I can make some money doing something fun then I will never have to "work" another day in my life.

What I am looking to do is start out by making videos, video ads, and short news segments for the internet. I would like to also if no immediate need graduate to doing these type of things for local TV. Filming both in a small studio (will be addressed later) and outdoors.

As for the small studio, I realize this is off topic but.... What is the smallest studio one could use to achieve some of the things mentioned above? I am going to be building a new building to house some of my other businesses this spring and would like to try and build a very small studio into it.

I currently have the Adobe CS3 Master Suite as I develop websites, this kit include all the video and audio software. Is this all of the software one would need to record a little news segment and edit it for both internet and TV?

I guess as I am sort of going in blind is there any other equipment that you guys would recommend to get rolling right away.

So I guess my questions are:

1.) Would the FX-7 be a good starter camera for my needs (fits my price range)?
2.) Is there a minimum size that one should think about for a small studio?
3.) Is the Adobe software CS3 Master Suite all I will need to edit and produce my videos?
4.) Is there any other equipment you would recommend to get going right away?

Again I apologize for my video ignorance but any help would be greatly appreciated.
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