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Old October 31st, 2002, 04:50 PM   #1
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zebra bars

I have a GL2 that offers zebras. Can anyone tell me where I can get a detailed description or tutorial of the finer points of using this expoure guide?
thanks
robert
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Old October 31st, 2002, 05:00 PM   #2
 
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Robert--

Check out this link, it should be of some help to you.

http://www.greatdv.com/cameras/Zebra.htm
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Old October 31st, 2002, 06:12 PM   #3
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Nice link! Note, however, that the GL-2's zebra system offers only a low-threshold display. That is, while its display is adjustable (ex: 90IRE) it does not vanish at values above the threshold as the "70-90" setting discussed in this article does. It only vanishes when brightnesses fall below the threshold.
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Old November 1st, 2002, 08:15 AM   #4
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<<<-- Originally posted by Ken Tanaka : Nice link! Note, however, that the GL-2's zebra system offers only a low-threshold display. [...] It only vanishes when brightnesses fall below the threshold. -->>>

Is it a reasonable approach to use the (GL2) zebra to get correct facial highlights by setting the level to, say, 85 then adjusting exposure untill they dissappear, in a method similar to that described for the 100 IRE setting?

And a related question-

I keep the zebra set at 100 and generally follow the method described in the greatdv article of adjusting exposure untill they (mostly) dissapear. In order to sufficiently expose the subject in some situations, small higlights are often still zebra'ed. Is this normal/acceptable, or should I be avoiding any part of my image hitting these levels?

lyd
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Old November 1st, 2002, 08:28 AM   #5
 
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<<<-- Originally posted by lydanynom :
Is it a reasonable approach to use the (GL2) zebra to get correct facial highlights by setting the level to, say, 85 then adjusting exposure untill they dissappear, in a method similar to that described for the 100 IRE setting?

And a related question-

I keep the zebra set at 100 and generally follow the method described in the greatdv article of adjusting exposure untill they (mostly) dissapear. In order to sufficiently expose the subject in some situations, small higlights are often still zebra'ed. Is this normal/acceptable, or should I be avoiding any part of my image hitting these levels?

lyd -->>>

yes, and it is worthwhile to mention that any method you get familiar with...that gives you predictable results...is a method worthy of being used. I would suggest not bouncing around to a dozen different ways of finding exposure until you're well familiar with the results of one.
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Old November 1st, 2002, 08:40 AM   #6
 
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I second Bill's advice. I'd would add to that: Take some time and shoot some tests. Don't forget--like it or not--you must keep notes, because you won't remember the settings for each test.

Look at the footage you've shot, take note of which shot best suits YOUR taste/needs/requirements, and use that as your constant (referring to the IRE setting and use of zebra pattern).

Based on the above, I have always been able to get consistant results every time I shoot.
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Old November 1st, 2002, 08:45 AM   #7
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<<<-- Originally posted by lydanynom :
[...]
And a related question-
I keep the zebra set at 100 [...] in some situations, small higlights are often still zebra'ed. Is this normal/acceptable, or should I be avoiding any part of my image hitting these levels?-->>>

<<<-- Originally posted by Bill Ravens :
yes, and it is worthwhile to mention that any method you get familiar with...that gives you predictable results...is a method worthy of being used. I would suggest not bouncing around to a dozen different ways of finding exposure until you're well familiar with the results of one. -->>>

Bill, thanks for the response. I agree that sticking with one method is the way to go, for me, for now. I'm not clear on what your "yes" means relative to my second question (quoted again above). Would you mind clarifying?

Thanks again.

lyd
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Old November 1st, 2002, 08:50 AM   #8
 
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yes, means that setting the zebra to expose for skin tones is something done quite often by "Hollywood" videographers. I beleive the convention is to use 70IRE for the HIGHLIGHTS in caucasion skin....ie nose, forehead. A setting of 80 IRE will slightly overexpose the highlights...not really something you want to do with DV exposures. Those little areas of zebra that are "remnants" are merely indications of the contrast found in everyday scenes. The only effective way to get rid of them is to bring lighting hardware with you when you shoot and to place the lights appropriately to reduce the overall scene contrast.
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Old November 1st, 2002, 09:04 AM   #9
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<<<-- Originally posted by Bill Ravens : [...] Those little areas of zebra that are "remnants" are merely indications of the contrast found in everyday scenes. The only effective way to get rid of them is to bring lighting hardware with you when you shoot and to place the lights appropriately to reduce the overall scene contrast. -->>>

Excellent. This is the part I was unlcear on. Your response gave me a small (if silly) epiphany. Fill light! It had not occured to me before this that the purpose of fill lighting was to do anything other than lighten shadows that were too dark to show detail in the first place. The idea of adding light to already well lit areas to bring them relatively closer to the highlights then using ND or exposure adjustments is great.

The only thing that keeps me from going insane over how much I have to learn is the knowledge that I have this resource from which to learn it.

Thank you!

lyd
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