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Old January 15th, 2011, 05:36 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post
Usually the wide shots are shot after the interview, together with any reverse shots. Where they appear in the cut piece is another matter.

In the UK there seems to have developed a fashion in the wide shot of having the interview out of focus and some meaningless foreground object (like a bowl of flowers) sharp. Another is to have everything out of focus.
Yes Brian that seems to be the style on The One Show, no doubt someone did it by accident and rolled the camera whilst out of focus and hey presto we have a new style to go with the wobbly cam and the searching for focus DSLR effect ;0)
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Old January 15th, 2011, 07:37 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post
Usually the wide shots are shot after the interview, together with any reverse shots. Where they appear in the cut piece is another matter.

In the UK there seems to have developed a fashion in the wide shot of having the interview out of focus and some meaningless foreground object (like a bowl of flowers) sharp. Another is to have everything out of focus.
Good point, Brian. I was referring to where it may be placed in the edit, but didn't make that clear.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 07:48 AM   #18
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Hi John,

Our studio is currently being revised to accommodate a greenscreen, 3 cameras and switcher in order to use the switcher's virtual sets. I should have the switcher within the next 2 weeks (Tricaster XD300 and nanoFlash to record from it).

At the moment, we won't be making any news shows with an anchor like you see with local news, mainly because we don't have the people or the time to do it all.
Actually, that makes things easier for the voice over intro/establishing shots open. Just for something different in larger rooms, do you have enough lights to pull off shutting the room lights off? A little variety can keep it fun for you.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 09:28 AM   #19
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Good point, Brian. I was referring to where it may be placed in the edit, but didn't make that clear.
I don't think there are any rules as such, more what is right and works for the piece you're cutting. If there was a rigid "rule" in the use of a two shot, people would break it all the time anyway.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 01:10 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by John Kilderry View Post
Actually, that makes things easier for the voice over intro/establishing shots open. Just for something different in larger rooms, do you have enough lights to pull off shutting the room lights off? A little variety can keep it fun for you.
Currently, all I have is: 2 Diva 401s (with both 2900k & 5600k lamps), 2 Barfly 200s (with 29k & 56k lamps), 1 Dedo LEDZilla (on-camera LED fresnel), and 2 Litepanels SolaENG 3 (equal to 240w tungsten, LED fresnel).

For the police chief, the EX3 was set at f1.9, 0 db and 1080 30p. The EX1 was on Lisa and set at f1.9, -3 db and 1080 30p.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 01:20 PM   #21
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I don't think there are any rules as such, more what is right and works for the piece you're cutting. If there was a rigid "rule" in the use of a two shot, people would break it all the time anyway.
I didn't intend to imply that there were set rules. Establishing shots are traditional.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 01:50 PM   #22
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Over the years a number of ways of establishing have been developed. As long as the person, together with the required info has been previously set up in the sequence, you can cut straight into the answer without using a direct question from by the interviewer. This can be either done by the V.O. or even another interviewee posing the question.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 10:35 AM   #23
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Steve:

These actually look pretty good. For my taste, I'd like to see the backlight a little less intense, and a little more behind the subject. My preference is to not see the back/rim light hitting the side of the nose on the subject.

But sometimes it's really tough...especially with an animated interviewee.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 03:29 PM   #24
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Steve:

These actually look pretty good. For my taste, I'd like to see the backlight a little less intense, and a little more behind the subject. My preference is to not see the back/rim light hitting the side of the nose on the subject.
Yes, I agree with the light placement, but I just ran out of time and space. My main goal was having a good composition and the Bg as out of focus as possible. What you are seeing is just the Diva 401s acting as both key and rim light

To those discussing how to establish the shot and sequence: is it normal to begin with a wide shot such as this video below?

If anyone can, please comment/criticize on this video, specifically the areas that I have control over (so, not the actual content/questions). Thanks.

EDIT: video changed 1/17

Last edited by Steve Kalle; January 17th, 2011 at 01:51 AM.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 11:05 PM   #25
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Nice work Steve... You asked about the opening -- it doesn't look right to me at all. Unless you have music, gfx and/or VO covering it as part of the intro, I wouldn't use the wide shot until at least when she starts asking him the questions. We need to see her as she starts speaking - also so we can see her name key. I'm guessing you were doing one camera and the other two were locked off. For variety you could walk back and forth between cameras during the interview and mix up the shots a bit. Or just operate the camera the guest is on, and mix up the framing size a bit. You could even go for an over-the-shoulder shot once in a while -- when she starts asking a question zoom out quickly and get a wide shot. Then either zoom smoothly when he starts to talk, or crash zoom back in onto the medium framing of him just before she finished her question. Adds a little variety. Also the wide shot doesn't look quite right to me, seems like the camera needs to be tilted down and be a bit wider. Otherwise this is looking really good. I'm glad you've posted this stuff Steve it's got me thinking about how I would handle a request for this kind of interview.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 10:24 AM   #26
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The WS is kind of stuck in no-man's land: it can't really be used as a cutaway camera, because you can see both sets of lips, and it doesn't work when the talent is speaking (as in the open) because it's so far to the side.

I suppose you could set it up with the talent to do a turn to the WS camera, after her intro--but before she asks the first question--with a turn back to the interview subject. But having her continue her opening spiel on a different camera just looked a bit weird to me.

You do get extra credit for trying to work three cameras in with only one shooter, though!
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Old January 17th, 2011, 02:13 PM   #27
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Thanks guys for the comments.

FYI, I had 'nature' calling towards the end of the interview and when I came back, it was finished and my assistant had gotten that wide shot with the EX3. I then got some wide shots from the other side but those don't work because the talent are on the wrong sides of the frame. We were using only 2 cameras: an EX1 & EX3. The wide shot was done after the interview finished.

So, would that wide shot work anywhere or should I scrap it and stick with 2 camera angles?

For future reference, is it standard practice to alter the framing during this type of interview? I shot in 1080 and edit in 720 so I can make certain shots tighter such as when he is talking about Vietnam - what say you?

I have another interview this Wednesday with the fire marshal in one of the fire stations, and I hope to use the lens near full tele to get a fire truck in the shot behind the fire marshal. So, how tight can I get for this type of interview? See image below.
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Any Current or Former Broadcast News People Here-chief_framing.jpg  
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Old January 17th, 2011, 02:26 PM   #28
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Shot sizes can change, especially during a long interview. Although, I'd tend not to go tighter than a CU for most interviews, you need really intense subject matter to justify using a BCU. These are normally done during shoot, rather than in post. Just change shot size when a question is being asked and you use the interviewer shot to cover the change. This can be done using one camera, you just shoot the reversals after the interview and the reporter repeats the questions - standard broadcast stuff.

Two shots are standard fare, just go more over the shoulder rather than from the side. On a long interview you can use these shots to break up the I/V or shorten answers These can be shot after the interview.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:53 PM   #29
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If anyone can, please comment/criticize on this video, specifically the areas that I have control over (so, not the actual content/questions). Thanks.
Yes - wide shot doesn't work as is. (Though I've seen a great deal worse. :-) )

I think a big problem is the timing - you cut to it just as the reporter introduces herself, and I feel that's when we most need to be seeing just her.

It may work if you delayed the cut a few seconds to her words "Featured in this interview... (cut) ... is newly appointed etc......" She introduces him, we see him at the same time - pictures match the words.
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