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Old August 21st, 2005, 07:01 PM   #1
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education editing tv commercials

Hi,
I would like some opinions on an educational institute for my son who is interested in editing television commercials, such as putting then together animations and special effects.
Would it be to his advantage to go to a big college or a college that specilizes in graphics, animation, editing .........?
What is the job market preference these days in that area, when it comes to education?
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Old August 21st, 2005, 08:10 PM   #2
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Pretty much two things are necessary to get a job in 'the industry'. A good reel, and good connections.

The reason to go to film/art school, is to get both of those. The school should turn him out with both of those.
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Old August 21st, 2005, 08:17 PM   #3
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From talking to some editors, the path most follow is just working your way up:

(college/university)
intern/work at a post production facility (low/no pay)
assistant editor
editor

There's smaller production companies that don't have assistant editors (so that step is not there), but that's more common for corporate videos.

Quote:
Would it be to his advantage to go to a big college or a college that specilizes in graphics, animation, editing .........?
Going to university/college has some benefits:
Increases your chances of landing an entry-level position, like an internship, random job (i.e. tape op), or assistant editing position. At one facility in Toronto (Post Producers Digital), I talked to the guy there and says that lots of people with film/TV degrees apply for entry-level positions and that he gives preference people who come from Sheridan's editing program (a one-year program... I think you need some prior education to get into it).
There's other way to get an entry-level position like nepotism, or networking + luck.

A film/video degree will give you a broad education... so you learn an overview of everything, and you get the benefits of a university education if you believe in that (learn critical thinking and theory).

Going to a film/video program is good for networking, because some classmates will eventually be working in the field.

Some programs are better/more suitable than others... you'd have to do research for your area.


Higher education does cost you time+money... tuition, books, residence?, and time which could've been spent working a job. There's a lot of people in the industry who don't have film/video degrees but just got where they are by working their way up. A film/video degree is probably more useful outside the field... most people won't care that you have a degree, although it can help you land an entry-level position (of which there's lots of competition for at some places).
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 07:38 AM   #4
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College is useful for the bigger picture. Not getting a job, but preparing him to adapt to changing circumstances. Assume that whatever he learns for the job now will be meaningless in 10 years, but eductaion keeps getting used.

When I was HS age, I was interested in theater, 35mm photography, and computers. Went into computers for 20 years, then got bored around teh time of the Internet. Now I am doing video (which uses theater and photography knowledge, as well as computers). The broader your perspectives (not just job-related either) the easier life gets.
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 06:26 PM   #5
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The great thing about school is your learn how to learn.

A place that has a good reputation and alot of hands on experience so he can build up a reel would be handy
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 07:51 PM   #6
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I'm not sure what building a reel means, I am not familiar with that term.
matt, {a place that has a good reputation and alot of hands on experience so he can build up a reel would be handy}, yes, I agree that is a plus. I think the more you learn in life helps make you a more well rounded individual in life.
This is all good feedback and well appreciated. Getting a young individual off to a good start is making some tough decisions on which route to take, thanks everyone for taking the time to share your knowledge and wisdom on this matter.
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 09:23 PM   #7
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A "reel" is a demo sample of your work for prospective employers. Actors, Directors, Photographers, Editors, Effects artist, all have a 'reel' to give people to view their work.

Of course, these days it's usually a DVD instead of a reel of film, but the term remains from the old days.

It's a bit of a catch 22 as with many professions. You need a reel to get work, you need work to put on your reel... So you start off with the stuff you do for free, or stuff you might do in SCHOOL where you might have access to better equipment and forced labor (I mean that in the nicest way) to complete your projects.

Connections are just that. IF you are not in school, you go looking for people connected in the industry, volunteer to work as an assistant or PA (Production Assistant). Chop wood, carry water. Work your way up.

Picking a school is a matter of chosing the best facilities (equipment/studio) Teachers (real world experience? Credentials?) and CONNECTIONS (Where do the graduates go? Who do you have a chance to work with at the school?)
All under the limitations of what you can afford/whether you might be accepted.

There are pros and cons to the school/non-school route. A search will reveal long discussions from many of us who have worked professionally without a degree... and some who have started in school... and some who have GONE BACK to school after working professionally. (Don't laugh, Spielberg went back to get his Bachelors a couple of years ago... to fulfill a promise to his folks)

L.O.A.F.S Library of Annotated Film Schools, I think is still online. Read it with a grain of salt. Lots of Hyperbole and Sour Grapes... but an interesting read.
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Old August 22nd, 2005, 10:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Alvarez
and some who have GONE BACK to school after working professionally. (Don't laugh, Spielberg went back to get his Bachelors a couple of years ago... to fulfill a promise to his folks)
Why would anyone laugh? Going to school is useful. I come to school here and at DVXuser every day. I read 1-3 books a week, 5 video mags a month, and I try to take on new challenges when I can. You are either growing or dying. In fact, I think that is going to be my new sig for a while.

I trust Spielberg didn't take too many film courses though. Probably literature and accounting. Maybe cosmology (not cosmetology, look it up) :)
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Old August 23rd, 2005, 04:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Tamayo
Hi,
I would like some opinions on an educational institute for my son who is interested in editing television commercials, such as putting then together animations and special effects.
i'd first look at the jr. college options in your area, you typically can't beat the bang for the buck you get with that.

i think that a lot of the heavy-duty animation work being done today is done overseas, because the labor is so much cheaper... but you should still have to start out with the basic editing theory, lighting, and such that you can get in j.c. teleproduction classes... no sense in paying top $$$ to learn stuff you can get for cheap elsewhere.

also plan on spending time serving as a free intern at a company somewhere.
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