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Old November 30th, 2012, 02:11 PM   #16
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Re: for all of the professionals

from speaking to a friend who did a communication degree, I can be able to get a job maybe at local tv station or a sport stadium like Houston Rockets, Dynamo, and Astros. I will have to work my way up, but I think it's worth it in the end. And if worse comes to worse, I'll just go back to school for my nursing degree. I rather try to give it all I got to get it out of my system than regret it later on in life.
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Old December 2nd, 2012, 12:33 AM   #17
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Re: for all of the professionals

Victor - at this point I'd suggest to really do your research. Part of it you're doing right now by posting your questions here and that's good but don't stop here.

Didn't your High School give you an/some aptitude test(s)? What did they indicate? If not, since you're talking about your life here, I'd suggest signing up for a/some private test(s) and they're available.

One saying (don't remember the exact words but it goes something like this): When it comes time to kick the bucket, you're regret the things you didn't do more than the ones you did. That may apply more for smaller things than a career, but it still a good thought.

Prepare a list of your top career interests, say the top five. Factor in the aptitude test results. Consult with your school counselor to see if you're on the right track and ask for input. Do more research.

Comment:
In high school, early years, I wanted to be an astronomer. My career research showed that at the time there were only 6, yes, 6! professional astronomers in the entire country. Hmmm... scratched that career off my list.

In college I explored various courses - accounting (CPA?), chemistry, and finally went into engineering.

When I graduated from college I met one of my high school alumni classmates who was also graduating. He majored in music and played trumpet really, really good. However, upon graduation he couldn't find a job. Granted, the job market wasn't the best but he was flabbergasted and dejected. For myself, I had five interviews and five good offers. The lesson here is to investigate career opportunities, the probability of getting employment (or being self-employed) and the income therefrom.

All is not gold that glitters. In spite of what seemed like my good fortune upon graduation, the job offer I accepted didn't turn out to be the best one. Beware of Army, Navy, and ... job recruiters!

In spite of not selecting some form of art-related career, I did use my interest and art abilities all through college and in my career so it can work well together. What ever you learn can be useful.

Nursing career? Maybe preparing videos (if it's video you're interested in) about nursing procedures? Communications would be helpful in any career you choose. Nursing could put the food on the table and the other areas of interest could make it even better. Major in one thing and take electives to support your other interests. In college, it doesn't have to be all one or the other but it does have to be mostly one and some of the other.

An after thought: my psychology prof said that everybody should have TWO careers in life. I always thought about my second one, the proprietor of a topless bar, would be interesting but, unfortunately, I'm quite sure my wife wouldn't have approved of that. Be realistic with yourself.

Disclaimer: I'm a hobbyest (ex photographer now videographer.)
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Old December 2nd, 2012, 04:15 AM   #18
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Re: for all of the professionals

I think, despite having had a sidestep to become an educationalist for ten years, that there is a case for having a proper job where promotion and salary are structured as opposed to a job in media - either for yourself or working as an employee. If you LOVE video - then as an extra it can be fun and be really interesting. As a living it's less exciting - as an employee you often have very very dull work to do - and as there are so many media graduates, somebody will always undercut you in the job market. People who ten years ago trained as 'proper' cameramen are now outed in favour of a production assistant with a camera from the local store. `Even steadicam ops with their own kit are often unemployed as less talented people move in. There are way too many people coming into a business that is contracting and changing. Same thing with performing arts and music. Talent is no longer a prerequisite. In nursing - good people have careers for life - not sure if it's the same over your side, but good nurses seem to be in demand. You can train again for specialisms and even age isn't important - older nurses are just as employable as the medical industry is so huge. I can no longer hand hold a camera for hours - bits of me ache where they didn't use to.

There will alwyas be video hobbyists - you never get that in medicine.

Despite my love for the industry, I think a real job could well be better. My own son has followed me and works with me often - but he can't get a mortgage, can hardly afford to run his car and I can't see it getting better.
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Old December 2nd, 2012, 04:32 AM   #19
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Re: for all of the professionals

Well, I'm really thankful for all the tips. It's funny, most parents want their kids to have a stable jobs and career. Not my parents. They know my passions was in film and they wouldn't let me pursue nursing until I prove to them that I have the same passion for nursing as I did for filming. I know it's risky, but I just gotta have to try it. I will report back to this thread six years from now if I was successful or not. Until then, wish me good luck.
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Old December 5th, 2012, 08:48 AM   #20
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Re: for all of the professionals

Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Nguyen View Post
from speaking to a friend who did a communication degree, I can be able to get a job maybe at local tv station or a sport stadium like Houston Rockets, Dynamo, and Astros. I will have to work my way up, but I think it's worth it in the end. And if worse comes to worse, I'll just go back to school for my nursing degree. I rather try to give it all I got to get it out of my system than regret it later on in life.
The blunt reality of this is that local TV stations have been cutting jobs and laying off personal, and pay very low wages. There are a very limited number of sports stadiums in the US and associated communications jobs available. To me if my only two choices were a radio/TV communications degree or Nursing, then Nursing would be a no brainer since there will always be healthcare related jobs available. My niece just finished nursing school and was instantly hired by a hospital. Where as most of the youngsters who have graduated from the local university's radio/TV/film program are looking for jobs and still living at their parents home.

If going to college I always advise to get something you can apply to any field to help secure a job, like a business degree as a base, and then add from there. But as others have said, never stop learning!

Good Luck!

Dave
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Old December 5th, 2012, 01:22 PM   #21
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Re: for all of the professionals

Victor,
Here's my 2 cents FWIW:

I had a decent-to-good (private) high school education and ended up working "in a cubicle" for a Fortune 100 company for nearly 30 yrs before getting downsized. In hindsight, one important thing I learned from that experience:
- make use of all the benefits an employer offers, particularly tuition reimbursement. I didn't, and ended up using part of a decent-to-generous severance package to finally get a degree...a BA - cum laud - in Communication Studies at age 54. (At that point in my life, college was a cake-walk compared to my job responsibilities).

I don't consider myself among the likes of the "real" video pros that frequent this forum, but more along the lines of a "pro" in the sense that I do what I do for money, and customers keep coming back to me, so I like to think I'm doing a decent-to-good job, though I'm always looking for new opportunities.

Degree requirements included a taste of almost everything related to communications: writing, Public Speaking (I won 1st Place in a scholarship competition my "senior" year), speech writing, graphics development, PowerPoint development, working in a multi-cultural and two-gender world, reading/understanding body language, video editing, philosophy, persuasion, and more. (I've always been interested in video production, even though my corporate career involved designing and maintaining mainframe computer systems for my employer's financials).

My point is that, at least in my experience, a "Communications" degree can open up doors to jobs that many people might not think of, e.g. on-screen/on-camera work, demonstrator, voice-over (VO) work, PR spokesperson, speech-writer, meeting facilitator, corporate instructor, salesperson, script-writer, print editor, video editor, director, and many, many more. (After graduating, I did briefly train with a VO teacher. Some jobs are even for "internal" communications only, particularly in larger or very-public companies. It could also help hone skills for getting into politics, or as a consultant to public figures so they know how to "act" or respond in public. (Many public figures hire consultants to teach them how to "carry" themselves in public).

I'm now a freelancer primarily doing non-wedding event video and promotional web spots, with occasional VO work, re-writing of product info for web sites, and even appearing on-camera once in a blue moon. However, as a freelancer, there is still no steady paycheck (except for a part-time job at a local retail outlet of one of the "big-box" stores); I spend more time looking for work than I spend doing work.

Last thought: I've always told our son and daughter that if they were going to try or do something "out of the ordinary" such as take a big trip, start a business, etc., do it while you're young, strong, and presumably in good health before you have the responsibilities of a family, mortgage, and aging parents. It just gets harder to do once you're facing those responsibilities.

Food for thought, I hope.

Best of luck.
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