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Old August 18th, 2016, 08:20 PM   #106
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Blackhurst View Post
Michael -
Auto will only get you so far, but most cameras will do "OK" to get you started (aside from 4K shooting, where manual is a must, IMO).

Chris is spot on about framing and composition, which basically means how you get your camera pointed in such a way as to get an "interesting" shot. You can just go around and shoot "stuff" and see how it looks. I've noticed some people have a natural "eye" for it, others, not so much, but with training they can get good results, others, well, their skills must lie elsewhere...

As I mentioned in my earlier post, learn what shutter speed, iris, and gain mean to how your video will look (especially shutter speed with 4K that is typically 30FPS rather than 60). While you can let the camera handle these things, it's better to know how to take control when needed.

White balance should be on that list, along with some study of color correction and various "looks", as those "effects" can be used to enhance the final product. You hopefully will get decent looking "video" results out of most cameras, but to get a professional finished look can be a whole other layer of fine tuning.

Usually it's easy enough to find the "on" button or flip out the LCD, and figure out to hit the "red button", the things above will get you moving in the right direction after that. Keep in mind that editing what he shoots will help him refine his camera skills, and is a good part of what you'll be doing. Not sure if your son is comfortable with computers, but it will help a lot if he is, and he can get into the editing.


We all have to start somewhere, most times with whatever cheap camera we can afford, and work up from there - the skills will translate even if the menus and buttons move (and that's frustrating to us too sometimes!).



As far as monetizing, that's a whole other layer of the onion. You'll find discussions here about various video "jobs", and business models. Especially today, a job or business model that works one day may not work next month, and one that seemed silly last year might be the next big thing with the right twist of technology and social media.

Worst case, it will probably be good for your son to build a set of new skills, even if they don't turn into the big bucks... if he enjoys it, it will be something he will always have with him for his personal enjoyment - the memories of you working together, as the commercial goes, are "priceless". As I mentioned before, don't push it too hard, let it come to him naturally, burnout is always a risk even with something that can be as much fun as creating something "cool"...
Dave

Thank you for the reply and all the information it contained. Thanks to you, Chris and others, I can now begin to organize and fill in my lesson plan(s).

Mackenzie loves working on the computer. I think I will try with editing what he shoots for practice, it just might be another reinforcer, and as you say, a learning tool as well.

On your last point, I will do the best that I can. The key is to never make it aversive, which means as much as possible make it fun, with plenty of breaks. I am pretty sure I will be buying an external monitor, as I think it will greatly enhance things, and most importantly make it "easier" for Mackenzie.

Once again, thank you very much.


Michael
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Old August 18th, 2016, 08:32 PM   #107
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

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Actually no, they are not. I greatly appreciate that you have chosen to hold this conversation on DVi.

I did not mean to sound curt with my short reply of just "framing and composition." My point I guess is that it all starts from there, and I had no time then (nor now it seems) to go into a treatise on the subject. But that is indeed where you begin. Put the camcorder in Auto mode and concentrate first and foremost on framing and composition. Eventually you can graduate to gradually taking manual control of the camera settings, but save that until after the basics of framing and composition have been learned through doing. Hope this helps!
Chris

Thank you for the reply. I will most certainly follow this advice. As short as it has so far been, I have greatly enjoyed my time here, and the new friends I have found. We are just at the beginning of the beginning of this journey, and if you will have us, we will take you every step of the way

As I said in my opening post, besides what I am doing for Mackenzie, I hope this process, can in some way, be useful to others with challenges, to serve as an example, an inspiration, a guide, whatever they need it to be.

Thank you again !

Michael
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Old August 18th, 2016, 08:46 PM   #108
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

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Originally Posted by Ed Roo View Post
Michael, one thing you haven't mentioned... Is MacKenzie a visual learner or an aural learner?

It will make a difference in how you try to teach MacKenzie the things he needs to learn.

Another teaching tool are podcasts. There are hundreds if not thousands of podcasts on every subject related to audio/video pre/post production and everything in between.

Everyone from manufacturers to professionals, and amateurs to semi-professionals has produced an audio or video podcast on any topic you are interested in.

There are also free university courses available through iTunes U. These courses include syllabi and reference materials. Some even include material in pdf format.
Ed

Thanks again for the reply ! Mackenzie is a very strong visual learner.

You have supplied me with some great information, and I greatly appreciate it ! I have encountered some of what you have said here, but just had not internalized how large a volume of material there was.

Thank you again.

Michael
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Old August 19th, 2016, 12:44 AM   #109
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

There are filmmakers on the Autism spectrum.

https://www.autismspeaks.org/blog/20...over-filmmaker

Autism Doesn't Hold Back Filmmaker

The Red Carpet: Documentary about an autistic filmmaker - Wrong Planet
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Old August 19th, 2016, 02:48 PM   #110
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Model Trucks.....As soon as you get a camera get some large large toy trucks for training purposes. You can train with them right in your home and Mackenzie will be learning while being engaged with his favorite and target subject. Get some that move. He can learn angles while they are still. Moving subjects present a whole new dimension in shooting video. A rolling toy will be great training. Don't assume it will be easy, its not, but you will be able to control that and introduce the motion slowly to keep it fun for him.

Kind Regards,

Steve
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Old August 19th, 2016, 03:58 PM   #111
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Regarding moving objects, there are generally two approaches: 1) lock down the camera so that the moving object comes into/out of/traverses the space, or 2) track the object.

The challenge with the locked down approach is that one needs to envision where the object will move and frame the shot with that in mind. The challenge with a tracking shot is that it takes good equipment and physical skill. If you will do tracking shots, it's really critical to get a good tripod. The Sachtler Ace and Vinten Blue are good choices. They might seem terribly high priced for three sticks and a head, but if you do your research, you'll find that they are entry level for professional work. (That said, there may be some cheaper tripods out there that happen to be solid with smooth movement. But don't be surprised when the $300 tripod with great reviews delivers shaky shots.) In general, the tighter the shot, the more critical the tripod. If you are a good distance from a construction site and are zooming into a single vehicle, don't be surprised if you need to spend more on the tripod than the camera.

Regarding Stephen's suggestion of model trucks, note that the camera will need macro capabilities if the models are especially small. You might be better off with Tonka than Matchbox. :)
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Old August 19th, 2016, 09:09 PM   #112
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism


Brian

Thank you for the reply. That is some really great information. Nice to see what is possible.

Thanks,

Michael
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Old August 19th, 2016, 09:12 PM   #113
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Digges View Post
Model Trucks.....As soon as you get a camera get some large large toy trucks for training purposes. You can train with them right in your home and Mackenzie will be learning while being engaged with his favorite and target subject. Get some that move. He can learn angles while they are still. Moving subjects present a whole new dimension in shooting video. A rolling toy will be great training. Don't assume it will be easy, its not, but you will be able to control that and introduce the motion slowly to keep it fun for him.

Kind Regards,

Steve
Steve

What a great reply ! In a million years, I would not have thought of that.

Thank you very much !

Michael
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Old August 19th, 2016, 09:24 PM   #114
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Fairhurst View Post
Regarding moving objects, there are generally two approaches: 1) lock down the camera so that the moving object comes into/out of/traverses the space, or 2) track the object.

The challenge with the locked down approach is that one needs to envision where the object will move and frame the shot with that in mind. The challenge with a tracking shot is that it takes good equipment and physical skill. If you will do tracking shots, it's really critical to get a good tripod. The Sachtler Ace and Vinten Blue are good choices. They might seem terribly high priced for three sticks and a head, but if you do your research, you'll find that they are entry level for professional work. (That said, there may be some cheaper tripods out there that happen to be solid with smooth movement. But don't be surprised when the $300 tripod with great reviews delivers shaky shots.) In general, the tighter the shot, the more critical the tripod. If you are a good distance from a construction site and are zooming into a single vehicle, don't be surprised if you need to spend more on the tripod than the camera.

Regarding Stephen's suggestion of model trucks, note that the camera will need macro capabilities if the models are especially small. You might be better off with Tonka than Matchbox. :)
Jon

Thank you for this informative post. I was going to get around to eventually asking about tripods, which is something I most assuredly need help from those that already use them.

You and Steve are thinking outside the box. Mackenzie has a few radio controlled cars that I could use, a couple are fairly large.

Thank you again !

Michael
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Old August 19th, 2016, 10:18 PM   #115
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Jon,

"Think Tonka, not Matchbox" YES, I was thinking in terms of Tonka size but had forgotten about them. What a flood of memories!!! Do they still make them, I wonder? At one time I must have owned the entire fleet. I dug many a hole in my backyard larger than my father was pleased with. Especially because I used the dump trucks to haul off the dirt so they could not be back filled!

I was the king of Matchbox and Hot Wheels. Gravity racing sport at its finest. And then high tech came around with Sizzlers, the motorized Hot Wheels. My kids don't believe it but there was life and joy for some of us kids that grew up before the internet, video games, and cell phones.

Michael, think Tonka sized toys. That is what I had in mind but Jon nailed it!

Steve
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Old August 20th, 2016, 03:22 AM   #116
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Editing is also a key aspect of film making, so a newcomer has to learn the concepts and grammar used in making films. No shot stands alone in a film (even in a single shot film, which usually consists of what amounts to shots connected together as one shot) .
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Old August 20th, 2016, 05:37 PM   #117
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Be sure to read Chris Soucy's three tripod reviews. They will provide you with the knowledge of what features and design criteria to look at and compare.

Review: Vinten Vision Blue

Review: Manfrotto 504HD/ 546GBK Video Support System

Review: Libec RS 250M Video Support System

More informaton...

Camera Support
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Old August 21st, 2016, 01:52 PM   #118
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Digges View Post
Jon,

"Think Tonka, not Matchbox" YES, I was thinking in terms of Tonka size but had forgotten about them. What a flood of memories!!! Do they still make them, I wonder? At one time I must have owned the entire fleet. I dug many a hole in my backyard larger than my father was pleased with. Especially because I used the dump trucks to haul off the dirt so they could not be back filled!

I was the king of Matchbox and Hot Wheels. Gravity racing sport at its finest. And then high tech came around with Sizzlers, the motorized Hot Wheels. My kids don't believe it but there was life and joy for some of us kids that grew up before the internet, video games, and cell phones.

Michael, think Tonka sized toys. That is what I had in mind but Jon nailed it!

Steve
Steve

Thanks ! Tonka, do they still make them? I know when I was young, they had all kinds of neat metal trucks and things. I used to use mine to excavate large portions of my yard, which of course made my parents very happy. They did not use time out in those days for correction.

Yes, it is a different world. In my youth, during the summer, my friends and I were outside all day from after breakfast until dark and sometimes after, only taking a short break to wolf down lunch and get a drink of something( typically kool-aid) every now and then.

Thanks.

Michael
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Old August 21st, 2016, 02:06 PM   #119
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

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Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post
Editing is also a key aspect of film making, so a newcomer has to learn the concepts and grammar used in making films. No shot stands alone in a film (even in a single shot film, which usually consists of what amounts to shots connected together as one shot) .
Brian

Thanks for the reply. Editing is an important objective for us. Mackenzie is well suited to spending a long time on the computer, it is just a matter of internalizing the technical skill of editing.

One thing I am anticipating, is that through his editing, I may get somewhat of an insight into how he perceives his world. I know it is not the same as all of us do. Might make for some interesting scenes.

Thank you

Michael
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Old August 21st, 2016, 02:19 PM   #120
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Re: New and need help for son with Autism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Roo View Post
Be sure to read Chris Soucy's three tripod reviews. They will provide you with the knowledge of what features and design criteria to look at and compare.

Review: Vinten Vision Blue

Review: Manfrotto 504HD/ 546GBK Video Support System

Review: Libec RS 250M Video Support System

More informaton...

Camera Support
Ed

Thank you very much for this post and the information. It does raise a couple of questions. We will be outdoors, sometimes possibly not in a level spot, should a tripod in that situation use spreaders ? What are the advantages of using spreaders as opposed to using a tripod without in an outdoor setting ?

Mackenzie is over 6'2", nearly 6'3", what would be an appropriate height for a tripod ? It is almost a certainty that I will be attaching a monitor/recorder to the camera, and he will do better if he does not have to bend over very much.

Ed, I want to thank you and everyone else who have been so very helpful here in the early stages of our quest.

Michael
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