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Old December 8th, 2002, 07:01 AM   #1
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Tips on Disco Look.

Hey peeps,

For my next project i am going back in time, back to 1978, when flares were big, hair was biggest and shoes were the biggest.

I am looking for tips of re-creating that late 70's film stock look, that was made so famous by Charlies Angels (tv series) and the Rockford Files.

My equipment consists of a Pal PD-150e (replaced my stolen xl1s) and I edit with Vegas Video and After Effects.

I have no filters at this point, is there special filters that were very popular in that period. I guess i am showing my youth, and hopefully not going to be showing anyones age here. (heh)

Any tips here, I also want to achieve that fallen off look around the corners of the frame i see so much today, it becomes darker towards the corners like the brightness is falling off (no it is not my tv) it was a common look back then.

Well anyways, Hope you guys can help

kermie
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Old December 8th, 2002, 07:50 AM   #2
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<<...back to 1978, when flares were big, hair was biggest and shoes were the biggest>>

Sounds like my high school prom photo, Kermie...complete with the heavy metal big hair, and pump shoes...PLUS white "Saturday Night Fever" three-piece linen suit with flared pants, dark silk shirt unbuttoned down to the vest, shirt collar pulled out over the suit jacket...and yes...chains (it's no wonder I've never married).

I'm not sure about filters used back then, but the things I notice most about TV and movies of that period is the visual/editing style and the music. CHV electronics and Joe's filters both have some plug-ins that can make footage look aged. Not just the dust and scratches type plug-ins, but also those that can adjust color and saturation to give it an aged look.

As for the darkened corners...that sounds like vignetting. But to be honest, I've never noticed that.

As for your sets...now that'll be tough. I remember a disco in Lubbock that had a tunnel entrance that was completely neon pink...walls, floor, and ceiling all glowing Pepto Bismol pink, then the dance floor had the lit panels...plus fog, and tons of lighting. Then you also have to consider cars, clothing (the women all wore these nylon plunging neckline short dresses and high heels...plus big hair)...how many millions do you have in your budget?
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Old December 8th, 2002, 08:24 AM   #3
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John Locke My main man,

You underestimate me!!

We have a HUGE wardrobe to work with. It sounds a little strange, but seriously what i did was my grandmother has been in an aged care home for a while because she had a major hip operation, well i told her how when she was moving i want all her furniture (she is totally getting new stuff) and explained how i want to create a late 1970's look. Well a few people heard this, and you know how old people never throw anything out, well i hit a jackpot when about 4 of them gave me their late husbands complete warddrobes, and it is all late 1970's.

I am talking powerder blue safari suits, huge shirts! load everything. There are also thrift stores here, i picked up around 5 tweed suits size 42 (which most cast will fit in) for around $5 each.

Then i approached 3 clubs i know the owner of, he has one named aqua, this is the most 1970's place you have ever seen, it is white everywhere with the full curvy chic cocaine '54' style look that is perfect.

As for music i found a heap of public domain 1970's music that basicly the rights had been lost over the years and showing up on bootlegs mostly funded by the mob, really great stuff too.

We have 3 cars to use, a 1976 lincon, which is a BOAT it is the biggest car i have ever seen, in Australia we never had cars like that!

A holden torana, which was the hoon car of choice in the 1970's, and a FJ Holden which was the most famous 1970's family car.

As for the sets, one of my families businesses is a hotel, (come to melb you can stay cheap) and has a conference room, i am taking over it for a while and using it as a set, but i also have access to a proper playhouse with studio lighting near here, which i may use as well.

I am now looking for a few sponsors, but i can see no problem with being careful and getting it done properly.

kermie
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Old December 8th, 2002, 08:56 AM   #4
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Kermie,

You forgot the good ole HQ Kingswood and the Valiant. If you want to go for that 70's look don't forget the flanny with the black AC/DC shirt and durries in the sleve.

As for the look, soft and washed out. De-saturate and use diffusion filters.
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Old December 8th, 2002, 08:59 AM   #5
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Ahahah

HQ and the good ole Valiant, my father had a lime green valiant with a 426 hemi in it.

We are not really going for the 'ozzie bogan' ACDC look. A bit of the joke is how many american cue's we are using, yet everyone in it is australian.

kermie
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Old December 8th, 2002, 01:36 PM   #6
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Kermie,

One of the key "looks" to 70's style filmmaking.

The zoom lens.

Seriously, DP's went crazy ZOOMING in and out. Tracking and dollying was out, zooming was in. This is really more a stylistic note, rather than a Production value note.

Also, consider super 8 for some of the stuff. Not sure what the story line is, but shooting super 8 at 18fps, then transfering and synching music/fx/foley and even some adr, will give you that film look with the "dark" edges.

I don't remember the 70's myself, but then, that's pretty standard isn't it?
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Old December 8th, 2002, 05:11 PM   #7
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There were a couple of things going on that were specific to late 70's filmmaking but not necessarily the same things as were being done in episodic. Bill is right in thinking that the zoom was being used a lot, particular on television. Theatrically, a popular filter from the early to late 70's was the Harrison + Harrison Double Fog filter, which contrary to the name did not mean that it produced an extremely foggy image, but more like a precursor to the Promist line. Lots of blooming around highlights and slight diffusion to this filter. Also, especially in disco scenes, the venerable star filter was often in effect, making the theatrical lights in the ceiling and the disco balls sparkle...!
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Old December 8th, 2002, 06:14 PM   #8
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Kermie,

My suggesting the bogan look was very tounge in cheek. I actually hate that look. There was a time in Australian movies where that's all you would see, that would make anyone outside of Australia think that we all lived in Western Sydney and dressed like that.
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Old December 17th, 2002, 11:18 AM   #9
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Don't forget..

the campy makup; one Rockford files, Dukes of Hazzard, or Angles episode shoud give you a great look to go for
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Old December 20th, 2002, 09:35 PM   #10
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You are also going to have to treat the image in post, The film stock of the time was different than the current offerings, You should get a still and then try to match it in post. The tint was a little different, it brough out the earthy tones and seemed to be shifted red.
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Old December 20th, 2002, 09:41 PM   #11
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I have this film look plugin for after effects here that lists heaps of different types of film stock.

Any real film guru's here could give me the actual techinical name of the film stock, or similar film stocks that were used in those days so i can search through and see if i find it.

kermie
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Old December 20th, 2002, 10:16 PM   #12
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Kermie,

I just watched "Thunderbolt & Lightfoot" again for the first time in a long time. If you want to see some 70s fashion, check it out.
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Old December 21st, 2002, 06:34 PM   #13
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The most popular stock in the 70's was 5247, which replaced 5254 in the middle of the decade. However, there were many other factors such as the print stock and the effect of 30 years of aging on those films as well as the telecine technology of the day that gave those films a particular look theatrically and on television. Viewing a DVD that has been struck from a modern telecine off the negative often yields results that are surprising, if one has been used to seeing a particular movie for years looking washed out, faded or desaturated.
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