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Old December 26th, 2005, 01:22 PM   #1
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What is the technique called, how is it achieved?

The technique is hard for me to describe, the subject in front of the camera stays still, while the back ground seems to move dramatically behind them, almost a zooming effect behind the subject.

If you know what I mean please post a few examples of it for study and please tell us how you did it. Currently I own a PD170 and Apple w/fcp5 studio. No other lenses other than what came with the PD170.

Its killing me to know what this is and how its done. I'm learning, this is a hobby for me. But someday I want to grow up to be a videographer/editor. Im 36 now. he he he. Thank you in advance.

If you know of any sites that show othe effects and how to achieve them, It would be appreciated.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 01:41 PM   #2
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This is done by zooming while dollying forward or backwards against the subject. It's called a Hitchcock zoom or a Vertigo effect, I think it was done first in the movie 'Vertigo' from a while back.

The camera is pulled away from a subject while you zoom in with your lens. Or the other way around (Dolly forward and zoom out)

Kind regards,
Andreas
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Old December 26th, 2005, 03:13 PM   #3
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I am yet a grasshopper

I've heard that term many times, and yet I did not realize. It must take much practice to do that. A dolly is necessary to pull it off then? We'll I better by some skate boards and work on the the zoom. If anyone could post a few of those I'd love to see it.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 04:32 PM   #4
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i looked some more ...

http://www.maxoncomputer.com/tutoria...ialID=61&site=

http://www.siggraph.org/education/ma...a_techniqu.htm

im still curious of the techniques.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 04:55 PM   #5
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The reason why it's so difficult is because (depending on which effect do you want) you have to ZOOM and TRAVEL at completely the SAME speed, otherwise it doesn't work. (Or at least not good enough)

btw: also used in Jaws.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 09:37 PM   #6
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Just to kinda add something its not difficult to learn....it can actually be done while hand holding the camera as well.....but it is something that is hard to master to have the right effect. Also you want to make sure you use it in the right situation.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 10:00 PM   #7
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It's called a zolly (zoom + dolly)
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Old December 26th, 2005, 10:11 PM   #8
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It sounds like it should be called verti-no

Reading even more about this Vertigo shot, some one at this site:
http://www.filmmaker.com/DUMPS.html

Dolly/Zoom
No question. This is the most egregious, blatantly non-creative, non-cool, total student film red flag. Sure, Hitchcock used it in Vertigo, Spielberg used it Jaws, but enough is enough. It's cliched, overused, goofy, and overall a bad idea. By the way, what we're talking about here is a simultaneous Dolly-in/Zoom-out or vice-versa which compresses the background while keeping the subject at a fixed size during the shot. A student-film no-no. (The dolly/zoom is such a mark of a student film, it's a joke in the opening of THE BIG PICTURE.)

Hmmm I still wont give up, I just thought this was interesting. I like every side and all opinions.
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Old December 26th, 2005, 10:18 PM   #9
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Emre ,also called a doom (dolly + zoom)
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Old December 27th, 2005, 05:55 AM   #10
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I've heard it called a "counter" or "counter-zoom."
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Old December 27th, 2005, 09:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Nelson
Dolly/Zoom
No question. This is the most egregious, blatantly non-creative, non-cool, total student film red flag. Sure, Hitchcock used it in Vertigo, Spielberg used it Jaws, but enough is enough. It's cliched, overused, goofy, and overall a bad idea. By the way, what we're talking about here is a simultaneous Dolly-in/Zoom-out or vice-versa which compresses the background while keeping the subject at a fixed size during the shot. A student-film no-no. (The dolly/zoom is such a mark of a student film, it's a joke in the opening of THE BIG PICTURE.)

Hmmm I still wont give up, I just thought this was interesting. I like every side and all opinions.
In "The Cooler" this effect was used (IMHO effectively). But the movie is very tongue-in-cheek, so this was more funny than distracting. Also, IIRC it was used in "Campaign" with the same funny result. I think it is a good point that you should only use it in parodies/comedies. Even campy horror films.. It elicits an "amused" response from the audience.
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Old December 27th, 2005, 03:40 PM   #12
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Depending on the nature of your production, you might want to consider motion backgrounds instead? You would need a blue screen or green screen for this and some quality choices of motion backgrounds, such as Jump Backs from Digital Juice.
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Old December 27th, 2005, 04:26 PM   #13
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I've seen this done in a lot of Wes Craven films. From my understanding there has to be a good amount of distance between the subject and the background, as well as symetrical angles in the shot, i.e. a long hallway, or tunnel.
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Old December 28th, 2005, 01:10 AM   #14
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Was this the technique used (although to a more extreme degree) in "Poltergeist" when Jobeth Williams reached the upstairs hallway and saw the hallway stretch off into the distance...and then as she began running down the hallway it suddenly zoomed forward again and compressed the distance?


BTW: In a somewhat minor, yet bothersome fashion, I have had this effect occur naturally with myself while walking in a few locations - due to a little eyeball shape defect and depth perception problem that has caused me to experience a style of this doom/zolly effect when I'm not wearing my glasses - It's pretty weird.
-Jon
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