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Old January 23rd, 2006, 03:49 AM   #1
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Glidecam weight problem

I just got a my glidecam v16 and I almost had a heart attack carrying the camera which is about 18lbs. How do you guys keep the glidecam on the vest without collapsing? I can't do more than 1-2 minutes tops before I have to put it back on the C-Stand.

Any suggestions? Does it get better, and when? My back is killing me.

Thanks
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 05:03 AM   #2
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Hi Brian,

I was the same when I first started but it does get better, the more you use it the more you'll get used to it and the longer you'll be able to fly for. My advice is to just keep practicing. :D

John.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Duke
I just got a my glidecam v16 and I almost had a heart attack carrying the camera which is about 18lbs. How do you guys keep the glidecam on the vest without collapsing? I can't do more than 1-2 minutes tops before I have to put it back on the C-Stand.

Any suggestions? Does it get better, and when? My back is killing me.

Thanks
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 05:30 AM   #3
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Using a stabilizer, or any heavy camera, requires a fair degree of physical fitness. You get some exercise just operating, but an overall regimen is probably a good supplement. I also found that the heat of the vest was a problem. I am now better able to tolerate heat, but always keep hydrated even if you begin to get more comfortable.
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 06:03 AM   #4
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If I am not mistaken V16 does not have a socket block which sets the
sled in a floating position. So you always have to fight to keep the sled
in a proper operating position. As a result your body posture will be tilted
to compensate for that. The heavier the camera the worst it gets. Eventually
you will get in shape. A tilted shape though.

Good luck
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 01:17 PM   #5
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Over time not only do the muscles in the back get used the new type of weight bearing, the body "learns" how to minimize the strain in various ways. A typical tendency for new operators is to keep the rig further from the body than it needs to be, which causes exponentially more strain. Experiment with pushing the rig out to full extension and bringing it back in to your chest, and this will become apparent.

Also make good use of the rest position whenever possible, where the post is resting on the shoulder at a 45 degree angle, and rock back on your heels--this will alleviate the weight on the flying muscles.

If you can get to the gym and use the back extension machine or the roman chair with progressive weights, it will help you along.
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 03:24 PM   #6
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Didn't somebody here make a modification to their V16 (or was it a V8) so the arm atached to the back of the vest? As I recall, that supposedly took out a lot of the strain...
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 03:31 PM   #7
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Thanks guys. It helped a lot to hear that I was.am not alone . How long can you guys hold a heavy camera? It seems like just a matter of minutes, but on the other hand it seems that some shoots, such as television (E.R.) would require much longer. I guess will tell with me. It did get better after a few times, but boy am I sore today ... =)
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 04:29 PM   #8
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I've worn the Glidecam for up to an hour but sweated like a pig. Drinking enough water helps somewhat.

Part of the trick is to keep the weight centered over your feet. Don't try to keep upright with your muscles. Instead, position the camera and the rig so that you make your bones support the weight.

And make good use of the hip belt -- have that support most of the weight instead of the shoulder straps. Your legs will support most of the weight and save your back from unnecessary strain.

And, as mentioned by everyone else, keeping in decent shape is a big part of it. I used to do a lot of endurance bike riding. While that didn't help a bit with wearing the Glidecam, it does provide some endurance capacity to help me tolerate the load for a longer period of time.
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 04:56 PM   #9
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Dean, I'm not sure that's the best advice, at the end of the day we need to tone our muscles to support this weight not use our bones. You don't want to put unneccassary strain on the joints or bones.

The vest should be adjusted in such a way that the weight is distributed, I know "that muscle" in the back gets sore but that just one part of the body that needs to build up to enable us to go for longer.

There's a good pdf file over on the steadicam site all about posture with steadicam, I would say it's a must read for all new operators.

Here's the link.
http://www.steadicam.com/userimages/SteadiPos1.pdf

John.
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Old January 23rd, 2006, 10:01 PM   #10
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Thanks guys. Nice read that article. Need to hit the floor for some back extensions =) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 .....
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Old January 24th, 2006, 06:36 AM   #11
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new video

Charles Papert, btw when is the new video coming up.


Alexandre
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