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Old January 14th, 2003, 07:23 PM   #1
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"Zombie Film" with XL1s

Myself and a group of friends are planning to make a zombie movie. (for fun)

Camera: Canon XL1s (kit)

Budget: Limited

1. What lights are best for indoor shooting or should I use normal lights with more GAIN?

2. We have done some practice indoor shoots, looks good in the viewfinder, but when viewed on the television, things look grainy.

3. Some action scenes will be shot outdoors on sunny days. Any advice?

4. Is it worth getting a boom mic?

Lots of questions I know, but this is my first good camera.

Any ideas/advice appreciated from this film newbie.

Thanks
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Old January 14th, 2003, 07:40 PM   #2
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1) Use professional lights and you should have less problems. Your lighting needs will vary depending on what you want your movie to look like.

2) The viewfinder is a whole lot smaller than your TV. Detail tends to get lost in it. Get yourself a portable monitor if possible.

3) Shoot with the sun at your back. Try and get some large sheets to diffuse the sunlight. Keep your viewfinder tilted down.

4) Yes. Bad sound sucks.

Last bit of advice, get a good make-up person. If zombies don't look like zombies, you fail. Get a couple of make up people if you have more than a few actors.

Do you have a website with test shots? If you can supply us with some, we could give you more detailed advice.
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Old January 14th, 2003, 08:33 PM   #3
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We will be putting up some test shots in a couple of months, I will post the url here when its done.

Should a "boom mic" be required?

Thanks


<<<-- Originally posted by Dylan Couper : 1) Use professional
4) Yes. Bad sound sucks.

Do you have a website with test shots? If you can supply us with some, we could give you more detailed advice. -->>>
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Old January 14th, 2003, 09:31 PM   #4
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Do you require good sound? If so, yes, use a boom mic. If not, use a boom mic anyway, because as I said, bad sound sucks.


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Old January 15th, 2003, 05:01 AM   #5
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I didn't have much problems with my XL1s under "just" room-light.
So you should be okay. I tend to underexpose a bit when just
looking at my viewfinder because my footage tend to come out
more exposed than I think. Ofcourse you will need to lower your
f-stop and iris to get more light in. Otherwise add more lighting!

If possible get a monitor/TV on your set to get a better idea of
your footage. The viewfinder is in my opinion too far off with:
- exposure
- some people say also focussing, haven't had much troubles my self with this
- framing (way to much underscan)

etc..

I would definitely get a boom mic. If you have no money this
can be as simple as taping a microphone to a long pole (paint
pole etc... anything long and sturdy that isn't to heavy or makes
noice etc.) with some dampening material inbetween.

Good luck!
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Old January 15th, 2003, 12:43 PM   #6
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My best advice would be to throw out most everything you know about 'normal' lighting and try some new things. In other words, think outside the box. Harsh light, long shadows, and low angle lighting go a long way when making these types of movies. Subtracting light is also another trick. Less can usually mean more.

G
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