What camera would you take to Iraq? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Open DV Discussion
For topics which don't fit into any of the other categories.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 3rd, 2006, 11:00 AM   #1
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
What camera would you take to Iraq?

I have a good friend in the Army National Guard who is about to get deployed to Baghdad. He asked me advice on what camcorder he should get. He doesn't want to spend a whole lot, because he assumes it will be completely trashed by the time he gets home anyway. His top concern is reliability, and has been considering a solid state or hard drive based camcorder of some kind. I guess the sand just gets in everything over there. Any suggestions?
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 11:14 AM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: vancouver
Posts: 310
hmmm.... i'd opt for DVX100a/b/rain housing.
Saturnin Kondratiew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 11:30 AM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
Well, he really needs something close to pocket sized. Also, price is a big deal. I don't think he wants to spend over $400. Image quality is not a big factor here. He needs something very portable, cheap, and rugged.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 11:58 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: vancouver
Posts: 310
ah, gocha... i'm not sure how DVD camreas are, but u can get a basic hand held minidv unit at best buy for 400-500bux. How they are in dusty situations, well, i'm sure they'd do their job, everything is made pretty well nowadays.
Saturnin Kondratiew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 12:17 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 385
one of the small 1 chip miniDV Canon's would probably work. Although I'd imagine it could get pretty hot over there. I'm not sure which media handles heat better. The Panasonic GS300 or GS500 might be a good option.
Tony Tibbetts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 03:56 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Tibbetts
The Panasonic GS300 or GS500 might be a good option.
Deffinetly. Maybe even look in the lower range (Gs 300/500 are bigger than the ones im going to mention) such as the GS65, GS70 and GS120. You can pick those up off eBay for no more than $300. Excellent quality (I know you said quality doesn't matter), very easy to use and if he wants he could just get a couple 1gig SD cards and record onto those. These cameras easily fit into coat pockets as well.
Amit Sitapara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 3rd, 2006, 04:51 PM   #7
Air China Pilot
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 2,389
Marco, what is his purpose for the camera?

If he just wants to send home hi momma clips maybe a digital still camera with movie capability?
__________________
--
Visit http://www.KeithLoh.com | stuff about living in Vancouver | My Flickr photo gallery
Keith Loh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2006, 03:13 PM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Albany, NY 12210
Posts: 2,650
It's more than that. I think he's interested in documenting a pretty significant experience in his life. He's not making a documentary or anything. For better or for worse, this is going to be a once in a lifetime experience.
Marco Leavitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2006, 04:54 PM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Elk Grove CA
Posts: 6,838
I have a Panny GS120. Its a three chipper, simple to use, and rugged.
__________________
Chris J. Barcellos
Chris Barcellos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2006, 06:21 PM   #10
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Franklin Furnace, Ohio
Posts: 74
I have a GS250. It's a very good camera IMO. But it's not as easy to carry in a pocket as some others around. The flash memory based cameras actually take pretty decent video and they will fit in a pocket easily. With the price of memory down as much as it is they could be a good choice for someone looking for a camera they can hide easily. I have some experience with a Panasonic D-SNAP. It shoots better video than a person might expect for a camera that is so small.
Jeff Phelps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2006, 09:33 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: NYC
Posts: 649
Whatever he gets, he'll want to get two, or three.

God bless him and protect him.
__________________
Mark Sasahara
Director of Photography
Mark Sasahara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2006, 09:59 AM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: PERTH. W.A. AUSTRALIA.
Posts: 4,356
A camera which looks like a home enthusiast's handycam and does not look like a shoulder launched missile in silhouette on a dark night or in a split-second daytime glimpse during high intensity events is likely safest.

He will need to remember to deselect or black out the telltale lamps if using the thing at night and use the eyepiece not LCD screen at night which no doubt as a military serviceman he already knows.

An added bonus with a small cam, some of the passive intensified night-vision monoculars (Pyser SGI) can be ordered with a 37mm diam camcorder adaptor and relay optic which goes straight on. So he may be able to buy in a similar relay optic to match the in-field IR devices in use with the money he saves by buying the smaller cheaper camera. If it is available it will likely be in the US$400 ballpark.

The bigger cams need much more expensive and camera specific intensified IR hardware.

As much as I like my MiniDV tapes, I would favour the memory type recording media versus tapes or DVD disks, both of which are going to be vulnerable to physical damage excessive heat and dust after removal from their cameras.

Hard drives are good for dust because they are sealed but I am not to sure how much shock loading or heat they will take before failure. He may also not find handy facility in the field to offload the images to permanent storage from the hard drive when it is full.

I know very little about memory type recording media. If it has an internal battery memory, then the working life of this battery needs to be regarded as degraded to about 65% if operating in hot climate.

The cam is likely to need to be discreet, therefore very small because military authorities traditionally have not favoured happy snaps or home movies by the troops. It needs to be absolutely simple to operate in order it does not become a distraction to vigilence.

Last but not least, two clear or UV filters, one for spare, both to protect the lens.

Wish the guy good luck. He is going to a place I would not care to be.
Bob Hart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2006, 11:48 AM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Viroqua, WI
Posts: 49
We filmed a micro-budget documentary film on the Sony PC-1000. It performed quite well, holding up under moist, dirty conditions... slung around my neck exploring mountains, jungles and crowded markets. It's Mini-DV based, and very diminutive in size. Street price < $1000.
__________________
~Dr. Tony Macasaet
http://www.macastat.com
Tony Macasaet is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:16 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network