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Old October 10th, 2006, 12:23 PM   #1
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Peabody, MA
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Sony CCZ-A 26-pin cables

Hi,
Recently, one of the cables that goes from one of our CCUs to our Sony CA-D50 Cameras has been acting up. If the cable is crimped or curled one way, we lose all control over that particular camera until it is turned off, the cable straightened, and then turned back on. These cables we have are probably 75 feet, 50 of which probably gets used. Is there any way I can cut out the "bad" part of the cable (which is likely in that condition from getting stepped on so much) and solder the connector onto the cable? The connectors are 26 pin like the ones seen here :

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search

We do have the money to buy another cable, although much shorter (probably 35') but I'd hate to throw away 75' of cable when the part that's likely frayed/shorting is only 20' down the line. If anyone knows about anything concerning these cables, I'd appreciate some info. Thanks a lot everyone!!
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Old October 10th, 2006, 01:09 PM   #2
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most of these cables have plain soldered conductors, so chopping it off, and reterminating is really practical IF you can solder properly. The secret is to do the prep work properly - cable length of each core is pretty important. There is little space to cope with cores too long. The usual way is to start with the centre cores first. Any screened cores need the braid teasing out and shielding with either heat shrink sleeving, or hellerman sleeving. Unsolder the old plug, making very careful notes of which core goes where and use a solder sucker to remove the old solder. Then fill each solder bucket with fresh solder - not too much. Each core on the new end should have just the end twisted and tinned. You'll need a fine tipped soldering iron. If you are using heat shrink sleeving, you can leave it loose and then once the solder joint is made, slide the sleeve down to cover the joint. when all of the inner circle is soldered and sleeved, then use the heat gun to set the sleeves in place. Then do the next 'ring'.

Possible problems.

The major snag is making sure little strands don't get missed and touch other pins. Make sure you really can do proper solder joints - heat the bucket, not the core, when the solder flows, insert the tinned end and hold still till it solidifies - no blowing! It sounds unlikely, but it is known for the entire plug to be put on the mirror image of how it should be. often as a result of making a chart saying pin3 - pink, pin 4 - green - using the numbers moulded into the plug insert - however this depends on if you are lookingfrom the front or the rear!

Last cock-up - make sure you don't melt the plastic insert by heating the pins for too long.

If you discover a short on testing, then if it's on the outer ring of conenctions you can fix it. if it's on any of the inners - cut it off and start again.

have fun
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Old October 10th, 2006, 01:31 PM   #3
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Wow, thanks SO much for that info! I've seen connectors that have been hot glued into place, etc, so as to keep people from re-using them. I'm glad to hear that this is likely to be a feasible chop and resolder. I think this may be worth a shot rather than spending $600 on a new cable that's shorter than what we've got.
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Old October 20th, 2006, 06:49 AM   #4
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26-pin cables

I have replaced 3 connectors for our cameras. It is not a job for the faint of heart. If you do not have much soldering experience, devote a whole day for the first one and keep good notes on the pin-out. If you buy new connectors, keep the old parts. I found the rubber boot or sleeve that goes on the cable may be a different size than the original. The cup plate will be the same size and that is what you would want to replace anyway.
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Old October 20th, 2006, 07:12 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Simpson
Hi,
Recently, one of the cables that goes from one of our CCUs to our Sony CA-D50 Cameras has been acting up. If the cable is crimped or curled one way, we lose all control over that particular camera until it is turned off, the cable straightened, and then turned back on. These cables we have are probably 75 feet, 50 of which probably gets used. Is there any way I can cut out the "bad" part of the cable (which is likely in that condition from getting stepped on so much) and solder the connector onto the cable? The connectors are 26 pin like the ones seen here :

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search

We do have the money to buy another cable, although much shorter (probably 35') but I'd hate to throw away 75' of cable when the part that's likely frayed/shorting is only 20' down the line. If anyone knows about anything concerning these cables, I'd appreciate some info. Thanks a lot everyone!!
Hey Eric, much good advice here. You could probably ask around and find a technician who would be comfortable with soldering and checking the cable for you. Should still be less than the cost of a new one. Also, those type connectors often have crimp style pins. If this is the case with yours, you would need a special tool to do the crimping, along with an insertion/extraction tool set to remove the old pin from the connector housing, crimp on a new pin, and insert back into the connector housing. I've done many of these in my technician days. The good quality crimp tools are expensive though and are not cost effective unless you will be repairing many cables over time.

It's also my experience that cables like this tend to develop problems closer to the ends because that's where they see the most twisting and flexing.

And finally, I see you are in Peabody, MA. I've actually stayed there for two weeks while I was getting factory training on a machine whose vendor is just up 128 in Beverly. Beautiful country up that way. Couldn't believe all the granite laying around everywhere.

Good luck,

-gb-
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Old October 30th, 2006, 09:50 AM   #6
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Hi Greg,
Thanks for the advice! Because of the complexity of the cable and the connections involved, I'm currently seeking out someone to do the cut and solder job. I found one place that wanted $175 for the labor alone. I'm not sure if this is a fair price or not, but I'll be shopping for other quotes soon :)

Thanks all! I'll update the thread when I finally get it fixed.
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