Terminology at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Open DV Discussion
For topics which don't fit into any of the other categories.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 6th, 2003, 07:06 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Vallejo, CA
Posts: 263
Terminology

What are dutch angles and when would you use them whatever they maybe?

What is the 90 degree line of action?

Thanks.
__________________
"USA Today has come out with a new survey - apparently, three out of every four people make up 75% of the population." -David Letterman
Garret Ambrosio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 04:37 AM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: London
Posts: 189
Dutch camera angles are those in which vertical and horizontal are tilted in relation to the main film frame (eg the ground is at 30/45 degrees instead of parallel with the edge of the frame), often to evoke a sense of disequilibrium, for example a character's lack of mental balance.
Justin Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 05:44 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London, UK
Posts: 42
...and the 90 degree line is principally that you keep the cameras on one side of the action. In sports all the cameras are usually along one os the sides of the pitch so team a attacks from right to left. If you have a camera on the other side they would attack from left to right, making it very confusing for the viewer. This applies to all kind of shooting. Man walks out on the right side of the frame, he should enter on the left etc...

Interviews is no exception. The only important thing to remember is to decide where the line goes and stick to it.

Probably sounds a lot more complicated than it is....
__________________
Real Men do not Preview
Jon Eriksson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 06:20 AM   #4
RED Code Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Holland
Posts: 12,514
90 degree angle is best to see it visually. Draw two characters
(top view) on a piece of paper. Now draw the line of sight between
those characters (straight line). Now imagine the camera being
on the left side of the line looking straight at the two characters.
If you were to move it to the opposite position on the other side
of the line than your characters would suddenly switch places
on screen. This is confusing for the viewer. Therefor once you
choose a side of the line stick to it. You can move your camera
on the whole 90 degrees without any problems....
__________________

Rob Lohman, visuar@iname.com
DV Info Wrangler & RED Code Chef

Join the DV Challenge | Lady X

Search DVinfo.net for quick answers | Buy from the best: DVinfo.net sponsors
Rob Lohman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 12:33 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Vallejo, CA
Posts: 263
Thanks guys you definitely know your stuff.
__________________
"USA Today has come out with a new survey - apparently, three out of every four people make up 75% of the population." -David Letterman
Garret Ambrosio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 12:48 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Flagstaff, AZ
Posts: 473
Rob,

Best job I've seen anyone do explaining that. It sounds so complex and difficult in so many explanations. Good Job!
Rob Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 03:47 PM   #7
RED Code Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Holland
Posts: 12,514
Thanks Rob! I just opened my "film directing shot by shot" book
to check up on my story. The term used is indeed line of action
and it looks like I've described it pretty accurately. The book
also goes down into detail what happens to the Line of Action
if someone moves or you are shooting moving objects like cars
etc. It also goes into moving the Line of Action itself.

For anyone who has the book the Line of Action is being
described in part 2 (Elements of The Continuity Style), chapter
6 (Composing Shots: Spatial Connections) page 129 till 143.
__________________

Rob Lohman, visuar@iname.com
DV Info Wrangler & RED Code Chef

Join the DV Challenge | Lady X

Search DVinfo.net for quick answers | Buy from the best: DVinfo.net sponsors
Rob Lohman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2003, 04:35 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: New York
Posts: 329
Another recommendation is:

"The Five C's of Cinematography", it may be dated, but the information is current and applicable.

I'll post some mistakes where I crossed the line of action and the "characters" were transposed.

Cheers!
Derrick Begin is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:05 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network