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Old October 12th, 2010, 08:04 PM   #196
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1st Footage from AF100

Here is first released footage from a prototype AF100 posted on vimeo.


Looks good!

Cheers,

Vaughan
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Old October 12th, 2010, 08:25 PM   #197
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Panny's gonna sell a lot of these things...

Canon might just want to push that Mark III release up a bit.
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Old October 12th, 2010, 09:01 PM   #198
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Originally Posted by Vaughan Wood View Post
Here is first released footage from a prototype AF100 posted on vimeo.

Looks good!

Cheers,

Vaughan
Looks fantastic, of course the "...Zeiss Ultra Primes, HDSDI output, recording at 100 mbs on the AVC Intra HD codec..." probably have just a little bit to do with this image quality!!
Still very nice to look at. I'm looking forward to seeing what Lumix lenses on AVCHD look like.
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Old October 14th, 2010, 04:27 PM   #199
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New Info for the Af-100.

PANASONIC ANNOUNCES DECEMBER DELIVERY, PRICING FOR AG-AF100

4/3” PROFESSIONAL HIGH-DEFINITION CAMCORDER




Best-in-Class 4/3” Sensor Delivers Depth of Field and Field of View Similar to that of 35mm Movie Camera; Camcorder Uses Low-Cost Still Camera and Film-Style Lenses



SECAUCUS, NJ (October 13, 2010) – Panasonic Solutions Company today announced that the

AG-AF100, the industry’s first professional micro 4/3-inch video camcorder optimized for high-definition video recording, will start shipping on December 27th at a suggested list price of $4,995. Highly anticipated since its introduction at NAB earlier this year, the AF100 is poised to set new benchmarks in digital cinematography.



Targeted at the video and film production communities, the AF100 delivers the shallow depth of field and wider field of view of a large imager, with the flexibility and cost advantages of a growing line of professional quality, industry-standard micro 4/3-inch lenses, filters, and adapters. The full HD 1080 and 720 production camera offers superior video handling, native 1080/24p recording, variable frame rates, professional audio capabilities, and compatibility with SDHC and SDXC media.



“The design of the AF100’s best-in-class 4/3-inch sensor affords depth of field and field of view similar to that of 35mm movie cameras in a more affordable camera body,” said Jan Crittenden Livingston, Product Line Business Manager, Panasonic Solutions Company. “What’s more, Panasonic engineering ingenuity has resolved the aliasing and moiré that has haunted the DSLR shooter. Indeed, the proof of concept of the AF100 was based on what we heard from and saw customers doing: purchasing DSLR cameras because they liked the look of the image, but then agonized over all of the workarounds required to come out with an acceptable high definition recording.”



The AF100 incorporates a large 4/3-inch,16:9 MOS imager that minimizes skew with fast imager scanning, and incorporates low pass filters for elimination of aliasing and moiré. Additionally, it has a built-in optical ND filter. The camcorder records 1080 at 60i, 50i, 30P, 25P (Native) and 24P (Native), and 720 at 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p and 24p native,in AVCHD’s highest-quality PH mode (maximum 24Mbps). The AF100 also records in AVCCAM’s HA (17 Mbps) and HE (6Mbps) modes, 1080i only. Ready for global production standards, the camcorder is 60Hz and 50Hz switchable. Equipped with an interchangeable micro 4/3-inch lens mount, the AF100 can utilize an array of low-cost, widely-available still camera lenses as well as film-style lenses with fixed focal lengths and primes.



Variable frame rates are available in 1080p, selectable in 20 steps from 12p to 60p at 60Hz and 20 steps from 12p to 50p at 50Hz. Standard professional interfaces include uncompressed 4:2:2, 8 Bit HD-SDI out; HDMI out; and USB 2.0. It records SMPTE timecode and is able to perform timecode synchronizing via the video output seeing timecode in. It has a built-in stereo microphone and features two mic/line, switchable XLR inputs with +48V Phantom Power capability. The camera can record 48-kHz/16-bit two-channel digital audio recording (in PH mode only) and supports LPCM/Dolby-AC3 in any of the modes.



This newest Panasonic AVCCAM camcorder is the first to enjoy the benefits of advanced SDXC media card compatibility in addition to existing SDHC card support. SDXC is the newest SD memory card specification that supports memory capacities above 32GB and up to 2TB. With two SD slots for continuous recording, the AF100 can record up to 12 hours on two 64GB SDXC cards in PH mode, with automatic clip spanning across the two cards.



Weighing only 3.5 pounds (without lens or battery), the AF100 is packed with high-end features including Dynamic Range Stretch in all modes and frame rates; six built-in, customizable scene files that are exchangeable for quick and easy matching between multiple cameras; seven built-in gamma curves with four selectable color matrices; Syncro-scan shutter; and a high-resolution LCD and viewfinder.



It also offers a focus assist that can be used while recording, which is color-on peaking and a focus bar; two sets of adjustable zebras; two manual black and white balance choices, and preset White Balance at 3200K, 5600K or variable; a waveform monitor and vectorscope for more accurate monitoring of broadcast safe levels. Other essential features include pre-record; an intervalometer function that can be set for up to 24 hours, programmable User Buttons; a Smart Battery interface for recording up to four hours with a 5400mA battery; metadata recording; and a wireless infrared remote controller.



Panasonic will support the AF100 with a three-year limited warranty (one year plus two extra years upon registration).



About Panasonic Solutions Company

Panasonic Solutions Company empowers people whose jobs depend on reliable technology. The company delivers collaboration, information-sharing and decision-support solutions for customers in government, healthcare, education and a wide variety of commercial enterprises. Products and services within the company’s portfolio include Panasonic Toughbook® mobile computing solutions, projectors, professional displays (including both plasma and LCD), and HD and 3D video acquisition and production solutions. As a result of its commitment to R&D, manufacturing and quality control, Panasonic is known for the reliability and longevity of its products. Panasonic Solutions Company is a Division of Panasonic Corporation of North America, which is the principal North American subsidiary of Panasonic Corporation (NYSE: PC).

All brand and company/product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of the respective companies. All specifications are subject to change without notice. Information on Panasonic Solutions Company’s full line of products can be obtained by calling 877-803-8492 or at Professional Video Cameras and equipment from Panasonic.

Last edited by Casey Krugman; October 14th, 2010 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Needed to make it look pretty...
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Old October 14th, 2010, 09:24 PM   #200
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How much does it's 8 bit processing affect the picture (when there are obviously higher bit rates possible)?

None, some, or potentially a lot? Guess I'm not exactly sure what that means....
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Old October 14th, 2010, 10:17 PM   #201
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Also how do people reckon 4/3" will be in lowlight compared to 3 1/2 inch chips?
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Old October 15th, 2010, 02:20 AM   #202
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That's a good question Jonathan as camcorders using half-inch chips have maximum apertures of f/1.9 at full tele - if you get my drift. 4/3rds cameras at the same (equivalent) focal length will struggle to hit f/5.6 and in most cases it'll be nearer f/6.8 unless the glass is huge. So that's a cool three stops they've got to claw back - which is asking a lot for a chip that's just 3x wider.

tom.
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Old October 15th, 2010, 01:23 PM   #203
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Tom, while you're right on your numbers... that's probably a worst case scenario comparison. Most people buying this camera probably won't be long lens shooters, but staged/dramatic production, where there are lots of fast lens options. Head to head in that case, bigger chips usually win.
But of course, no way to tell until we start to get our hands on them. Can't wait! :)
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Old October 15th, 2010, 02:11 PM   #204
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Originally Posted by John Vincent View Post
How much does it's 8 bit processing affect the picture (when there are obviously higher bit rates possible)?
It depends on the noise level of the camera. Except at the very top end, the limiting factor is camera noise - not codec bit depth - so 8 bit is fine at the acquisition level for the vast majority of cameras. All 10 bit recording will do is more accurately define the noise! (Not worth wasting bit rate on. :-) )

So 10 bit may be valid in something like a 3700, but not in a 371, and I suspect this camera will be the same.

That said, even if acquiring in 8 bit, there may be something to be gained by processing and post in a 10 bit codec such as ProRes, but it's always possible to transcode this or any other 8 bit codec.

I'd be more concerned about the 4:2:0 nature of the codec and (even more so) the overall compression level than the 8 bit nature. That's not due just to absolute quality considerations, but also the complexity and difficulty of editing, which can mean a transcode is highly desirable. On the face of it, there seems to be quite a lot to like about this camera, but the native codec is not one of them. It would be a far better camera, and needn't cost any more, if they'd done the same as Canon and used 50Mbs MPEG2 to CF cards. If it will take SDXC, that should itself be capable of 50Mbs fairly easily - possible even 100Mbs. (So AVC-Intra could be used with SDXC.)
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Old October 15th, 2010, 03:36 PM   #205
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RE: 8 bit out on HD-SDI

The AF100 will for sure accept SDXC and with 2x 64 GB SDXC card it will capture 12 hours of PH Quality (1080/60p). Yes, because of the though put of the card they could have used AVC-Intra, but the party link from Panasonic on this matter has always been the price point of the camera and not being able to hit the price point using AVC-Intra.

Also - I believe that the HD-SDI output bypasses the AVC Codec - the footage that every one has been reveiwing from Crews.tv was taken on an AG-HPG20 at 100 Mbit AVC-Intra on to P2!
See their blog post about the shoot at:
AF100 Storm Gathers | crews.tv

"On this shoot Panasonic offered an AG-HPG20 P2 Memory Card Portable Recorder with AVC-Intra 100, a unit that doubled as a handy director’s monitor."

Also note - that we are accepting pre-orders on this camera at:
Panasonic AG-AF100 Micro Four Thirds CineCam(Cinema Camcorder)
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Old October 15th, 2010, 04:21 PM   #206
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......... the party link from Panasonic on this matter has always been the price point of the camera and not being able to hit the price point using AVC-Intra.
I'd assumed the comments about the price point of the camera referred to a scenario along the lines that if AVC-Intra had been used, it would have meant P2 and hence much higher memory costs. I don't think there is any valid technical reason why an AVC-Intra coder should be any more expensive than an AVC-HD one - they both use the same underlying technology, and if anything AVC-HD should be MORE difficult to implement (hence more expensive) owing to the long-GOP nature.

But if this camera is capable of using SDXC, it shouldn't need P2 anyway - SDXC should be up to recording 100Mbs.

Look at Canons XF100. Canon have managed to put a fully broadcast approved codec into a far cheaper camera than the AF100. Why can't Panasonics technicians manage the same?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Parler
Also - I believe that the HD-SDI output bypasses the AVC Codec
Yes indeed, and I think an external recorder is likely to be a must have for any purchaser of one of these. Personally, I'd go for a device that records to smaller and cheaper memory (such as a nanoFlash) than the AG-HPG20 - but why should it be necessary to spend a lot of money when a far better codec could be there natively? Canon can do it - why not Panasonic?
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Old October 16th, 2010, 02:42 AM   #207
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It depends on the noise level of the camera. Except at the very top end, the limiting factor is camera noise - not codec bit depth - so 8 bit is fine at the acquisition level for the vast majority of cameras. All 10 bit recording will do is more accurately define the noise! (Not worth wasting bit rate on. :-) )

So 10 bit may be valid in something like a 3700, but not in a 371, and I suspect this camera will be the same.

That said, even if acquiring in 8 bit, there may be something to be gained by processing and post in a 10 bit codec such as ProRes, but it's always possible to transcode this or any other 8 bit codec.

I'd be more concerned about the 4:2:0 nature of the codec and (even more so) the overall compression level than the 8 bit nature. That's not due just to absolute quality considerations, but also the complexity and difficulty of editing, which can mean a transcode is highly desirable. On the face of it, there seems to be quite a lot to like about this camera, but the native codec is not one of them. It would be a far better camera, and needn't cost any more, if they'd done the same as Canon and used 50Mbs MPEG2 to CF cards. If it will take SDXC, that should itself be capable of 50Mbs fairly easily - possible even 100Mbs. (So AVC-Intra could be used with SDXC.)
Hey, thanks a lot for that answer - helps out a lot.
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Old October 17th, 2010, 08:17 PM   #208
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Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick View Post
That's a good question Jonathan as camcorders using half-inch chips have maximum apertures of f/1.9 at full tele - if you get my drift. 4/3rds cameras at the same (equivalent) focal length will struggle to hit f/5.6 and in most cases it'll be nearer f/6.8 unless the glass is huge. So that's a cool three stops they've got to claw back - which is asking a lot for a chip that's just 3x wider.

tom.

Thanks Tom, I suppose proof will be in the fooatge that comes out. Interesting stuff though about focal lengths.

J
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Old October 17th, 2010, 08:58 PM   #209
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Agreed, 1080 60p would be so NICE to have. 720 60p is great but I don't understand how 1080 60p could be so hard to develop.

Any idea on how much these lenses will run?
I think 1080p60 as an overcrank is pretty useful. There is no way to deliver 1080p60 so shooting would just force a downconvert or framerate change anyway. It is still great they included it.
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Old October 19th, 2010, 09:15 AM   #210
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BH is showing that the AF100 is Temporarily out of stock for 6-10 weeks. Was it ever in stock or is 6-10 weeks when they expect to see it for the first time. that will put us at December.
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