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Old November 15th, 2010, 06:41 AM   #1
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Panasonic AG-AF101 or Panasonic AG-HVX201AE P2

Hi all , i need to help here, I want to upgrade to a new Panasonic, and i don't know which is best for me. Its between these two cameras, Panasonic AG-AF101 or Panasonic AG-HVX201AE P2 .

I have always liked the Panasonic AG-HVX201AE P2, and a lot of people that work in the same line as me use this camera , But lately more and more of these people have started to film using the new DSLR range, So much , that i have had to buy a Canon 7d to keep up with it.

Now i want to upgrade my HDV Camcorder too. I have a canon 7d with three Canon lens , 20mm , 50mm and the 28mm / 135mm .

I want to buy one more lens for this setup , But its all down to money, I have been reading a lot about the Panasonic AG-AF101 and its good to hear that i can use these lens on the Panasonic AG-AF101. But is it worth me buying one ? AS you can see i have the canon for the DOF effect , and will it be better for me to keep on the Pro Camcorder line and buy the Panasonic AG-HVX201AE P2 ?

Reason of , sometimes i need to use the zoom etc ,

Or is this camera being left be hide now with the launch of the Panasonic AG-AF101. This upgrade is very important as i can see myself changing cameras again for a number of years.

I will be using the cameras for creative work, as well as products videos too ,

Any help on this would be a great help.
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Old November 15th, 2010, 07:22 AM   #2
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My personal feeling on this dilemma is that it is great to have one (or more) small chip (in my case EX3/1R) and one (or more) large chip cam.

Now if you do stills as well then the 5DmkII/7D are really great, and I view them as SDOF adapters. The truth is they do a great job but have lots of problems (audio, ergos, rec time etc).

There are lots of times when a small chip with deep DOF is very handy, sports and other difficult to follow focus situations, like in theaters.

I will keep my 5DmkII but I also ordered an AF100. It is just another great tool in the quiver. I am selling my 7D though.

I think this is a very exiting time in equipment terms. The prices are lower than ever, and now you can use the same lenses with many different cameras. There are lots of great tools available.

The EXcams are my general ENG cams. The 5DmkII is in a class by itself wonderful SDOF and great low light, fantastic guerilla cam, and my still cam, just bear in mind the limitations of the codec. And I see the AF100 as a huge improvement over the 7D. I use a NanoFlash a lot and the AF100 seems like it will be a perfect fit with the NF.

These are just my current feelings, we will see how it pans out. But I see these classes as 3 distinctly different and very complimentary tools. At least for my style of shooting. I also think full size shoulder cams are a great tool. But I don't use them any more, I don't do long periods of ENG shouldering. And I prefer lighter cams like the EX3 with my shoulder bracket for this style of shooting now.

I plan to make my AF100 a better ergonomic fit than it now appears to be for shoulder shooting with IDX/AB batteries in the back and a nice shoulder rig, more on this later. Though I believe this cam will stay on the sticks/sliders/jibs/stedicams most of the time, for me anyway.
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Old November 15th, 2010, 08:15 AM   #3
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Sorri forgot to say i'm using a Full Sony HDV cam also, but on tape , i will sell this to help to fund my new Pan. I will keep my 7d for filming , I dont really shoot any photos either.
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Old November 15th, 2010, 12:34 PM   #4
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At the very least, I'd wait and see what Sony do about a rumoured large format video camera - a direct AF101 competitor.

So far they've announced the (consumer and cheap) VG10, and the (high end and far from cheap) F3. There are a lot of rumours that we're still to see something else - a direct AF101 competitor - and it may well become available around th same time as the AF101.
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Old November 16th, 2010, 12:32 PM   #5
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At the very least, I'd wait and see what Sony do about a rumoured large format video camera - a direct AF101 competitor.

So far they've announced the (consumer and cheap) VG10, and the (high end and far from cheap) F3. There are a lot of rumours that we're still to see something else - a direct AF101 competitor - and it may well become available around th same time as the AF101.
Sony better hurry - the AF100's supposed to start shipping in late December.

To the OP, is there a budget you're trying to fit within? I've worked with an HPX200a, and while a very good camera, they're being surpassed by the newer generation of camcorders.
The Sony EX line is a better camera, in my opinion. You can always buy used, if cost is a factor (as it most always is). Used HPX300 cameras are going for pretty cheap, under $6,000 USD. For that, you get AVC-intra recording on a shoulder mount form factor. The Canon XF300/305 look like excellent cameras and record to cheaper media than SxS and P2 cards. All of the cameras I mentioned have full-raster 1920x1080 imagers. But all are more expensive than the 201a.
I think it'd be good to always have a true ENG/EFP zoom lens HD camera in your arsenal. They're very versatile and there's hardly any shoot they can't handle.

But....I really like the AF100. I'm not sure how the broadcast world will accept the AVCHD 24mbps codec, but I don't know if you do lots of broadcast work. Of course, add a Nanoflash or some other external media and you'll get a better, broadcast quality 4:2:2 codec.

Which would I choose? The AF100, if only to play with the DoF. If you can afford it, the AF100 and a used HVX200 (under $3,000).
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Old November 17th, 2010, 05:54 AM   #6
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Sony better hurry - the AF100's supposed to start shipping in late December.
Looks like they heard you! Sony Global - News Releases - Sony to expand 35mm large format sensor camcorder lineup "NXCAM" HD camcorder under

It may be six months behind the AF101, and we're still waiting for the price, but amongst other things it has true 1080p/50(60) mode. It also looks like it's going to have a dedicated video sensor, rather than a sensor designed for still use with an OLPF in front.

If you need to buy a large sensor camera NOW, it's really between the AF101 and the F3. If your need isn't that urgent, I think it would be foolish to get an AF101 without waiting to hear more about this new Sony. And if you don't really need shallow DOF, I think the EX is better than any of them.
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Old November 17th, 2010, 07:35 AM   #7
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Whoa! Looks weird! And I thought the AF100 looked boxy! It looks more like a security cam or remote cam than a professional cam. I know it's still under development, but I sure hope the add an EFV.
So, this appears to be the pro version of the VG10 we've been asking for. Still using AVCHD, instead of an EX codec.
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Old November 17th, 2010, 07:53 AM   #8
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I think it may be significant that they are referring to a "Super35" sensor rather than "APS-C" (as the VG10 uses). That might imply it's less of a stills camera sensor adapted for video, but rather a sensor designed specifically for video. You COULD use the VG10 sensor with an optical low pass filter to get rid of aliasing, but far better to use a sensor with (lower) pixel count more suited to HD video.
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Old November 18th, 2010, 09:25 AM   #9
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I did look on the web about the Sony , Its looking like $22, 000 with lens , thinking its out of my price range. The only thing i was worried about is if the buy the AF100, i have to pay out for more lens etc , but just reading that they will be many options for using older cheaper lens like the FD canon range. Im guessing you will lose some quality. Umm , i reckon the best choice is the AF 100 . Most of my work for the next year will be only web base , so the i dont think missing that super high quality this camera can offer with super priced lens will effect me .
I think it will be a good match to my 7d too. Time for me to move to the film style filming too ,

Thanks for all the help.
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Old November 19th, 2010, 04:08 PM   #10
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...reading that they will be many options for using older cheaper lens like the FD canon range. Im guessing you will lose some quality.
You need to keep in mind that 1080P video is only 2 mega-pixels, so pretty much any SLR / DSLR lens should look quite sharp at this resolution. The higher quality Canon FD lenses should produce an excellent sharp image for the AF-100 camera.

The differences to look for between lenses are:

- Contrast ( older film lenses may have softer contrast )

- Lens Flare ( older film lenses may be more flare prone when filming with high contrast light sources )

- Color-balance ( each brand of lens has it's own color balance, so some brands may be cooler or warmer )

- Older film lenses are most likely mechanical, which means manually setting the aperture, the focus, and the zoom setting.

- Newer Panasonic and Olympus 4/3 digital lenses will have electronic aperture and focus capability, which could be adjusted remotely depending on the set-up. ( the Birger Canon EF mount enables remote focus-pulling and aperture control )
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