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Old May 1st, 2004, 04:28 AM   #16
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You're not off the hook yet. What about Tiffen filters? I have a few, and they certainly don't give the appearance of high-class glass. But the claim is that most were developed for use with film - not dv. Is there a difference between what Tiffen sells the film industry as opposed to what it sells the dv industry (in terms of glass, I mean, not filter size)?
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Old May 1st, 2004, 10:22 AM   #17
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Tiffen Polarizer Filter (MX5000)

http://www.dvuser.co.kr/zboard/data...ry/IMGA0830.JPG

http://www.dvuser.co.kr/zboard/data...ry/imga0831.jpg
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Old May 1st, 2004, 02:53 PM   #18
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Tiffen has a line of specialty filters developed for the film industry. These filters are for special effects. So it doesn't matter if the glass is cheaper glass or German Zeiss glass.
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Old May 1st, 2004, 03:32 PM   #19
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Thank you, Frank. Now I (or, rather, my wallet) feel safe going back into that camera store: the only filters worth paying extra for are the ones that cut down flare, whether green glass or not.
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Old May 1st, 2004, 04:43 PM   #20
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Quote:
the only filters worth paying extra for are the ones that cut down flare
Cutting down flare is best achieved with a hood and avoiding pointing at light sources. Usually using any filter can cause flaring, but mult-coating helps reduce this as well as thin filters which sit closer to the lens. A lot of photo guys I know don't use a protective filter but just as many do. But the ones that do use a Zeiss or Leica UV or skylight (for protection), and they all use a lens hood. This is photography, however, higher resolution, it is not low resolution video. Personally, I'm a filter believer. All my lenses are like new because I keep them protected. I also believe, even with photography, using a Cokin UV or a Heliopan UV doesn't make a difference, or at least I can't tell from my photos. In fact, I don't worry if my filters are multi-coated because I avoid shooting towards bright light sources, and I use a hood.

Oh, and these "purists," who don't believe in using a protective filter on their Leica, Zeiss or Nikkor lens, well, they usually go through a lot of lenses. If you can afford a Leica then you can afford going for a fresh lense or 2 every couple of years or sooner if the worst happans. This is not Pokey's way. Don't be afraid to use your gear, but always keep your gear protected. A UV offers good protection for the most important part of the camera: the lens.
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Old May 2nd, 2004, 01:05 PM   #21
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<<<-- Originally posted by Frank Granovski : Cutting down flare is best achieved with a hood and avoiding pointing at light sources. Usually using any filter can cause flaring, but mult-coating helps reduce this as well as thin filters which sit closer to the lens. A lot of photo guys I know don't use a protective filter but just as many do. But the ones that do use a Zeiss or Leica UV or skylight (for protection), and they all use a lens hood. This is photography, however, higher resolution, it is not low resolution video.-->>>

As many times in the past, and being an old chap, I would like to speak of what we did in the old 16mm Bolex days. In those times my task was to shoot 16mm as if it was 35mm, and with DV we wish to shoot as if it was Digibeta. I go even farther and wish to shoot DV as if it was film, but that is only my film head working.

The best to avoid a flare is to shade it, and not even the best hood, by Arriflex or Panavision, will solve them all. A french flag of some type should be what every serious videographer should take anywhere. A simple one: an articulated arm with a small flag should do it. The ones I know are from Lowel, but there are many cheaper around. They should cut 99.99% of the flares.

But if you are shooting against a bright source, the only thing that will cover you are your filters and lenses. The better multicoated they are the better you will come out a winner. Take advantage of it, don't fight it.

Personally I think the best filters for video are NDs (0.6 and 0.9 to keep F stops low), graduated NDs (this I would keep on the camera all the time. 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9) and pola screens. Pola screen are great for working outdoors, because they cut your stop by 2, and because they mekae your images look better.

You are certainly right, Frank, that people should always have a filter as lens protection. All the time.



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Old May 2nd, 2004, 01:43 PM   #22
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"A french flag of some type should be what every serious videographer should take anywhere. A simple one: an articulated arm with a small flag should do it. The ones I know are from Lowel, but there are many cheaper around. They should cut 99.99% of the flares."

As I said earlier, Carlos: Flarebuster.com.
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Old May 2nd, 2004, 02:09 PM   #23
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<<<-- Originally posted by Wayne Orr :
As I said earlier, Carlos: Flarebuster.com. -->>>

On the spot, Frank. That's the one I didn't remember.
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Old May 2nd, 2004, 10:14 PM   #24
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The polariser will be GREAT for Hawaii. You get super deep blue skies and well exposed skin tones when a polariser is used on sunny days.

Hoya's SHMC (Super Hoya Multi Coated) filters lets in 99.99% of light and prevents flaring by minimising internal refractions. That's the main reason why my UV(0) is on the lens all the time. I have NEVER scratched my lens in 5 years of video and photo shooting, not even the filter on the lens, but insurance in the form of a $20 filter is certainly worth it.
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