Filter and hood recommendation for PV-GS400 and Raynox HD-5000PRO set-up at DVinfo.net

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Old July 15th, 2004, 11:24 AM   #1
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Filter and hood recommendation for PV-GS400 and Raynox HD-5000PRO set-up

I am about to order PV-GS400 and Raynox HD-5000PRO Super Wideangle conversion lens. And I am considering UV and Polarizer filters for the camera. Will the members be able to clarify whether I need 43mm or 62mm filters (and hood) for the PV-GS400 & HD-5000PRO set-up? Any information on this such as the necessity of step-up or step-down rings would be greatly appreciated. I would welcome brand recommendations as well.

Thanks a lot!

Michael
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Old July 15th, 2004, 05:05 PM   #2
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You need a 62mm filter for the Raynox. Get the Hoya multicoated thins (try 2filter.com) for it to cut down on vignetting and flare. The cost of the lens plus the Hoyas works out to several hundred dollars - so now you have to worry about protecting your filters as well as the lens. I bought a B&W 62mm metal hood (for WA lenses) from B&H to go with the lens. The Raynox is actually 37mm at the thread-in point and comes with its own adapter rings, but they're plastic. I bought a generic metal one for my gs100 just because it made me feel more secure. Probably a longer life battery is as important as the WA. I would be sure to get one (or maybe two, depending on how much shooting you plan to do).
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Old July 15th, 2004, 05:29 PM   #3
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Or, you could get a P series Cokin system with a 62mm adapter. Then, you could stack up to 3 4x4cm Cokin filters in front of the lens. Cokin also makes a hood that clips to the filter holder.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 05:53 PM   #4
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Guy, would the P system be light weight? Could be good if so, as the gs100 has a relatively small body and adding the Raynox lens + hood to the front makes it front heavy (not as bad as when adding the Pana WA, though). The 400 is even smaller, so anything that cuts down on weight to the front would probably be helpful. Of course, if you use a tripod all the time, it may not matter.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 07:11 PM   #5
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Pat,
The filter system is light weight. I don't notice any imbalance on my DV953 with the A system. I suspect the P system is similar. Now it does extend the center of gravity forward on the camera a bit. Especially if you have 3 filters and a hood on.

I suggested the P system because it allows for larger diameter lenses. The A system, which is a little smaller, goes up to 62mm diameter. You may get some vignetting with very wide angle lenses with the A system.

BTW, you can stack the filter holders. So, you could have 6 filters, or more, in front of the lens...

There are pix of the Cokin system in the DV953 Album on my website.

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Old July 15th, 2004, 07:33 PM   #6
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Thanks a million to Patricia and Guy! I am rather inexperienced, currently filming high school activities with almost two-year old Panasonic PV-DV702 (with no accessories) and Canon PowerShot Pro 1 with 58 mm B+W MRC UV and Hoya HMC Cir-Polarizing filters. While filming school plays, etc., I’ve come to realize that I need a better video camera, to say the very least, wider angle and better low light performance. As my son goes to college this fall, I feel that it is time to move onto the next level.

I will definitely buy at least one longer life battery for PV-GS400. If I purchase 62mm UV and polarizer, could I stack the filters to the front end of the wide angle conversion lens? If so, then where exactly is the 62mm hood going? Can Patricia tell me the brand name of the metal adapter ring she is using? Will Guy elaborate on what the P series Cokin system is all about? Again, I am relatively new to this area.

Patricia raised a concern that Raynox lens + hood to 400 might be front heavy to the small body of 400. Though I decided on 400, I am still open to other wide angle options. If the members have a better idea on what the ideal 400 + wide angle set-up should be like, please post a reply or email to me directly. I would very much like hear about brand recommendations too.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 07:59 PM   #7
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MR,
If you use circular screw on filters, you will have to find a hood that screws onto the outer filter. You can, of course, stack circular filters but after 2 you may get vignetting with a WA lens.

It is hard to describe the Cokin system. It would be better to go to their site and look through the info there. But, basically the system is a square holder for up to 3 square plain glass filters. The filters slide into the holder in front of the lens. The holder uses an adapter ring that looks like a stepup ring but has no front thread. The holder slides down over the outer flange of the stepup ring (adapter) and locks in place. The filters are wide and tall enough to work with the widest angle of the DV953. Cokin also makes circular filters that mount into the holder and can be adjusted...for example, the polarizer filter. So, with this system, you don't need to buy screw in filters.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 08:01 PM   #8
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The Hoya thins are double-threaded, so you can thread something like the B&W metal hood I mentioned (or any hood of your choice) into the front. I think Guy knows of other WAs out there; the only two I have used are the Raynox and the Pana (which is much heavier than the Raynox and has no threading at the front for inserting filters).

Anything (except maybe a filter) you add to the front of the gs400 is going to throw off the balance - it's just a fact of life with a cam that small.

If low light performance is a concern, maybe you should test out some other cams, too. We don't know yet how well the gs400 will perform in low light conditions - though the suspicion is that it isn't going to be great. There's a low light mode for it, but it's probably similar to my gs100 and you will get grainier footage shooting in that mode. I use it all the time and really like it, but I don't have professional standards. Everyone says for low light performance in a hand-holdable cam you can't beat the Sony VXs, but they're larger and higher priced. On the other hand, if you're filming school plays, etc., it may be worth your checking out. The VX2100 is at least available on the market right now and you can probably try one out at a good camera retail store.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 09:56 PM   #9
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Thank you again to Patricia and Guy! Since VX2100 is outside of my budget, wouldn’t it better for me to purchase 400 and 43mm filters for it, to start with, given that there might be vignetting and weight balance issues with a wide angle? I might purchase a wide angle later on, using it with 400 (without any filters for the camera or wide angle lens if necessary to get the best results). By the way, my filming of school palys is rather amateurish and for family viewing only.

Michael
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Old July 15th, 2004, 10:52 PM   #10
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IMO, the must-have accessories to start-up are as follows:

1. extra battery (genuine Pany, equivalent or whatever). get the biggest one your budget will allow.

2. full time protetion of the lens glass. you can choose between an MC Protector (clear glass) or MC UV.


Filter for bright outdoors: I am using both ND4 and ND8m with Excellent results. I simply screw the ND on top of the MC protector. I notice you're using a circular polarizer for your Pro1. I read somewhere that all you need for a videocam is a linear polarizer (which costs like 1/3 or 1/4 that of circular one).

I dont know if Panasonic sells its 43mm filter set in the US. The set consists of MC Protector and ND8.

Other accessories:
Try using the cam first and decide whether you really need any lens converter. At its widest setting, the 35mm equivalent focal length of the 400 is 44.5mm. Using widescreen, I guesstimate something like 40-41mm. Probably, that would suffice most of your needs. I had one guy from LA who asked me to get him a wideconverter because he needed to shoot from about 10-15 feet a certain horizontal angle of view. But before he made the final decision, he had me measure the horizontal length covered by the MX5K at its widest from 10-15 feet :-)).

By the way, the GS400 by itself is a tad front heavy because of its larger and longer lens block (compared to the GS100). It's not that bad though, and I have learned to appreciate why the Sony's using 1/4.7" CCDs exhibit similar weight distribution imbalance. That's quite a lot of air (and paper perhaps) inside the lens barrel of the 953 and the GS100 :-(.
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Old July 15th, 2004, 10:58 PM   #11
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The cokin filter system is at best flimsy and does not provide very good lens shading. the top of the socalled shade is wide open.

the setup can be made to work using black wrap (matt black foil) which is available at any big camera supply like markertek ore B&H.

it's also possible to take a 1 to 1 1/2" wide piece of black waist band elastic and stitch it into a loop. The Black loop will then stretch over the open top of the filter holder and sun shield.

The better option is to invest in a Hi Tech or a Lee filterholder. You need the same workarounds for light leakage but to a lesser extent. the quality of the adapter, components and filters is a tad better as well.

If you want to go the whole nine yards you can buy a cavision 3x3 mattbox. This will accept3x3, 3x4, resin or glass filters. adapter frames are also available for the P size to fit into a 3x3 frame. The base 3x3 was $200 with the all metal calmpon going for $250. A mini set of rods and supports brackets was an additional $100/

You could also buy a step up ring and mount oversized circular filters and guarantee no vignetting. i agree with pat that Hoya make excellent filters, coated and otherwise. I stoped buying Tiffin because of quality concerns. (delivery as well)

Cavision
Lee Filters
Hitech
Hitech home

Do a search the sunshade/ filter frame has been done many times.
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Old July 19th, 2004, 06:25 PM   #12
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Guy,

I also have the Cokin A system on my 953. I like it. I was impressed by the fact that I can stack additional holders and or an additonal lens hood section on the front of it. Bought it at a local photographic place that specializes in still cameras.

It works very well and does not add much weight to the front of the camera. Just shot some footage in 16x9 yesterday with the half blue filter to help enhance the sky.

Funny thing is, I thought I was the only one that setup stuck on the front of their 953.

If anyone else is consideriing this system, I give it a thumbs up.

regards,
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Old August 16th, 2004, 09:33 AM   #13
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<<<-- Originally posted by Patricia Kim : You need a 62mm filter for the Raynox. Get the Hoya multicoated thins (try 2filter.com) for it to cut down on vignetting and flare. The cost of the lens plus the Hoyas works out to several hundred dollars - so now you have to worry about protecting your filters as well as the lens.

Hey Pat, I met a friend today who also owns a Raynox 5000 and he had a slightly cheaper alternative to the Hoya thins. He screwed a 62-72 step-up ring and then attached an ordinary 72mm MC protector. No vignetting at all. He ended up spending less than $30 instead of at least $40.
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Old August 16th, 2004, 02:26 PM   #14
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Someone else suggested to me once using the larger mm filter. It's a good idea, I just keep overlooking it because, unlike the guys on this board, who think bigger is better and more professional looking, I keep wanting my cam to be smaller so that I can manage it.

The other interesting thing is the way people feel about protective filters. I use the word "feel," because according to Frank G., dv resolution is such that the glass on the filter just doesn't matter that much. Doesn't stop everyone from looking for "water" glass, or whatever it's called, instead of the green stuff.

So when are you getting a gs400?
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Old August 18th, 2004, 02:35 AM   #15
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<<<-- Originally posted by Patricia Kim :
So when are you getting a gs400? -->>>

Price is getting better every week (the 1st black GS400 that I sold is cheaper than the cheapest black GS100) and my summer shooting days are over. My next big event is in October. That's my target :-).
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