Cleaning the front of the lens at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Panasonic P2HD / AVCCAM / AVCHD / DV Camera Systems > Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant > Panasonic DV / MX / GS series Assistant

Panasonic DV / MX / GS series Assistant
...and other Panasonic DV camcorders.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 23rd, 2006, 09:29 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London, UK
Posts: 42
Cleaning the front of the lens

What do people here use for keeping the front element clean? (Both of the camcorder and/or a wide-angle adapter)
__________________
Alex
Alex Lake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2006, 12:26 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 131
I always fit a UV filter - or ND or polariser if circumstances require them. I have never left the lens unprotected.
David Andrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2006, 12:56 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Monterey, CA
Posts: 404
Don't own a Panny (XL2) but I can tell you that the Lens Pen is a godsend. I use to use the solution and tissue paper that you would buy as a kit and it was damn hard to get a good clean while in the field, not too mention the hassle. One day I grabbed a lens pen I had for a consumer olympus still camera and tried it on a filter and it gets it right every time. Since then it is the only thing I use. Circuitcity.com has a killer deal right now, $2.99 vs reg $10-$15. Beware though, some have faulty tips that peel back. I've had good luck with Sigma Lens Pens (amazon.com) and Gemini Lens Pens. There are two types, the fine ones with a tip the size of a whole punch and the other that I use where the tip is the size of a dime.

Kevin
Kevin Janisch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2006, 06:44 PM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 1,276
Me too.

The downgrade quality by uv filter is ignored by me. ;-)

Regards
Leigh

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Andrews
I always fit a UV filter.
Leigh Wanstead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 03:13 AM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London, UK
Posts: 42
How interesting! Last time I asked, I think the suggestion was not to put anything in front of the lens (which I had thought seemed like "a good idea"). I think I'll kill two birds with one stone here, and get myself 1 (or 2) UV filters and build a lenshood onto it.

S0 - what kind of UV filter should I go for?!

Would a Hoya HMC UV(0) 72mm be OK? (I presume that the "MC" bit stands for "Multi Coated")
__________________
Alex
Alex Lake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 03:28 AM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Billericay, England UK
Posts: 4,711
Alex - you really don't need a UV filter unless you're going somewhere really dusty, wet or filled with inquisitive, stick-fingered children. Modern lens coatings are a whole lot tougher these days, and you can use a well washed 'micro-fibre' cloth with confidence.

Certainly avoid using filters with add-on lenses - they'll increase the chances of vignetting and will add extra flare. I can prove it in seconds.

Lots of what I've been saying for years is here:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/co...m-feb-05.shtml

tom.
Tom Hardwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 03:42 AM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: London, UK
Posts: 42
Ah yes, I remember it all now...

Multi-coating is all about preventing internal reflections, isn't it? So I suppose it's irrelevant whether or not the Raynox HD6600Pro is multi-coated or not (but I suspect it isn't).

I think I might get one (They're pretty cheap) and :-
a) Do some tests
b) Take it off when in "low-risk" environments.

As for using it as a basis for a lenshood, perhaps I'd be better off with something slimmer (perhaps a step-up ring?)
__________________
Alex
Alex Lake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 04:05 AM   #8
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Billericay, England UK
Posts: 4,711
Correct, multi-coating is simply there to decrease the level of reflected light from the surface of the element. It also helps reduce the flare caused by total internal reflection. Multi-coating can of course be applied to 2 coatings or to 5, so beware the term.

One or some of the multi-coatings will hopefully be a hardening coat, and my spectacles are proof of this. I have Zeiss elements with the finest multi-coating I could buy. I've worn these specks on my nose day in and day out for three years, and regular as clockwork I clean them on anything I have to hand - including kitchen paper (made from trees). The coating is a perfect today as it was over 1000 days ago, I assure you.

You're right, the Raynox 6600Pro has only a single coat to save money. Treat it with care, but don't UV filter it, it just makes (flare) matters worse.

Not sure I understand your last sentence about lenshoods...

tom.
Tom Hardwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 04:05 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Billericay, England UK
Posts: 4,711
Correct, multi-coating is simply there to decrease the level of reflected light from the surface of the element. It also helps reduce the flare caused by total internal reflection. Multi-coating can of course be applied to 2 coatings or to 5, so beware the term.

One or some of the multi-coatings will hopefully be a hardening coat, and my spectacles are proof of this. I have Zeiss elements with the finest multi-coating I could buy. I've worn these specks on my nose day in and day out for three years, and regular as clockwork I clean them on anything I have to hand - including kitchen paper (made from trees). The coating is a perfect today as it was over 1000 days ago, I assure you.

You're right, the Raynox 6600Pro has only a single coat to save money. Treat it with care, but don't UV filter it, it just makes (flare) matters worse.

Not sure I understand your last sentence about lenshoods...

tom.
Tom Hardwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 04:06 AM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Billericay, England UK
Posts: 4,711
oops, how did the double post happen? Sorry chaps.
Tom Hardwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2006, 12:23 PM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick
Alex - you really don't need a UV filter unless you're going somewhere really dusty, wet or filled with inquisitive, stick-fingered children....
tom.
Typical of many of my situations! And for wet read salty sea water. For these I believe a filter is a very wise precaution.
David Andrews is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Panasonic P2HD / AVCCAM / AVCHD / DV Camera Systems > Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant > Panasonic DV / MX / GS series Assistant

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:18 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network