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Old February 22nd, 2006, 05:04 AM   #1
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NV-GS400 Frame Rate?

Hi I'm new to the NV-GS400. I was told you could manually alter the frame rate however I can't find this, not even to slow down the frame rate! Also, how do I switch to manual focus?
Thanks guys
Eddy Strickland
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 06:02 AM   #2
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Try the Panasonic download centre here to get a copy of the manual if you do not already have one:
http://www.panasonic.co.uk/customer-...oad-centre.asp

The GS400 records to the miniDV format. This is 25fps in PAL. There are no alternative frame rates. You have a choice of 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios. Open the lcd screen and select the button labelled Aspect/ProCinema, it is the top one in a column of four buttons. This will toggle you through normal (ie 4:3), 16:9 and ProCinema (which is 16:9 recorded at 25 frames per second). I use 16:9 all the time now; it produces a good widescreen picture. The manual warns that ProCinema will produce a strobe like effect - haven`t used it myself.

You switch between auto, AE lock and manual by pushing the small lever on the left hand side of the camera body just behind the lens. In manual mode you will see three buttons sbove this lever labelled WB, shutter/iris and focus/zoom. Use these buttons in conjunction with multi manual ring to get the adjustment you want.
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 06:53 AM   #3
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thanks very much! I knew about the pro cinema etc. mode but thanks for that anyway! I'm shooting a short film using this camera in a few weeks, any tips/flaws I should know about the camera? (This isn't my first short film, I pretty much know what i'm doing, this was just a new camera you see :D)
thanks!
Eddy Strickland

Last edited by Eddy Strickland; February 22nd, 2006 at 08:20 AM.
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 03:10 PM   #4
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It is not a good performer in low light. In bright sunlight it is worthwhile having a couple of ND filters to hand. Zebra function is useful - I leave mine on all the time.
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 06:52 PM   #5
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Thanks David!
I will be shooting with lighting so there shouldn't be a problem, I use Zebras pretty much all of the time as well. I am dissapointed with this camera in that the viewfinder is not black and white, I find black and white makes it easier when sorting out the zebras :D And thanks for the tip on neutral densitys, I have a couple lying around but I think they're 49mm so i'll need a "converter" I forget what they're called but I have a few of them for different sizes also. What do you think on the use of a Polarising filter in bright sunlight?
Many thanks again David you're a great help!
Eddy Strickland
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Old February 23rd, 2006, 02:53 AM   #6
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I have a polariser in my bag. Beware that if you fit more than one screw in filter you will probably get vignetting. I tend to stick with the ND unless dealing with reflections when I swap to the polariser.

Another GS400 feature that is very useful to me is the ability to capture 4MP stills to the SD card. I use this a lot for later use in my final output, either as p-i-p or imported into Imaginate to create video clips from stills using the track and zoom possible with that programme. But that is a function of some of the stuff I do and may not be relevant to you.
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Old February 23rd, 2006, 06:14 AM   #7
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Couldn't the vignetting be sorted simply with a little cropping in post though? Ahh yes I have done the same as you before, use a high res picture (like from the GS400s 'photo' facility) and having it track around in post. I like premiere and final cut myself. I've never really been an avid man to be honest but I have used it. What is Imaginate used for primarily?
Thanks again David!
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Old February 23rd, 2006, 10:38 AM   #8
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Imaginate is a Canopus product. It is designed to take stills (up to c200) at their original resolution and use the programme to pan, tilt, rotate, track, zoom etc across them and make an avi out them. Info can be found here:
http://www.canopus.com/products/Imaginate/index.php
Check out the link to swatches in the right hand column of the Imaginate page to get an idea of things you can do with it.

Not sure where the Avid reference came from. I am unfamiliar with Avid - I am an Edius Pro user.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 03:25 AM   #9
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Now i'm confused, are you sure it's 25p? I read on here

http://www.camcorderinfo.com/content...der-Review.htm

That's it fake 30p?
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Old February 24th, 2006, 07:04 AM   #10
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The frame rate is 25 FPS for PAL and 30 FPS for NTSC. The frames are interlaced at 50 fields/second in PAL and 60 fields/second in NTSC. The GS400 also has a frame mode that creates a pseudo-progressive frame at 25 and 30 FPS. Frame mode can be set manually in normal and wide aspect ratios. Frame mode is automatically set in Procinema mode. In order to set frame mode (from the menu), still picture resolution has to be set to 640x480.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 09:03 AM   #11
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So technically it's not 25 progressive. Just pseudo-progressive. Also, is it real 16:9? I am seriously thinking of buying one of these.

Last edited by Yasser Kassana; February 24th, 2006 at 09:49 AM.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 11:10 AM   #12
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Panasonic prefixes NTSC cameras with PV and PAL cameras with NV. The original query was about the NV-GS-400

It is not a native 16:9 chip, as I understand it, but I think it produces a good 16:9 image. It is certainly OK for my modest purposes.

Panasonic have stopped making them now; a new one will be hard to find. The nearest replacement is the GS500 which lacks several features found in the GS400.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 07:44 AM   #13
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Frame mode creates a progressive frame. Both fields are taken simultaneously and combined in the DSP to create a full frame. The combining process does create a 480 line (NTSC) or 576 line (PAL) frame but the resolution is not the same as if the frame was truly progressive. It looks really good, however, and in some regards is better than if you deinterlaced the video using software.

Widescreen on the GS400 and GS500 is outstanding. Possibly the best widescreen on a high end consumer standard definition camcorder and much better than the widescreen on some of the Proline cams. It takes a 16:9 footprint from the 4:3 CCDs to create a true widescreen image with widened field of view. You can't do better than this unless you are using an XL2 or HDV cam, IMO.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 05:21 AM   #14
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So it is progressive? I've heard in progressive mode alot of blurring is visible.
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Old April 7th, 2006, 01:34 PM   #15
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The highest frame rate you can get from the video you take is 60fps. If I want slow motion shooting I just use normal 60i which is the only setting in the camera anyways. I import the 60i footage, deinterlace to 60p using a AE plugin I have, then alter the frame rate. If you shoot in 24p on a camera, thats all you can get. If you shoot with 60i you can at the most get 60 frames to work with which is really nice for slow motion. Once you deinterlace 60i to 60p you can alter the frame rate to just about anything. Look up the program Twixtor to find out about this. Just my quick explaination of whats possible with the 60i capabilities of the 400.
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