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Panasonic DVX / DVC Assistant
The 4K DVX200 plus previous Panasonic Pro Line cams: DVX100A, DVC60, DVC30.


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Old February 5th, 2005, 12:36 PM   #1
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squeeze or no squeeze?

with the dvx100a, are there any advantages in shooting 16x9 squeeze mode over normal 16x9 (mattes) if your end project will end up in 4x3 format/letterboxed? do you gain any lines of resolution in squeeze mode or do you end up with 360 lines either way?

mb
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Old February 5th, 2005, 02:29 PM   #2
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No advantage whatsoever. You will actually end up with slightly less resolution in your specific stated case.

Squeeze mode is for when your footage will be displayed on a 16:9 television. For your specific needs (a 16:9 image letterboxed within a 4:3 video stream, for display on 4:3 televisions) Squeeze mode would be the wrong choice.
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Old February 5th, 2005, 10:50 PM   #3
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Re: squeeze or no squeeze?

<<<-- Originally posted by Michael Buendia : with the dvx100a, are there any advantages in shooting 16x9 squeeze mode over normal 16x9 (mattes) if your end project will end up in 4x3 format/letterboxed? do you gain any lines of resolution in squeeze mode or do you end up with 360 lines either way?

mb -->>>

Squeeze mode will give you a wider field of view then simply chopping off the top and bottom of a 4:3 image (matte approach.)
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Old February 6th, 2005, 02:54 AM   #4
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Incorrect. Squeeze uses the exact same width area of the CCD as Letterbox mode does. It just digitally stretches it.

The anamorphic adapter will give you a wider field of view, but Squeeze mode does not.
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Old February 6th, 2005, 03:40 AM   #5
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it really is wirth the added resolution by going anamorphic, on top of that the friggin lens ends up looking like a bloody panavision which is no bad thing ;)

but as mentioned, your field of vision is only strected vertically, u gain nothing horizontally.
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Old February 6th, 2005, 06:04 AM   #6
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<<<-- Originally posted by Barry Green : Incorrect. Squeeze uses the exact same width area of the CCD as Letterbox mode does. It just digitally stretches it.

The anamorphic adapter will give you a wider field of view, but Squeeze mode does not. -->>>

I compared squeeze mode on my 100A to the in-camera letter box mode, and I noticed a wider field of view. Maybe it's a psychological thing, but it was why I chose to shoot my comedy in squeeze mode. I'll test it out again, though.
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Old February 6th, 2005, 06:08 AM   #7
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line the edge of your frame up with a vertical object, like a door or pole youll notice that the width will not change.
One way to preserve SOME resolution, is to run the video track (in post) just on the edge of the action safe area (pan crop tool). This will shrink your footage a lil but you can save anything between 7 to 10% if shot correctly.
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Old February 6th, 2005, 06:21 AM   #8
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No need to test, you guys you would know more then me about this. I'm not that technical. But damn, if I would have known this before....
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Old February 8th, 2005, 04:38 PM   #9
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What if you vainly hope that one day you'll be one of the 1% of people who get a film out? Is letterboxing still better? (obviously Anamorphic is best, but we don't have that option).
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Old February 8th, 2005, 10:44 PM   #10
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Letterbox would be preferable to squeeze for a film transfer, yes.
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Old February 12th, 2005, 08:08 PM   #11
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if your going to letterbox, i would suggest doing it in post.. this will at least give u 20 odd % more framing, so u can correct or adjust framing in post if need be.

another thing, if u run 4:3 in a Vegas 16:9 project, it will NOT strecth your footage, instead, you can go into the pan crop of the clip and select 16:9. All it will do is CROP the tops and bottoms off.. it will not stretch your footage

I had to return my anamorphic lense due to the plastic securing thread being so damn plasticcy, that i knew it would be a continuing problem. I do all my 16:9 work in post now.. i shoot 4:3, wack on a 16:9 project and adjust the pan crop to fit 16:9, and THEN i change the aspect OF THE ACTUAL PHYSICAL CLIP to 16:9

I lose no resolution by doing this, apart from gettin the tops and bottoms chopped.. which im ok with anyway.. btu tahts vgas.. i dont know what u use..
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Old March 27th, 2005, 03:00 AM   #12
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I recommend using a matte in post. That way you don't see it stretched when previewing your video, and you don't have to flag it as anamorphic.

However, just a little advice in regards to the anamorphic - get it. Get it if you can afford it. Trust me.

The difference on paper doesn't seem like a lot to people. Some minor increase in resolution. But the difference when it's being displayed at full-quality on a television is really what matters - and I'm telling you from experience, it's amazing.

I've always watched my projects on a 54" HDTV. It's fairly easy to see grain or pixellation on that thing.

Without the anamorphic, the DVX is sharp, but it's not like razor-sharp. You can still tell it was shot DV, see some artifacts or graininess every now and then.

With the anamorphic lens, the footage looks RAZOR SHARP. The difference is huge, it's actually VERY noticable. I'm very glad I bought it.

Just my $.02, of course.
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Old March 27th, 2005, 01:41 PM   #13
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16:9 in post

No one mentioned it in this thread but another clear advantage of dong the 16:9 matte in post is that you can adjust the vertical cropping anywhere within the 4:3 image. I have found this invaluable and I like having the option to adjust the framing in post in case I did not exactly nail it in the heat of battle, especially for moving the camera.
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Old March 27th, 2005, 08:29 PM   #14
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Well, no one mentioned the clear advantage of lighter compression that is gained by cropping in camera...


I strongly disagree with the practice of "doing it in post"!
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Old March 28th, 2005, 05:04 AM   #15
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Yes, "doing in post" is GENERALLY a bad thing to do, usually due to lower image quality as a result of altering your image.

HOWEVER, this is a case where it actually works the other way around. You add a matte in post, you can take it out. You add it in-camera, you're stuck with it.

Perhaps it's not a choice that will matter too often, but it is nonetheless a choice you have, and doing it in post does not in any way degrade your image quality - but gives you more options. I mean, what if you decided you wanted to crop this wide to 2.35:1 or something? You'd have to go in and do that in post anyway.
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